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I found a great deal on honey at Ocean State Job Lot so I bought a huge jar. However, it smells funny and tastes awful-reminds me of brown rice syrup. I noticed it is from India. I didn't know honey could go "bad", I don't think it's bad, but I also don't think it's actual honey. :xeye: I hate waste, should I toss it? Or use it in baking?
 

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Vampire Slayer
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Toss it. It won't taste any better if you bake with it and its more likely that its been contaminated with God only knows what.
Honey generally does not go bad. I think some beekeepers have experienced "slime" honey, but stuff like that wouldn't be sold by anyone reputable.
 

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Pure honey shouldn't go bad. I remember reading that edible honey was found in the pyramids and consumed after thousands of years had passed.

I would toss it.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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I have seen reports of 'honey' being sold with as much as 70% HFCS in it.

I have produced a black honey that looked, smelled and tasted like molasses. But other than that anything slimy has been adulterated.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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The beginning of spring I bought a bad bottle of raw honey. It had a rotten body odor smell to it. Im guessing something died in one of the hives and the owners didnt cycle that hive. It happens on big operations, I just brought it back and swapped for a new bottle letting the vendor know they need to give this bottle back to the hive operators with this information.
I mean you no disrespect. Do not take this an an insult. I find it extremely unlikely that anything got into a hive and died, and had the effect you describe.

Our local beekeeping club has many small beekeepers and a few BIG ones.

The big ones make their money trucking and renting out their hives to farmers. They view honey as a by-product that their accountants would prefer they dump in a land-fill. They feel such would be 'wrong', but they make their money from rentals and messing with honey for them is loosing profit. What they do instead is they fill 55-gallon drums and sell it to the club.

The BIG beekeepers in this area do tend to have crates with fancy plastic bear bottles filled with honey. They bought those bottle pre-filled with imported honey at a distributor. It is not worth their time to filter honey, wash bottles, sterilize a work-room, fill bottles, load bottles into crates, and clean the mess afterwards. It is cheaper for them to simply buy large quantities of honey from a factory overseas already in fancy bottles.

Small beekeepers [like me] focus mostly on getting our bees to survive. Some of us do not harvest at all, just hoping the hives have enough to feed themselves through the winter months. Some of us [like me] do harvest, but we end up feeding most of that honey back to the hives in the form of syrup.

We are all encouraged to:
#1 - buy honey in bulk from those 55-gallon drums to bottle ourselves to provide for when people approach wanting to buy honey from a local beekeeper.
#2 - buy pre-bottled honey form overseas.

The clubs want to keep plenty honey on hand to sell to the small beekeepers. They first get drums from the BIG beekeepers and then they buy commercially. That commercial honey comes from overseas; China or India.



The honey you bought that did not smell 'right' came from over seas and is likely loaded with HFCS.

I have even seen where people boiled flowers to make a tea and then added HFCS to get it to thicken, and they called that honey.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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I find it odd that one label says 'unstrained'. I get a good deal of pollen in our honey if I do not strain it. Un-strained honey should have tiny specks of visible pollen, yellow and the size of a period on your PC screen. It may also have visible bee body parts.

Folks in our church ask about honey, wanting really, it to be loaded with pollen. So I strain honey and then I add pollen and mix it. I want to strain it to make sure there are no insect parts in it. I collect pollen separately anyway. And I know that what they honestly want is the pollen [for their allergies], which is why I load up their honey with extra pollen.

I scrape our honey frames with a heated knife, so I end up getting a bit of everything into it. It all goes into a low-heat crock-pot to melt the wax, and cool. After it cools I can lift away the wax [and most bee body parts] and ladle out the honey to go through a strainer.



As to the smell, I am sure you are right in it's bad smell. Honey should never smell like that.

I have not observed honey being able to absorb any foul smells from dead rodents. Honey is sealed inside the comb where it is perfectly preserved forever. If anything a dead rodent found in the spring that crawled inside and died should smell like honey.

I think you got yourself some imported 'honey' substitute.

:)
 

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real honey should not go bad I have never had it go bad only thing is after a while it might crystalize but thats easy to fix

might want to take some to the local beekeepers association or your ag coop someone prol will have a honey tester to tell you wats in it i would deff recomend it
 

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Thanks all for the input . I have bees but do not harvest the honey just so the bees survive, that's all I really care about .
The queen is not captured and they are free to go but have remained in the box we made for them for over 2 years now .
 

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Before the big companies get a hold of it, different batches of honey smell and taste different. Sometimes that is good, sometimes it is very NOT good. The large honey companies mix the flavors together, to get a consistant product.

Light honey tastes better, but I prefer a darker honey for baking. Darker honey is usually Fall honey, while light honey is often from clover or fruit blossoms. Some people hate the taste of goldenrod honey and so they leave that for the bee's winter food.

Lastly, if honey has not been dehydrated enough, it can mold and ferment. Does your India honey taste alcoholic?
 
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