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You can't fix stupid
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Discussion Starter #1
I received a bucket of Morning Moo today and it wasn't exactly what I was expecting. Milk powder is in a large HDPE bucket. No mylar bags, just poured in with a lid on the bucket. The bucket states good for up to 20 years. Not sure how this can be since plastic is air permeable. Plus, if there are oxygen absorbers in the bucket, the lid should be sucked down like a canning jar lid but it's not.
What are your thoughts?
 

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Beer Truck Door Gunner
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My concerns are the exact same as yours. Without a metal or glass barrier the oxygen will degrade the product.

Drop them a line and point out the obvious science, as well as your necessary new expense to repack it in mylar properly.
 

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Morning Moos® Low Fat Milk Alternative:

INGREDIENTS: Sweet whey, creamer (coconut oil, corn syrup solids, sodium caseinate [a milk derivative], dipotassium phosphate, sugar, mono and diglycerides, polysorbate 80, sodium silicoaluminate, tetrasodium pyrophosphate, soy lecithin), nonfat milk, sugar, guar gum, vitamin A, vitamin D.
 

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Beer Truck Door Gunner
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Morning Moos® Low Fat Milk Alternative:

INGREDIENTS: Sweet whey, creamer (coconut oil, corn syrup solids, sodium caseinate [a milk derivative], dipotassium phosphate, sugar, mono and diglycerides, polysorbate 80, sodium silicoaluminate, tetrasodium pyrophosphate, soy lecithin), nonfat milk, sugar, guar gum, vitamin A, vitamin D.
Milk powder of all types are notorious for failing early when oxygen gets to it.
 
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Where did you purchase it?

I ask because I'm concerned it may be another Amazon Third Party seller rip off.
 

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I ordered a 30lb pail from there website a few year ago and that was exactly how it was when I got it. I memory serves it did have a few of the larger O2 absorbers in the mix when I opened it. It tasted like regular 2% milk to me, but my cat didn't care for it but he is spoiled.
 

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I ordered a 30lb pail from there website a few year ago and that was exactly how it was when I got it. I memory serves it did have a few of the larger O2 absorbers in the mix when I opened it. It tasted like regular 2% milk to me, but my cat didn't care for it but he is spoiled.
`

I've only ever gotten the #10 cans. My wife made some up one time to test out, left it in the fridge. Kids ate it with their cereal & drank it & didn't know it was powdered. They said they were wondering why mom put the milk in a pitcher though. :D:

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A marathon not a sprint
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Morning Moos® Low Fat Milk Alternative:

INGREDIENTS: Sweet whey, creamer (coconut oil, corn syrup solids, sodium caseinate [a milk derivative], dipotassium phosphate, sugar, mono and diglycerides, polysorbate 80, sodium silicoaluminate, tetrasodium pyrophosphate, soy lecithin), nonfat milk, sugar, guar gum, vitamin A, vitamin D.
Makes me glad to muck the goats stall...
 

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Swirl Herder
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Morning Moos® Low Fat Milk Alternative:

INGREDIENTS: Sweet whey, creamer (coconut oil, corn syrup solids, sodium caseinate [a milk derivative], dipotassium phosphate, sugar, mono and diglycerides, polysorbate 80, sodium silicoaluminate, tetrasodium pyrophosphate, soy lecithin), nonfat milk, sugar, guar gum, vitamin A, vitamin D.
That product is a good example (and there are many) that don't fit the "Eat what you store" paradigm.

Should you eat morning moo all the time - probably not. Fresh dairy is a much better alternative that is also cheaper.

Would you be glad to have powdered milk products in a very severe crisis - absolutely yes.

Some products are worth storing (in cans or mylar with O2 absorbers) as long term preps that you probably won't (and maybe shouldn't) eat unless you really have to.

Some of the longest term shelf stable foods are poor alternatives to cheaper fresh foods - but still have a place in advanced prepping (ie large food stores as multiyear supplies).
 

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You can't fix stupid
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Discussion Starter #11
I had thought about just packaging the powder in mylar but the production date was 2 years ago. Once open, it's good for 1 year. I wouldn't want to package up milk that may not be good in 10 years.
I have messaged Augason back requesting a replacement, we'll see what they say. Worse case scenario, I just return it to the retailer for a refund.
 

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Beer Truck Door Gunner
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I had thought about just packaging the powder in mylar but the production date was 2 years ago. Once open, it's good for 1 year. I wouldn't want to package up milk that may not be good in 10 years.
I have messaged Augason back requesting a replacement, we'll see what they say. Worse case scenario, I just return it to the retailer for a refund.
Their answer should be interesting. Keep us posted.
 

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That product is a good example (and there are many) that don't fit the "Eat what you store" paradigm.

Should you eat morning moo all the time - probably not. Fresh dairy is a much better alternative that is also cheaper.

Would you be glad to have powdered milk products in a very severe crisis - absolutely yes.

Some products are worth storing (in cans or mylar with O2 absorbers) as long term preps that you probably won't (and maybe shouldn't) eat unless you really have to.

Some of the longest term shelf stable foods are poor alternatives to cheaper fresh foods - but still have a place in advanced prepping (ie large food stores as multiyear supplies).
See, I don't eat or store milk so its all the same to me. Storable food that doesn't taste good enough to eat normally doesn't get stored at my place.

If I liked fresh milk enough to drink everyday but not dry milk unless I had no other choice.....I would get a cow.

I just don't see any value in storing 'bad food' that is only 'good' if you have no other choice. Store good food that also stores well, and if it the food you like isn't food that stores well don't store a bad substitute instead, figure out an alternative or sustainable way to get it or plan on doing without.

If you live off fresh vegetables all the time don't buy years worth of freeze dried you will never eat unless SHTF....build a greenhouse to support your preferred diet now, and that same diet SHTF.

I just have an extreme aversion to investing in anything that only has value in SHTF. I'd rather live like it already happened than try live one life now, while simultaneously shopping for a different life in the future.

Perhaps because I am a third generation prepper and had to clean out my grandmothers house of all the stuff she prepped that never got used. The waste was sickening, all I could think about was how much better her life could have been if she hadn't been prepping. I never want to end up like that. And in her case, it was not because she had such an enormous amount of food stored, it was because it was all the kinds of food that she never actually ate, so it never got rotated and by the time she died at 89, most of it was bad. (Although some of the LDS canned pudding mixes etc was still good, probably because that stuff IS good and she had been using it and rotating)
 

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Swirl Herder
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See, I don't eat or store milk so its all the same to me. Storable food that doesn't taste good enough to eat normally doesn't get stored at my place.

If I liked fresh milk enough to drink everyday but not dry milk unless I had no other choice.....I would get a cow.

I just don't see any value in storing 'bad food' that is only 'good' if you have no other choice. Store good food that also stores well, and if it the food you like isn't food that stores well don't store a bad substitute instead, figure out an alternative or sustainable way to get it or plan on doing without.

If you live off fresh vegetables all the time don't buy years worth of freeze dried you will never eat unless SHTF....build a greenhouse to support your preferred diet now, and that same diet SHTF.

I just have an extreme aversion to investing in anything that only has value in SHTF. I'd rather live like it already happened than try live one life now, while simultaneously shopping for a different life in the future.

Perhaps because I am a third generation prepper and had to clean out my grandmothers house of all the stuff she prepped that never got used. The waste was sickening, all I could think about was how much better her life could have been if she hadn't been prepping. I never want to end up like that. And in her case, it was not because she had such an enormous amount of food stored, it was because it was all the kinds of food that she never actually ate, so it never got rotated and by the time she died at 89, most of it was bad. (Although some of the LDS canned pudding mixes etc was still good, probably because that stuff IS good and she had been using it and rotating)
All good points.

But to clarify what I am talking about, once you have achieved a few years worth of food stored, the foods you buy in addition to that (ie out to ten years worth and beyond) are quite specialized in nature.

They need to be foods with very long shelf life (10-30 years) and packaged in a way that also increases their shelf life.

For the last decade or so, each year that goes by, I have more stored food rather than less, and almost all those additions are food with >10 year shelf life (plus fewer replacements of previous short to medium shelf life items).

For me to maintain these incremental improvements in my stored food capability, and "eat what I store", I would need to exclusively eat 10 year old stored foods (and no fresh foods). Doing that would be less pleasant and less healthy than what I do now.

Currently I eat stored foods a few times a week - because I like them (but not to eat every meal) and to make sure I am well familiar with their use as food.

At least some of my expired stored foods are/have been used to feed my livestock and game animals - so it is sort of recycled.

But I admit it is more of a waste than eating it myself.

The amount of food wasted and dumped across the Western nations is staggering. The amount of food wasted by preppers by not or incompletely rotating very long shelf life foods is an infinitesimally small proportion of that waste.
 

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It sounds a lot like a tier sold product called Meadow Fresh which was available back in the 80s. It tasted rather good if mixed a bit stronger than the basic directions. I think it was more economical than real milk when purchased in bulk. It may be that one had to become a distributor to get the good prices.

I mentioned it to my boss at the time and he found a source for it as he had a house full of kids and needed some relief. Of course there was no emergency prepping in those days so prices were competitive. May be a coincidence but I think Meadow Fresh Farms were also located in SLC.

Roy Brog was CEO of Meadow Fresh Farms maybe Phil Augason had some connection, maybe not. Anyway I liked Meadow Fresh but didn't want to become involved in selling it and didn't drink enough to need to buy it.
 

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You can't fix stupid
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Discussion Starter #16
So after some back and forth with Augason, they are unwilling to stand by their product and product packaging and replace the bucket of milk powder. The bucket was shipped to me in a box. I suppose rough handling during transit could have jarred the bucket enough to unseal the bucket. I had considered opening the bucket, packaging the powder in mylar and calling it good but there's a chance it won't be good in a couple years. If I had ordered it direct through them, they would replace it. Since I ordered it from Walmart (where it was $38 instead of $96) their answer is to take it up with Walmart. I can return it to my local store but I'd rather exchange it for an identical item.

So I guess the lesson to be learned is don't order any items that are not in #10 cans or pre-packed in mylar. Also, if you're going to package yourself in mylar, only do so if you can verify the food is good to start with. In my case, the powder is good for 1 year after being opened but the bucket arrived 2 1/2 years after being produced and packaged.
 

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Beer Truck Door Gunner
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So after some back and forth with Augason, they are unwilling to stand by their product and product packaging and replace the bucket of milk powder. The bucket was shipped to me in a box. I suppose rough handling during transit could have jarred the bucket enough to unseal the bucket. I had considered opening the bucket, packaging the powder in mylar and calling it good but there's a chance it won't be good in a couple years. If I had ordered it direct through them, they would replace it. Since I ordered it from Walmart (where it was $38 instead of $96) their answer is to take it up with Walmart. I can return it to my local store but I'd rather exchange it for an identical item.

So I guess the lesson to be learned is don't order any items that are not in #10 cans or pre-packed in mylar. Also, if you're going to package yourself in mylar, only do so if you can verify the food is good to start with. In my case, the powder is good for 1 year after being opened but the bucket arrived 2 1/2 years after being produced and packaged.
Tell Walmart it is old product and demand new issue. Then mylar it all up.

I don't focus on LTS packaging. I'd almost rather they didn't bother. Just sell it to me as fresh as possible and I'll pack it up the right way.
 

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I received a bucket of Morning Moo today and it wasn't exactly what I was expecting. Milk powder is in a large HDPE bucket. No mylar bags, just poured in with a lid on the bucket. The bucket states good for up to 20 years. Not sure how this can be since plastic is air permeable. Plus, if there are oxygen absorbers in the bucket, the lid should be sucked down like a canning jar lid but it's not.
What are your thoughts?
Forget the 20 years. I purchased $100 and so did my neighbor. We both used the desicant packs and sealed them in #10 cans. After some 9 years the white color turned to dark tan and the powder was solid. Possible dog food. Live and learn.
 
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