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Discussion Starter #1
My B.O.B is a work in progress. I find that I'm never satisfied with it, not even close. To heavy, wrong contents, wrong bag, whatever my thoughts may be. It mostly comes down to what I want to have vs. weight. I'm a backpacker so this issue is not new to me but with backpacking i'm not as much worried about long term durability of the equipment.
Currently I'm using the MOLLIE 2 (the old version with the separate sleep system compartment, though I did change out the frame for the newer more durable version) I sewed MOLLIE webbing on the sides of the sleep system carrier and removed the old style top flap and sewed on the new version with mesh map case and MOLLIE on the top. I also have the two sustainment pouches, the assault pack, and the waist pack. So this thing ends up being a heavy bulky system although a very modular one. I have an ILBE on the way (admittedly heavy, probably not as heavy as what I have now) but it's durable and more inline with what i'm used to (size and shape wise) backpacking.
I'm wondering if you guys could take a look at my contents list and let me know your thoughts, what to add or remove. Over all critique. It's a lot of stuff and a lot of weight once water is added, probably pushing 65lbs at least.

I carry a Leatherman ReBar, flashlight, and lighter on me at all times.

Fire Kit
Water Proof Matches (in plastic container)
Water Proof Matches (in box)
Magnesium Fire Starter
Lighter
8 fire starters(Vaseline Soaked Cotton Balls)

Water
Katadyne Vario Water filter
A. Extra o-ring set and lube
B. Carbon refill kit
Iodine Purification Tablets
2ea 1 quart canteens
1ea 3 liter water bladder

Shelter
Kelty (22 degree) Sleeping Bag
Gortex Bivy Sack
Backpack Tent
Sleeping Pad

Food and Food Prep
A. 3ea Breakfasts
1. Cheerios+powdered milk
2. 1ea juice packet
3. 1ea Coffee Packet
4. Protein Bar
5. 2ea candies

B. 3ea Snack Packs
1. Oatmeal
2. Protein Bar
3. Pack of crackers

C. 7ea Dehydrated dinners(mountain house single serving meals)
Estbit Stove
2 1/2ea packages of trioxane
1ea set of utensils
P-38
1ea Canteen Cup

Clothing
1ea Camo pants
1ea Camo button shirt
1ea Army issue T-Shirt
2ea briefs
3ea cotton socks--will be getting wool
1ea cotton boot socks--will be getting wool
1ea LCWS bottoms--base layer
1ea LCWS tops--base layer
1ea light fleece sweater
1ea beanie
1ea wool gloves
Rain Pants--packable
Rain Jacket--packable

Hygiene Kit
Small bar of soap
small tissue
shampoo packet
comb
tooth brush
tooth paste
Floss
6ea antibacterial hand wipes
finger nail clippers
wash cloth
hand sanitizer
1ea roll of toilet paper

Lighting
Head lamp (with red) (AAA’s)
Flashlight (AAA’s)

Coms and Navigation
Emergency radio/light/charging ability (AAA’s)
write in rain paper
3ea Pencils
State map
County Map
Compass
Signal Mirror

Fishing Kit
5ea Weights-3/8oz
20ea Weights 1/12oz
20ea #2 Hooks
20ea #4 Hooks
12ea 36” 20lb test Leader
3ea small floats
3ea fake worms
5ea fake bail
100yards 10lb test monofilament fishing line
1ea razor blade
9ea screw eyelets

Tools
Saber Saw
Survival Knife
Pocket Knife
Wire--bailing
Rope
Folding Trowel

Power
2ea 6 cell “AAA” Battery Caddy’s
12ea “AAA” Batteries
Small Rechargeable Power Pack

Misc.
1ea Space Blanket
1ea clear emergency poncho
1ea folded loaf pan
cheap garbage bags(about 10)
Para Cord

Repair Kit
Sewing
1. 10ea large buttons
2. 2ea medium buttons
3. 2ea small buttons
4. 3ea needle threaders
5. 1ea razor blade
6. 14ea safety pins
7. 4ea straight pins
8. 2 large sewing needles
9. 6ea various size sewing needles
10. 2ea star wraps of green tough thread
11.1 cardboard wrap of khakie thread
12. 1 cardboard wrap of green thread
Webbing
1. 2 plastic buckles
2. 3 Keepers
3. 6’ea 1” nylon webbing
1ea sharpening stone (coarse)
11ea 8” zip ties
1ea small roll of duck tape

First Aid
Large (Trauma)
1. Tourniquet
2. Israeli Battle Dressing
3. Field Dressing
4. Roll Tape
5. Elastic (Ace) Bandage
6. 2ea Roll Gauze
7. 2ea Quick Clot
8. 2ea Chest Seal
9. 2ea Ab Pads
10. 4ea Antibacterial Wipes
11. 2ea large band-aids
Boo-Boo Kit
1. 10ea Band-aids
2. 3ea Burn Gel Packets
3. 5ea Triple Antibiotic
5. 3ea 2”x2” Gauze
6. 6ea Antiseptic Towelettes
7. 6ea Alcohol Prep Pads
8. 4ea Cleansing Towelettes
9. 10ea Ibuprofen
10. 1ea Small Kling Wrap
12. 2ea large Band-Aids
13. Blister Kit--with moleskin
14. 2ea Super Glue Singles
Add On’s
1. Trauma Shears
2. Sunblock
3. Chap-stick
4. Snake Bite Kit
5. Insect Repellent
6. Sting-Eze
 

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reluctant sinner
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I didn't see tweezers very handy for splinters you will get by not having leather or mechanic gloves. Bottle of eye wash because you don't have eye protection. Bandanna because you don't have a dust mask.

No multi tool? I hope you have really strong fingers so you can sew up your shoe. I sew everything in the field with dental floss 2 to 10 strands - the un waxed will take your seam sealer.

You can make buttons in the field, plastic or wood will work.

Bailing wire - I'd want braided cable - makes better traps/snares.

1 Quik clot, chest seal, ab pad is enough, personally if you are shot up that bad you're done - if its for someone else use their stuff or make do.

A two sided stone will work better than 1 grit.

For 65# I'd want more food.

A couple of heavy duty contractor bags will be way more useful than a roll of cheap garbage sacks.

You should on multi purpose/tasking example cotton balls with like chap stick in pill bottle - fire starting, lips and bait.

Its late and I'm tired. I suggest you live out of that pack as much as you for several days and see what you actually use.
 

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What is your bug out plan?

A person simply cannot carry everything they would need to be ready for everything on their back and be able to move very far or very fast.

So instead you make plans which can point in certain directions for gear.

Nothing you have appears useless but much of it you may not need or may not have close to enough of depending on what your bug out plan is.

Personally, I do not have one bug out bag at all but several for different things, about 500lbs worth of stuff all together.

I would never bug out on foot unless forced to, in which case most of that gets left behind, but since that is a worse case scenario I have bags of other gear ready for a more plausible vehicle bug out where I could take months worth of food and enough tools to build a cabin.

But I also have a 8lb ditch bag with little more than bandaids, a single meal, fire kit and rain poncho for times when a even a backpack may be too much.

So it all depends on what your plan is.

I will say, seconded on having a multitool, I don't leave my house without one and use it constantly. I find more uses for pliers than I do a knife honestly.

My ditch bag has very little in it but it does have goggles and a 'buff' facemask/bandana. Smoke, dust, things flying through the air etc is a pretty common denominator of disaster.
 

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Wile E Coyote, Genius.
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33,454 Posts
Just a few items to consider.

Skeeter head net
DEET
Consider bank line vs paracord
Consider flies and fly leader.
2nd the eyewash and cup.
water bibb key
cheap headlamp
Combination knife/spear (cold steel bushman)
Combination mirror/compass (Silva Ranger).
Alum block - Anti chafe anti microbial for pits and groin. Also stops minor bleeding.
iodine water tabs.
Salt
Benedryl for sinus, shock, insect bite reaction control.
Baking soda as tooth paste and antacid.
Complete mineral supplement. - Without Magnesium etc, your heart stops beating.
SWAT tourniquet (as a large rubber strip can serve several purposes beyond TK or compression, or sling, or catapult engine, trap spring, splint binding, ad hoc handle wrap)
Multitool - Rebar or swiss spirit, or just some needlenose pliers (sewing needle driver, wire cutter, pot lifeter etc).
Lose the cheap trash bags in favor of a HD bag.
Consider a Datrex ration block.
More coffee. and coffee filters.
.22 target pistol.
Couple ready made snares and a conibear or leg hold trap.
Fishing seine.
frog gig.
Small hatchet. or spetznaz shovel.
cell phone charger (batts, solar, wall plug)
Screwdriver or small pry tool.
Couple simple Lock picks / tension wrenches
Is your pack waterproof? Will your TP and expanding cloth towels be water damaged?
Pad to kneel or sit on.
Small earbud radio.
First aid kit seems overdone. Missing moleskin. Make due with some duct tape, AB pads, SWAT TK, triple antibiotic, alcol and benzoyl peroxide wipes, couple aspirin, prescription meds, splinter tweezers, jewelers loupe magnifier, little plastic bottle monkey blood (povo iodine).

At some point a cart might make sense.
Saw this invention the other day.
HipStar
https://thegadgetflow.com/portfolio/hands-free-travel-cart/
 

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First aid kit seems overdone.
Overdone for what?

That is my point. I have both much more medical gear....and much less depending on what I'm doing.

Some of it like the TQ, chest seal and ab pads your never going to use on yourself or on anyone who is going to live if you don't find definitive care.

I have used all three of those items, and in every case they would have done no good without a hospital within a couple hours time...and over 12 years I can still count the number I times I've used them on one hand.

But you could end up using it all on a car wreck you come across on your way home, or on another survivor with a gunshot wound.

But if your not planning on keeping the bag with you or not planning on helping others....then sure...you don't need it.

Its the plan you have to figure out if you want to start cutting things out. A good plan needs the least gear, while no plan needs the most.

What kind of survivor are you going to be? Answer that and then build your kits.

The standard BOB seems to go with the idea of doing everything you would possibly need to to do...but since there is a weight limit that means doing it all poorly. Better than nothing but is anyones life really so up in the air that they can't focus their preps more than that?
 

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Wile E Coyote, Genius.
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Well, if you are planning to get shot in the chest and then stepping on a land mine, it is about right. :)

If the plan is a 3 day hike then you might not need that stuff. Like you say, if 911 is not working and you get that damaged, you are done for. reducing the load a bit however, is always better. To me, 65 lbs is light for a bob, but I'm suggesting he consider adding a big knife, multi tool, a gun, alum block and moleskin, salt, mineral tablets, Benedryl and maybe a spetnaz shovel and a proper animal trap. So tried to reduce some load in other areas, like the roll of trash bags, combat TK, chest seals, quick clot, IV bags, heart monitor, 2 razors, hand cranked shortwave radio, multiple flashlights, pooper scooper... :) kidding.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
What is your bug out plan?

A person simply cannot carry everything they would need to be ready for everything on their back and be able to move very far or very fast.

So instead you make plans which can point in certain directions for gear.

Nothing you have appears useless but much of it you may not need or may not have close to enough of depending on what your bug out plan is.

Personally, I do not have one bug out bag at all but several for different things, about 500lbs worth of stuff all together.

I would never bug out on foot unless forced to, in which case most of that gets left behind, but since that is a worse case scenario I have bags of other gear ready for a more plausible vehicle bug out where I could take months worth of food and enough tools to build a cabin.

But I also have a 8lb ditch bag with little more than bandaids, a single meal, fire kit and rain poncho for times when a even a backpack may be too much.

So it all depends on what your plan is.

My plan is to bug in unless or until I can't and then bug out only if I must. Bugout by vehicle and only walking if I have too. That being said, I need to be able to hump my BOB. Two backpacking trips ago I did 21 miles, I was only rucked about 7 or 8 of it, and then only about 35 to 40 pounds. I will be doing some trips with the BOB once the ILBE comes in.


I will say, seconded on having a multitool, I don't leave my house without one and use it constantly. I find more uses for pliers than I do a knife honestly.

EDC for me is a Leatherman black oxide Rebar, it is ALWAYS on me; so multitool is covered.


My ditch bag has very little in it but it does have goggles and a 'buff' facemask/bandana. Smoke, dust, things flying through the air etc is a pretty common denominator of disaster.
I didn't see tweezers very handy for splinters you will get by not having leather or mechanic gloves. Bottle of eye wash because you don't have eye protection. Bandanna because you don't have a dust mask.
Dust mask good call: I have packable N95s in my NBC kit, I will include one in the BOB. I just noticed it's not on my list but I do have a triangle bandage in my first aid kit that could be used as a bandanna.
Tweezers, also an over-site


No multi tool? I hope you have really strong fingers so you can sew up your shoe. I sew everything in the field with dental floss 2 to 10 strands - the un waxed will take your seam sealer.

You can make buttons in the field, plastic or wood will work.

EDC for me is a Leatherman black oxide Rebar, it is ALWAYS on me; so multitool is covered.
I could rework the sewing kit to include just dental floss and needles. I got rid of the seam sealer to save weight.



Bailing wire - I'd want braided cable - makes better traps/snares.
I will look into the braided cable, it would make much better traps/snares

1 Quik clot, chest seal, ab pad is enough, personally if you are shot up that bad you're done - if its for someone else use their stuff or make do.
Possibly I went overboard on the first aid kit :), it started as an IFAK/Blowout kit on my FLC and just kept growing. It's a good kit, maybe I'll pull that one and build a much paired down one

A two sided stone will work better than 1 grit.
Will look into getting a small size one

For 65# I'd want more food.
More food? I have 13 meals in there.
A couple of heavy duty contractor bags will be way more useful than a roll of cheap garbage sacks.
My sleeping bag and clothes are in two separate contractors bags within the pack, so I do have two of those at my disposal.


You should on multi purpose/tasking example cotton balls with like chap stick in pill bottle - fire starting, lips and bait.
Good Idea!!

Its late and I'm tired. I suggest you live out of that pack as much as you for several days and see what you actually use.
I will be for sure, I've lived out of my REI XT-85 for days at a time. But I usually know when I'm coming home.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Overdone for what?

That is my point. I have both much more medical gear....and much less depending on what I'm doing.

Some of it like the TQ, chest seal and ab pads your never going to use on yourself or on anyone who is going to live if you don't find definitive care.

I have used all three of those items, and in every case they would have done no good without a hospital within a couple hours time...and over 12 years I can still count the number I times I've used them on one hand.

But you could end up using it all on a car wreck you come across on your way home, or on another survivor with a gunshot wound.

But if your not planning on keeping the bag with you or not planning on helping others....then sure...you don't need it.

Its the plan you have to figure out if you want to start cutting things out. A good plan needs the least gear, while no plan needs the most.

What kind of survivor are you going to be? Answer that and then build your kits.

The standard BOB seems to go with the idea of doing everything you would possibly need to to do...but since there is a weight limit that means doing it all poorly. Better than nothing but is anyones life really so up in the air that they can't focus their preps more than that?
Yes, that makes sense. I guess the idea is to make the most versatile well rounded BOB. But just end up throwing crap in there.
 

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If the plan is a 3 day hike then you might not need that stuff.
Indeed. You could do that with just a large bottle of water and a map most times of year, and maybe by not taking all that stuff it turns into only a two day hike.

If thats your plan....

Otherwise a BOB becomes just a whole bunch of useful stuff...which is okay but nobody can really say too much about its value or not if its for literally any possibility.

A better question than "What do you think of my BOB" is "What do you think I can do with this BOB"

Or alternatively. "I think I need to do this, what stuff should I pack?"
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well, if you are planning to get shot in the chest and then stepping on a land mine, it is about right. :)

If the plan is a 3 day hike then you might not need that stuff. Like you say, if 911 is not working and you get that damaged, you are done for. reducing the load a bit however, is always better. To me, 65 lbs is light for a bob, but I'm suggesting he consider adding a big knife, multi tool, a gun, alum block and moleskin, salt, mineral tablets, Benedryl and maybe a spetnaz shovel and a proper animal trap. So tried to reduce some load in other areas, like the roll of trash bags, combat TK, chest seals, quick clot, IV bags, heart monitor, 2 razors, hand cranked shortwave radio, multiple flashlights, pooper scooper... :) kidding.
Lol....true....that firstaid kit started as an IFAK/Blowout kit on my FLC. so it was more geared toward gunshots, chest wounds, and bleeders. I have a smaller IFAK I will use. I do have moleskin in the blister kit.
To be fair I don't have an entire roll of garbage bags in there just a partial, about 10 bags. I have an e-tool, but it's heavy so I removed it and went with the "pooper scooper" :)
I do have a large survival knife, it's a tank and much too heavy. I'm going to order a Gerber LMF or similar.
I do have a small hand crank radio, some shortwave freqs on it......not removing that. It's small and light.
The razors were removed a while back.

The list I put up was dated by a couple of months, I must have forgot to delete those.

Heart Monitor......., now that STAYS :)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Just a few items to consider.

Skeeter head netgood
DEETyes, I carry when backpacking
Consider bank line vs paracordwill have to look into that
Consider flies and fly leader.
2nd the eyewash and cup.
water bibb key
cheap headlampit's in the BOB
Combination knife/spear (cold steel bushman)
Combination mirror/compass (Silva Ranger).
Alum block - Anti chafe anti microbial for pits and groin. Also stops minor bleeding.
iodine water tabs.already have, in the canteen cover pouch
Salt
Benedryl for sinus, shock, insect bite reaction control.
Baking soda as tooth paste and antacid.YES, I used to use that as an antacid all the time, it works great
Complete mineral supplement. - Without Magnesium etc, your heart stops beating.
SWAT tourniquet (as a large rubber strip can serve several purposes beyond TK or compression, or sling, or catapult engine, trap spring, splint binding, ad hoc handle wrap)
Multitool - Rebar or swiss spirit, or just some needlenose pliers (sewing needle driver, wire cutter, pot lifeter etc). Leatherman ReBar is EDC for me
Lose the cheap trash bags in favor of a HD bag.2 already in the bag, sleeping bag in one and cloths in the other
Consider a Datrex ration block.I do have a bunch of similar blocks, they are heavy. I have some in the get home bag in the truck
More coffee. and coffee filters. I drink way too much coffee
.22 target pistol.
Couple ready made snares and a conibear or leg hold trap.
Fishing seine.
frog gig.
Small hatchet. or spetznaz shovel.
cell phone charger (batts, solar, wall plug)have a batt pack in the bag that will charge cell phone
Screwdriver or small pry tool.
Couple simple Lock picks / tension wrenches
Is your pack waterproof? Will your TP and expanding cloth towels be water damaged? I remove the expanding towels a month or so ago for weight, the TP is in ZIP lock
Pad to kneel or sit on.
Small earbud radio.It in the bag
First aid kit seems overdone. Missing moleskin. Make due with some duct tape, AB pads, SWAT TK, triple antibiotic, alcol and benzoyl peroxide wipes, couple aspirin, prescription meds, splinter tweezers, jewelers loupe magnifier, little plastic bottle monkey blood (povo iodine).YES YES, if it's one thing I will be doing it's shrinking the first aid kit, Molskin is in the blister kit

At some point a cart might make sense.
Saw this invention the other day.
HipStar
https://thegadgetflow.com/portfolio/hands-free-travel-cart/
maybe just a donkey...lol
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Sorry guys after reading some of the posts I realized that some of the things on my list were not in the bag any more or not included. I have corrected.
 

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But just end up throwing crap in there.
I don't see any outright crap.

But a lot of stuff you may or may not need depending on what your bugout situation is, and since I know nothing about that I can't really give much specific advice on what you'll need. And most of the stuff you do have that could be left behind fairly safely, like your repair kit, is also so light and small its not likely to matter much.

You mention that your med kit started out as a gunshot kit.

Do you have a plan to shoot back?

Gun shot kits imply that you have won a gunfight but been hit. Chest seals, and tourniquets imply that you are going to receive advanced care within hours.

A plan to get shot but no way to win said gunfight works in a world with police or military.

A plan to stabilize a serious wound is great in a world with hospitals.

Again, I won't say these are useless, if you keep this BOB in your car its entirely possible that you could get shot for some reason pre SHTF and need that stuff, or arrive on a shooting victim and need it.

Now, bugging out into the wilderness following the collapse of civilization...ehh...not likely to save anyones life from a gunshot that needs a chest seal, ab pad or TQ, and your not doing any first aid for a gunshot unless you have a gun of your own to win the fight first.

Its worth it to have in your car kit, but probably not your hiking kit. A world without cars is probably going to be one without hospitals.

Its still good stuff, its just not necessarily BOB stuff

But honestly, we are talking about a couple of ounces here, I'm just using it as one example of how good useful stuff doesn't mean that its meaningful for everything.
 

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Define your terms and your mission before you define your load.

Bugout? To where? How far and for about how many days of travel? And how many man days can you carry in terms of consumables (food, water, fuel, batteries)? What is your climate & season? What type of terrain?

Right now, you have a broad list of standard hiking/camping items, all of them useful but not all of them practical for a bugout. Why? Because you are basically set up for a week's duration hike. A lot of your list is stuff that you don't actually need for a hike that's going to see you run out of carried food within a week.

For instance, you've got a fishing kit. Unless you live in a rare area with waters full of easy pickings teeming salmon...do you have time to stop and fish enroute to wherever you're going? With little guarantee of return on invested time and expended calories? Probably not. Every day/hour expended on that activity (foraging) shortens your caloric reserves and eats up time. Time likely better spent moving toward your destination. Which is something you'd better have.

Like many people, you're invested in a bunch of small but comprehensive kits that aren't likely to be actually needed for such a short movement. Hygiene? You could get by with a toothbrush, a small bar of soap, and some wipes for your butt. Hell, for a week or two, you could get by with nothing but a wipe rag. Repair kit? How much gear do you see failing or getting worn out on a hike measured across a week or so? Duct tape, spare buckles, sewing kit, etc. None of it likely needed for the time frame indicated. Electrical? How many batteries would you go through in a week? Or two weeks? Why? If bugging out because you were driven from an original bug-in... you aren't going to be shining a light at night. At least you shouldn't if you want to stay alive and not attract trouble. Nor should your emergency radio be in operation that often. Snake bite kit? Are venomous snakes really a concern? Tent? If it's not winter time, do you really need? Extensive Fire kit for a scenario where you'd probably be ill-advised to light a fire due to security concerns (or perhaps tinder dry wild fire conditions)?

You're pretty heavy on the IFAK loadout. Think about it. You have a good list of contents for field trauma treatment (TCCC) while operating with an infantry platoon and supported by a CASEVAC system. But most of that stuff is for treating someone else. Because if YOU need multiple Quick Clot, Kerlix, abdominal pads, chest seals, pressure dressings, etc., you've got multiple wounds. Possibly through and through. Frankly, you're done... and highly unlikely to be ambulatory or even able to treat yourself. You could scale that way back and save some carried weight. Enough to treat a million dollar wound; arterial spurt; or an injury to a limb, hand, or foot. Single gunshot wound to an extremity. Or a sprain. Mobility kill treatment. You could probably benefit more from having an ACE wrap or mole skin than having a chest seal. I don't say that lightly as I'm a former grunt who spent plenty of time in Iraq & Afghanistan. There's just a point of diminishing returns when it comes to carrying supplies for self-treatment.

Typically, whether for a BOB, or for a recreational hiking load, you can save the most weight by adjusting one of the following big items:

1. Shelter
2. Sleeping System
3. Consumables (Water, Food, Fuel, Batteries)
4. Spare Clothing
5. Actual Empty Pack & Container Weights (lighter pack; fewer bags and containers)
6. Misc. Contingency Gear (where the Good Idea Fairy adds all those ounces into pounds)

You're good on Water, good on Sleeping System, light on Food, don't need a spare set of camo pants/shirt, carrying a fairly heavy pack (and sleeping bag carrier), and could get by without a tent for all but winter weather. And you've got way too much contingency gear for a load-out that includes only a week's worth of food.

Five quarts/liters is a reasonable general purpose load of water for a tactically uncertain ground movement. You could go lighter if you live in an area with water easily available everywhere, but 5-6 carried liters is safer for places where you need to go from water hole to water hole and dangerous people are about. As in nature, human predators hunt at predictable water holes.

Your list is actually good and most items are well thought out. I notice that you've a minimalist cook set and probably some military field experience from looking at clothing/item choices. All of your selections are decent choices. But you are trying to include enough items to take care of every possible contingency... which means too much total crap.

Answer those questions (to yourself) at the top of my reply... then figure out the maximum practical food load you can carry. Then figure the likelihood of needing all the contingency stuff. For a hypothetical 65 lb load, I'd expect to be carrying at least 30K calories = 10 days of 3000 calorie per day chow (or stretched out to 20+ days at half rations). That gives you a time margin to either: 1) get to somewhere safe where more food can be had or 2) attempt a foraging/hunting/fishing/trapline effort in one general area.

On the subject of food, you have to figure things in terms of calories carried and daily calories burned. A function of physical effort expended and weather (temperatures). I plan for 2500-3000 calorie hiking days during 3-season weather. Winter conditions bump that planning factor up to an easy 4000+ calories per day. Those MH meals deliver about 650-800 calories each. The Cheerios/milk powder & snacks a bit less. I'd estimate that you are carrying about six man days worth of 1000 calorie per-day meals. Meaning you are already into calorie deficit (and body fat burning) almost from the get-go. Add in some more calorie dense fodder. Peanut butter, olive oil, butter, nuts, tuna & oil, etc. You aren't going to starve within a week or two, but you'll get tired a lot faster when living off of short rations. Significantly tired. BTDT. Which means you'll be slower and cover less ground. And become more susceptible to things like sleeping cold or onset hypothermia.

Dump everything out on the floor. Examine each and every item (no matter how small or large and including containers & bags). Throw everything into one of three piles: 1) Critical (I'll probably die or be unable to conduct forward movement without this), 2) Maybe (Things possibly needed for unique SHTF or environmental circumstance), and 3) Nice to Have (I'll miss it, but I won't die or become a mobility kill if I don't have).

Things like pack, waterproof bag (for sleeping bag & clothing), food, sleeping system, water containers, spare socks, rain gear, water purification tablets, lighter, knife, light, foot care kit, or compass/map go into the Critical Pile.

Things like tent, water filter, spare knife, 2nd light, radio etc. go in the Maybe Pile. Some of these items are going to be situational depending upon season, terrain, or scenario considerations. For instance, an AM/FM/SW radio might be critical during some bugout events because you need to know what the hell is going on. Or you need a tent to weather winter storms.

Things like saber saw, redundant medical kit, hygiene kit, solar charger, bailing wire, sewing kit, repair kit, duct tape, snake bite kit, trowel, 3rd/4th echelon fire kit items, fishing kit, contractor bags, rope, etc. go into the Nice to Have Pile.

Add all the Critical Pile items (including food & water) back into your ruck... and weigh. This is your baseline carried load. If you're good with carrying more... first add some more food, then some items from your Maybe Pile. Chances are you'll approach your maximum load long before you exhaust your Maybe Pile. But if you manage to reassemble everything from those two piles... selectively pick a few Nice to Have items from Pile #3. To the point that you stay inside of your targeted carry weight. Discard everything left over. You didn't really need those items.

Which brings up my last point. Your comment: "It's a lot of stuff and a lot of weight once water is added, probably pushing 65lbs at least." You don't actually know and are guessing. Weigh everything and find out for sure. Get yourself an inexpensive airline luggage scale from Wally World.

After years of doing this (military field rucks and recreational hiking packs), I can lift a pack and judge weight fairly accurately, but... I still put the load on a scale and parse pounds and ounces. 65 lbs is a fairly hefty 3-season or even 4-season load. But for 65 pounds carried, I'd have a LOT more food. And a lot less of the other contingency stuff (kits, tools, implements, redundant items).

You have a good list. There's little to argue concerning the utility of the items you've chosen. You just have too many of them because you've let the Good Idea Fairy run away with the list.

Get rid of some non-critical stuff; add more food. You're going to get hungry before you need to repair things, shave, or change clothes.

[Edit to Add: One more thing... What's your plan for melting snow/ice (for drinking water) under frozen winter conditions? Esbits won't cut it and you might not be able to safely or conveniently light wood fires. Think about it.]
 

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Wile E Coyote, Genius.
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Just to add the normal comment on snake bite kits.
They don't do anything significant for snake bites. According to the experts.
I have nothing to add to that info, having never been bitten by a snake.

The Sawyer kit I've found useful for skeeter and other insect bites. Not sure it should be added to an already maxed out BOB though.
 

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If this is redundant, I apologize. I may have missed seeing in someone's post the importance of using ziploc bags. Keep first aid supplies in one to insure cleanliness, keep TP in one to insure it stays dry, keep extra socks and undies in one to keep dry. Carry a couple of empty ones so that if something does get wet, you can isolate it from the dry things in the pack. In general, these ziploc bags are helpful in organizing things. Why sort through all the fire starter items and fishing supplies to find tweezers! Think about each category of your collection and put like things together in one see-through bag.
I think you would have to be pretty desperate to leave the shelter of home with most everything you could need there. Be certain you have planned for everything you could face away from the safety and security of home before you "bug out". And then.....if you have three days worth of food and water in that bag, what happens on days four, five and beyond?
 

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Lone Wolf
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It all really depends on what your idea of "bug out" is. Personally I want a bag that I can live out of for an indefinite amount of time. For that, your going to have a 65-80 pound bag for sure. There's just no way around it in my opinion. I use an ILBE pack and have been very satisfied with it. I lucked out and got it brand new from Sportsmans Guide. My loadout is around 75 pounds. After looking over your list I see you've got a lot of good stuff. I didn't see anything about firearms, ammo. Also, what is a saber saw? I googled it and got results for portable battery powered saws. If that's what you've got, I'd toss it and get a folding saw (Bahco or Silky). For your fishing kit, you might add some yoyo traps. Also, do you have anything for trapping small game? I'd also get a small axe of some kind (Cold Steel Trail Boss is a cheap option). Finally, do some overnight trips (or longer) to live out of your bag using only it's contents and see how it goes. Make adjustments from there. Good setup overall.
 

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Lone Wolf
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It all really depends on what your idea of "bug out" is. Personally I want a bag that I can live out of for an indefinite amount of time. For that, your going to have a 65-80 pound bag for sure. There's just no way around it in my opinion. I use an ILBE pack and have been very satisfied with it. I lucked out and got it brand new from Sportsmans Guide. My loadout is around 75 pounds. After looking over your list I see you've got a lot of good stuff. I didn't see anything about firearms, ammo. Also, what is a saber saw? I googled it and got results for portable battery powered saws. If that's what you've got, I'd toss it and get a folding saw (Bahco or Silky). For your fishing kit, you might add some yoyo traps. Also, do you have anything for trapping small game? I'd also get a small axe of some kind (Cold Steel Trail Boss is a cheap option). Good setup overall.
Also (forgot to mention) you need a good pair of leather work gloves so your hands don't get ruined. I like to have a pair of wool gloves and heavy leather gloves. Gives you more options.
 

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1 quick suggestion

Hi, folks,
A lot of great info here, and I haven't had time to read/digest it all.
But, a couple of things did pop out as worthy of possible suggestions:

10. 2ea star wraps of green tough thread
11.1 cardboard wrap of khakie thread
12. 1 cardboard wrap of green thread

I would ditch the thread for more dental floss. It works great for sewing,
makes repairs that last incredibly long, and can be used for hygiene too.
Moreover, used dental floss can be saved for thread or other uses if still in good shape.

All the space/weight devoted to webbing repairs seems a bit much to me.
I might include 1 relatively short strip of webbing for repairs, and perhaps 1 buckle set. Otherwise, choosing high quality gear will probably get you through quite a lot of "adventuring" without need for repairs; and "field expedient" repairs can be conjured up when the need arises, without a complete harness shop at your disposal.

Hope this helps,
John
 

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Lone Wolf
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619 Posts
Another thing you might consider. That Katadyn water filter is large and there a lighter, longer lasting options out there. I've used those Katadyn filters a lot, but they don't seem to last long term while being hauled around in a pack taking a beating. The one I went with, and have used for a number of years is the sawyer mini filter. It lasts a LOT longer than the katadyn filters and is rated to filter smaller particles. It weighs nothing, and I have never actually wore one out. Might take a look at it.
 
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