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Does anyone have any advice on camping in the wild forest? Where is better and safer to sleep - in the hammock or in a tent? Have someone ever faced wild animals?
 

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Does anyone have any advice on camping in the wild forest? Where is better and safer to sleep - in the hammock or in a tent? Have someone ever faced wild animals?


Hammock or tent is going to depend on your taste, experience and location. If you're young and your back is in good condition you may prefer going to ground if finding level rock/root free ground is easy in your area.
I find a hammock to be a much better choice for me for several reasons: slightly lower bulk/weight, finding level ground where I camp is tough, much more comfortable. I camp in winter usually between 0 and 32 degrees, with my back and those temps I'd need a fairly thick ground pad to be warm and comfortable if I used a tent. With my hammock setup my -10 underquilt and 0 degree overquilt together are smaller than a thick groundpad and sleeping bag. My winter tarp,hammock and straps is a tiny bit smaller than my tent setup and a few ounces lighter.
All that adds up to hammock is best for me. You will want a pad or underquilt and there's a bit of a learning curve with a hammock so test in your back yard if possible first.
https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/content.php
is a great resource.
 

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Does anyone have any advice on camping in the wild forest? Where is better and safer to sleep - in the hammock or in a tent? Have someone ever faced wild animals?
Depends if you prefer tacos or boxed lunches.

There are arguments wither way. And may depend on what environment you are in. What potential threats you may face. I'd base my selection on other factors before worrying about animals. At least here in NA.
 

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Hammock or tent is going to depend on your taste, experience and location. If you're young and your back is in good condition you may prefer going to ground if finding level rock/root free ground is easy in your area.
I find a hammock to be a much better choice for me for several reasons: slightly lower bulk/weight, finding level ground where I camp is tough, much more comfortable. I camp in winter usually between 0 and 32 degrees, with my back and those temps I'd need a fairly thick ground pad to be warm and comfortable if I used a tent. With my hammock setup my -10 underquilt and 0 degree overquilt together are smaller than a thick groundpad and sleeping bag. My winter tarp,hammock and straps is a tiny bit smaller than my tent setup and a few ounces lighter.
All that adds up to hammock is best for me. You will want a pad or underquilt and there's a bit of a learning curve with a hammock so test in your back yard if possible first.
https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/content.php
is a great resource.
I hate tents too. Sleeping is one of life’s great pleasures, but it can also be tortuous, but too many tents have been my torture chamber. Often I experienced a bad night’s sleep due to rocks or tree roots sticking out under our tent. In a hammock you’ll sleep without having to worry about what’s under you. And maybe less animals can reach you..at least raccoons, squirrels or snakes will passing by. Of course, all food will be stored safely and far away from sleeping place.
Thank you for great resource!
 

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I personally use an Old Hickory 7" butcher knife. 13 bucks, can't go wrong.
Old Hickory seem a popular choice for a bushcraft knife, especially for modifications.

My current favourite is a cut down Cold Steel Bowie machete. Basically just cut the tip off to turn it into a 9 inch cleaver style knife. It looks badass!

The front 2/3 of the blade are for just hacking away at stuff while the 1/3 closest to handle makes for finer work. Though I do carry a Finn Hawk with it as well.
 

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Let's say I break the handle of my tomahawk or hatchet in the woods, right? What would be the best kind of wood to make a temporary handle for it?
Any tight-grained hardwood will do, and it will depend what grows in your area as to what you can pick from. For me, it would likely be scrub oak--not the best choice because of a more open grain structure, but it's hard, dense, and sturdy.

There are a few things to look for in a handle.

#1 NO KNOTS! A knot will be a weak point in the handle.

#2 Dead standing wood. Nothing green, nothing laying on the ground. Green will flex--it dampens the force of the cut. It also has water in it. It will begin to shrink and warp as soon as it starts to dry and your head will become loose very quickly. If you use green, it will need to be baked and tempered in hot ash for a long time before you can start shaping it in to a handle. Dead on the ground will tend to have rot occurring to some degree due to ground moisture. Your best choice will be main trunk near the bottom of the tree. It will be the oldest growth, and because gravity works, it will be the densest part of the tree. Depending on the tree, that may not be possible simply due to size. In such a case, a low branch of adequate size will work as long as it's dead and off the ground with no signs of rot or decomposition.

#3 As straight of grain as possible throughout the length of the handle. In other words, if you can follow the grain lines, grain that starts at the head of your axe/hatchet/tomahawk should carry through the entire length of the handle. Anywhere you're shaping across the grain (as in a line that starts at the head disappears half way down the handle) will be a potential split point because energy travels down the grain. This counts both for a curved grain that you want to make a straight handle out of as well as a straight handle that you're trying shape into a curve. Shape with the grain, not across it--start with a grain flow that already has the shape of the desired handle and you'll have less issues in the long run.

That's the "radio version"...
 

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Most Important Pack Essentials For Foot Travel

Greetings, I'm new to the site but have always been interested in survival/natural living. I plan on doing some foot travel in my home state of Kansas while doing some treasure hunting, and was wondering what some seasoned survival veterans might know about the best/most useful equipment for light travel. Multi-functionality and minimal size and weight are ideal. Basically I'll only be able to carry a backpack's worth of things while on my journey, and it will be anywhere from a couple weeks to a couple months in length. I may or may not have some sort of vehicle to help traverse. I'm not against stopping in towns to get food or shelter, but there's a good chance I'll be spending up to a couple days at a time away from civilization. I was wondering what some of the best tools or gear people know of that makes trekking or hiking long distances easier, such as hunting/fishing equipment, long lasting survival foods, camping gear, etc. But again only things that can fit in a pack. I'll have a metal detector and shovel strapped to my pack so weight is important.

On a side note I'm also on the lookout for a partner to join me if interested, I live in northeastern Kansas.
 

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i browsed a few pages for the same question, but do not have the patience to scroll through every page.
My question is: what is a good quality reasonably priced hatchet/ax to buy for bushcraft and camping/ survival? or what features and qualities do i look for when buying one?
 

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Does anyone have any advice on camping in the wild forest? Where is better and safer to sleep - in the hammock or in a tent? Have someone ever faced wild animals?
A REALISTIC answer is dependent on WHERE you see yourself camping?
Each area has its own fauna and weather.
ie, You are camping in SE Alaska.. chances are you will drown in your sleep in a hammock.
If you are in the desert SW... the odds are you will have not a lot of choice about what to hang your people swing on.
THEN
crawly critters, in desert SW with hammock you are above the snakes, scorpions, tarantulas, etc but in the north you want to be able to keep the black flies and mosquitoes away so a tent is a given.

As far as animals.. if you are careful it doesn't matter where you camp you can avoid issues with them. I have been all across Canada and most of the northern states on the ground including Alaska and never had a bear or other critter issue except when they tried to kill me on my motorcycle. (Idaho and Utah!)

Need more info
 

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Born 120 years too late.
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BEST BUSH knife for under $50..
You can buy 2- Cold Steel Black Bear Bowies
OR
2- Cold Steel BUSHMAN knives
OR
one of each and still get change back for your $$$$

I have dragged them all over NA and they are AWESOME for the $$$$
I have several Bushman knives including one I turned into a dedicated thrower. Nothing is harder on a knife than constant throwing into a hard object to stick it. After hundreds of throws the Bushman is just as straight and tough as it always has been.
They are one piece construction and I have no idea what it would take to break one and believe me, I have tried hard. They just keep going. Come sharp and with a little stone work you can shave with one.

When I go to AK or anywhere for outdoors I take one of each and then choose what one is going out in my pack or belt.

Best knife for the $$ I have ever seen.

2 different fixed blade styles, I have them both but I like the bowie style better.
https://www.knifecenter.com/kc_new/store_store.html?usrsearch=cold+steel+bushman

Black BEar Bowie
https://www.knifecenter.com/item/CS...eel-blade-polypropylene-handles-cor-ex-sheath
 

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Born 120 years too late.
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i browsed a few pages for the same question, but do not have the patience to scroll through every page.
My question is: what is a good quality reasonably priced hatchet/ax to buy for bushcraft and camping/ survival? or what features and qualities do i look for when buying one?
ARE YOU thinking of carrying/hiking with it or keeping it in the car for when you get to your camp site?
If weight isn't an issue then I would get a one piece hatchet because you break a handle it is not very handy.

Anyway, I have a short FISKARS axe that can double for both. It comes with a fiberglass handle and is VERY SHARP so keep the guard on it. Cost around $40.
 

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I imagine that for experiences sake, I'll not pack it terribly far until I get a hang of using it efficiently and safely. By then, perhaps I'll step up the quality and type of what I use. I've received a lot of recommendations for fiskars! Thank you for your response.
 

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best woods for fire making with a bow drill method?
I have not even tried to use a bow drill for at least 25 years. But I still remember doing it and succeeding after much effort.

I do remember that somewhat soft woods are best and they should be dead dry wood. People can add more if they wish. The best woods are mostly what I don't have on my land. The softest wood I do have are a couple aspen trees. Usually aspens grow much lower than on my land which is at 9,500 feet but fortunate I still have two aspens and one is at least 30 feet tall.

On my land I have dozens of fir trees and still a few pine trees that are still alive not killed by pine beetles. Those two not real hard woods will also work but the list below shows the best.
Here is a list that I have read for the best wood for fire making with a bow drill: 1. Cottonwood 2. Cedar 3. Willow 4. Basswood 5. Juniper 6. Aspen 7. Poplar
 
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