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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sheesh! I had a brand new Nissan 350z and took it out drifting. A new, (then) Toyota Tacoma and broke spring by taking off big jumps, and off-roading with it. I beat the hell out of everything I own. I like using stuff that I own. Not just cars, but everything. I buy it to use it like it was intended to be used.

Today, I took my new Colt 6920 with Eotech out for the first time, and I was really anxious about getting scratches on it. Simple things like sighting it in, I was being so gentle to not scratch the post or mark up the front sight detent. Same with the Eotech. Just using a coin to change settings on would give light marks and I'd get a little queezy about it.

Anyone else baby their rifles more than anything else they own? Am I going to get over this? I don't think I would mind if it looked like it was taken into battle for a year. Not today, though. Probably not tomorrow. Maybe I just have a different level of respect, since this is my first AR. If it was a 350z, I would have piled into a parked car by now, (it happened and I didn't even blink an eye.)
 

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Here's my safety Sir
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Nope mine are made for using, like owning a Harley, ride it like you stole it (just cleanem before puttingem up)
 

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I baby everything I own...I washed the mower after mowing this evening. (Normally I just blow it off with the compressor.) I used to really rag out my YJ then I realized I'd never have another so I take it easy on her these days.

I try and take reasonable care of my firearms, but normal wear and tear doesn't bother me much. Since I don't carry/use mine on a daily basis they stay pretty much new looking.
 

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Garbage Collector
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All rifles are tools like hammers and shovels, they get dings and scratches on them from being used like they are intended.

I take mine in the water all the time, if you are scared to scratch it you need to get over that quick, any real training is going to get it muddy, dragged across rocks, thrown in sand, gravel, and dropped.

Never forget t's a weapon made to kill other humans, not a family heirloom.
 

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operatorchan.org
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As long as its functional and goes "BANG!" when you pull the trigger then don't worry. I have a new Luminox watch I got for my birthday and I scratched the face of it yesterday moving rocks. At first I said "*** **** ***** **** *****," but then I realized "hey it still works, I can still read it perfectly fine. Its not a scratch, its character :)"
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yeah, I'll probably stop thinking about resale value soon, and just use it. I don't know why this thing is commanding a new kind of respect out of me. Maybe I'm just growing up a little.

I'll take it out again, and add a little "character".
 

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Gettin There
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There is a big difference between using and abusing. If you use it you are going to get scratches, dings, or w/e. If you abuse something you could damage anything badly.

Back when I had my trucks I always said that I would use them as they were intended, but I would not go out of my way to destroy them.
 

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I Sleep with my Boots ON!
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I never throw my rifles around but if dinged up during use or training I don't care, that's why I bought them. My LMT CQP MRP is about 1 1/2 years old now with Trijicon Acog on it and it has some characteristic wear marks and I love it even on a $3500 setup..
 

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The only way I baby my toys is by taking good measures during maintenance.

This goes for cars, firearms, tools, etc.

Otherwise, they're pushed to their maximum. Not every time... But alot of the time.
 

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You HAVE to "abuse" your rifle when you first get it. That's how you break it in and determine real quick if there are any major issues going on with it.

You don't want to baby your rifle for years, the when SHTF and your life depends on it, find out the hard way that it's a lemon.

Not the time to find out you were sold a lemon.

When I say "abuse" I mean treat it like a rifle you take to war.....not actually purposefully damage/break it.... :D:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Matt ATX;40 31399 said:
Just buy another 6920 so you'll have a battle rifle and one you can baby.
I'm planning to get "spare parts"from time to time. Eventually, it will hopefully be enough to assemble another one. Next one will be match grade, if all goes well.
 

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This is a personal preference thing. If you are just taking it out on range trips like 90% of most shooters do, then there is no reason to beat your rifle up. If you like to have nice things then by all means, keep it nice.

It does not make you any less of a man to keep things neat and nice.

It does however keep the value on your firearm high in the event that you ever do sell it.

It really is a matter of personal pride in what you own. Just take comfort in knowing that if ever need be, your weapon could take a beating and keep running. You know this because all the other guys out there tested theirs like that for you. Plus the military swears by them. Usually its the scenario driven what if mall ninjas that tell you that you have to beat your equipment up because they worship and emulate what they see in pictures, movies, and on youtube. Most vets will tell you to be meticulous in the care of your equipment.

Lastly, every rifleman lives by this motto, "Take care of your rifle and it will take care of you." Simple but very true words.
 

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How much you should abuse a rifle and how much it can be abused are two very different things IMO. I have this one buddy who has a habit of taking out his bad moods in very cringeworthy ways. One such event was using his M4 as a walking stick - in GA mud - after a storm. Then he had the rather long and monotonous task of cleaning it. I don't know if the average user can appreciate just how much he had to clean that rifle :D: And, well, that was definitely a task he thoroughly deserved. After a total cleaning, it fired again, though I think he probably needed to change his underwear after taking that first shot. My point is that it worked, but I wouldn't recommend it!

I wouldn't say ARs need coddling. They have relatively small tolerances, which is part of what makes them good rifles. AKs have larger tolerances which is part of what makes them good rifles. You shouldn't fire any rifle with crud in the barrel or receiver, though it does happen. Keep your dust cover closed, a mag in and ideally a shoot-through cap on the barrel and you're good to go. My dad said that when he was younger they'd put condoms over rifle barrels (yeah, I know - no **** sherlock) to keep crud out after his brother got a bit of mud in his shotgun and it split open like a banana. Supposedly the purpose-made barrel caps are suppose to blow off from the gases before the bullet reaches them, but I'm not sure if that holds true or not.

I find that the first ding on something is always a bit disheartening, but every subsequent ding just feels like it's gaining character. If you're really concerned about damaging the finish, you may want to consider a camo pattern or something - some minor scrapes may get lost in the pattern fairly well, and if you DIY then you could always touch it up yourself, too.

Pete
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Yeah, I'm in no way wanting to treat it like I do my cars, motorcycles, (constant wheelies and stoppies and dropping it) or anything else. I just felt weird about using it. Once the idea of resale leaves my mind, I'll be more casual with it, I guess.

I hope to take a couple of courses with it and expect I'll be well over it by then. It just kind of took me by surprise that when I'm so rough on my $4000-30,000 possessions, I would feel so weird about one that costs significantly less.
 
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