Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
738 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone recommend any foraging groups or forums? If not we could start one here. Mainly I am interested in wild edible plants, native and non native. There is plenty of information for the top end, but very little to nothing for the cooler climes.
 

·
AKA The Dragon
Joined
·
2,818 Posts
These are a couple of websites with a few basic rules.

http://asgap.org.au/APOL35/sep04-2.html

http://www.sgapqld.org.au/bush_food_safety.pdf

Traditional use of Australian native plants for food and medicine. (publications)

http://www.anbg.gov.au/bibliography/bushfood.html

This is one forum that is still active, there are others that have not been active for nearly 12 months.

http://www.bushfood.net/

Another one which has a topic on native plants.

http://www2b.abc.net.au/tmb/Client/MessageList.aspx?b=72&t=4&te=True

A great idea though, finding and, being able to correctly identify plants, or prepare them properly for consumption. ie cashew nuts are toxic in their raw state, roasting preps are necessary to remove the toxins.

Have read a few publications, but the problem is, the illustrations or lack there of, make it very hard and, risky to identify them properly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
738 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Edible Plants.

Many thanks, I will check these out. I am a member of the bushfoods forum, but they seem to know very little about plants unless they come from the Territory.
You are right of course, identification is obviously extremely important, and many images are just not good enough.
I am not just interested in native plants, but also introduced plants to be used for the seed. Nettles for instance are a great veg, and they grow in most soil types. They are also it seems to be among one of the first plants to come up at the end of winter, and one post I read said this chap found nettles under the snow and still green.

Have read a few publications, but the problem is, the illustrations or lack there of, make it very hard and, risky to identify them properly.[/QUOTE]
 

·
AKA The Dragon
Joined
·
2,818 Posts
The Australian salt bush, some native and, some introduced.

Have used the "old man saltbush" myself either off the bush or in the dutch oven.. Graziers use it for livestock, it prefers an alkaline soil for best results, either lime or pot ash will help with acidic soils.

It is a great source of organic salt, very hardy plant.

This is a link to the many different varieties, all edible according to the search engine.

All very well illustrated with photos.

http://images.google.com.au/images?...isch:1&q=edible+saltbush&sa=N&start=0&ndsp=21

Edible Australian grasses.

http://images.google.com.au/images?...stralian+grasses&btnG=Search&aq=f&oq=&start=0

Edible rose petals.

http://images.google.com.au/images?...ible+rose+petals&btnG=Search&aq=f&oq=&start=0

Edible raw olives. In some areas of Australia, they are ferral, but have tried raw olives myself, it is definitely an acquired taste.

http://images.google.com.au/images?...ch:1&q=edible+raw+olives&sa=N&start=0&ndsp=21

Edible Brachen fern.

http://images.google.com.au/images?...ian+bracken+fern&btnG=Search&aq=f&oq=&start=0

Eat the young shoots.

http://web.tradekorea.com/upload_file/emp/200802/main/430270_main.jpg
 
  • Like
Reactions: Le Loup

·
AKA The Dragon
Joined
·
2,818 Posts
This is a link to basic tests for toxic plants.

Step one: smell it. If it smells of peaches or almonds it's poisonous.
Step two: skin test. Put some juice on your wrist and mouth to see if it causes a reaction.
Step three: taste just one. If you don't get any vomiting or diarrhoea after four hours, it's edible.
http://health.ninemsn.com.au/whatsgoodforyou/theshow/694254/bush-survival

Personally, i would prefer proper confirmation, identification of the plant, rather than risk the tests.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
738 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
738 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I don't think I can wholly agree with the info on that site, I mean you only have roughly 3 days you can go without water, and that depends a lot on your exersion and the enviroment. Depending on these water, shelter and fire can all be equal priorities. You have to play these things by ear.
 

·
AKA The Dragon
Joined
·
2,818 Posts
Certainly, with some of the hot weather we have experienced combined with activities, i think three days is too long without water.

As you said, play it by ear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Hey guys,

Tim Lowe "Wild Food Plants of Australia" is a really useful book. Ophidian recomended it to Grimelda (no relation, I swear :)) in a post about foraging on the Aussie forums. It has full colour photo's, and shows approximate locations within Australia.
I don't go out bush with out it.

Here is a link where you can buy a copy:
http://www.bushtuckershop.com/prod62.htm

As written under the "Good Points", it is most relevent to south eastern states and cool climate areas.

Hope this helps Le Loup.

Grim.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
738 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Tim Lowe.

Thanks Grim. I will see if I can check it out at the public library first.
Much appreciated.
Regards, Le Loup.


Hey guys,

Tim Lowe "Wild Food Plants of Australia" is a really useful book. Ophidian recomended it to Grimelda (no relation, I swear :)) in a post about foraging on the Aussie forums. It has full colour photo's, and shows approximate locations within Australia.
I don't go out bush with out it.

Here is a link where you can buy a copy:
http://www.bushtuckershop.com/prod62.htm

As written under the "Good Points", it is most relevent to south eastern states and cool climate areas.

Hope this helps Le Loup.

Grim.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top