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I was thinking of snagging this heater for a bug-in type situation. Long term situation i relocate 15 miles & have a wood-stove.

For a scenario where i have no electricity for a few days i'd prefer to stay home. Obviously can't run the heat-pump w/no juice...


$34 bucks

Anyone know how long this would run on 5 gallons of propane?

Is there a better solution?

Thanks

/edit - sorry, here's teh link: http://www.joessports.com/product/i...cp=712457&parentPage=family&parentPage=family
 

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Neat little heater, only concern would be proper venting...If you have a bug-in place and want to heat it, I'd check out Craiglsit for a cheap old iron wood stove to install in the place...then you have choices, you could stay or bug out to your place in the sticks with the wood stove there...
 

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Hi Maurepas

You asked.......
“How long does it go on one canister and can you adapt it to a tank?”
Well, it is strictly an emergency heater for me, so other than starting it up when I first got it, to make sure it worked correctly, I have not had to use it.

I got mine used from Ebay for about $50.00, but I saw them at wal-mart the other day, for $88.00(I think).

It has two settings, so I expect to be able to keep it low, if it seems use too much gas.
(I keep it in an old suet case, with 8 bottles of Gas, stored in my basement!)
--------------------------------------------------
And yes, it can be connected to a larger tank.

I am looking on Ebay for a hose, for that purpose.
 

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36 hours

LP gas has a BTU content of about 91,000 BTU's per gallon (close enough).

The heater is advertised as putting out up to 10,000 BTU's. So lets use that as the setting.

5 gallon (20 pound) LP tanks are only filled to 80 percent these days, so that is 4 gallons of propane.

The (old math)

91,000 BTU per gallon times 4 gallons = 364,000 BTUs total.

divided by 10,000 = just over 36 hours on maximum heat setting.

Since you can adjust the heat down, you get more time.

You would get 50 hours with a 7 gallon (30 LB) LP tank.

Hope this helps
 

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I just found a report by the Consumer Product Safety Commission on portable heaters. It gets a little deep, but you can find it here:http://www.cpsc.gov/LIBRARY/FOIA/FOIA05/os/CO03.pdf

follow up:
It has always been a major irritant of mine that whenever we have winter storms, freezing weather and power outages the media comes out with this long list of what you can’t do in order to avoid CO poisoning. For the most part, they are very valid points and those who ignore them end up as causalities. However, nobody ever mentions what you CAN do to keep the family warm and fed (to some extent) other than to go the local government-run shelter. :mad:

The CPSC report should provide the information needed to make some kind of intelligent decision about portable heaters. At least, that is my hope. It is pretty deep and will take a bit of study.
 

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recomendations

I recommend the BBQ type grill lighters, very convenient.

Very few buildings are constructed tight enough to deplete your oxygen supply, most houses breathe a lot, many, total air volume exchanges, per day. If you worry, crack a window about 1/4 inch.

I have several small wall type LP heaters, all have 3 heat settings 6000, 12000 and 18000 BTU.

Note, I never leave the heater on while I sleep.

On the lowest heat setting (6000 BTU), I have to shut the heater down after about an hours burn time due to overheating. My cabin size is 300 sq ft, and it is well insulated. Our low temperatures are usually in the low 20's and occasionally in single digits. I can heat the cabin to 70 degrees at night, shut the heater down, and get up to room temperatures in the low 60's the next morning, so no need to risk sleeping with the heater on.

On the same heat setting, the wall heater in my shop will make its 650 ft sq, nice and toasty, however, it takes a while to heat that space.

I am giving those examples so you will have an idea about what space the posted heater might heat.

As an emergency heater the heater you show would work pretty well. Some models have an oxygen depletion sensor if that is an important feature.
 

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On the one you have you could also get a hose extender and extend it to a 50-100 gallon tank and be completey sure you will be ok. This is the way I have been doing it.
 

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We use a Paulin double heater in our trailer at deer camp and in the house during winter power outages. Its attached to a 20lb propane tank when in use. It has 2 burners and Hi-Low heat settings. Its perfectly safe to use inside and heats a large room just fine. Just be sure to have plenty of ventilation. I highly recommend it.

http://www.paulinproducts.com/outdoor_heaters/double_heater_2500-ez.htm
 

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I have a Mr Heater and it works well inside for a smaller space
http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_200307957_200307957

Provides temporary heat for barns, sheds, cabins, campers, patios, garages, sporting events, hunting blinds and more. Dual heating system combines radiant heat comfort with convection heat air flow for maximum heating efficiency. 4000, 9000 and 18,000 BTU with the capacity to heat up to 400 square feet for up to 108 hours.
 
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