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Red White and Blue
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https://the-journal.com/articles/108671

***Gila River Farms primarily grows cotton and alfalfa, but in recent years has branched out to increase citrus production and experiment with olive crops, said Garcia, the farm’s assistant general manager.

Sauceda said alfalfa and cotton, which are the farm’s most profitable products, end up in such places as the Philippines, Vietnam and China.

“We represent the community with our products that go out the door,” said Sauceda, who’s only the second woman to be general manager. She and her employees take pride in being able to bring their product into the global market.***

good for them.
anyone ever had Tepary beans?

global marketplace yo
 

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I did not watch all of the films, but I amhighly interested. I am interested in learning practical lessons from the past that can help me out with crops that are suited to my climate and soil in NW FL. The original big native american farmers of the area were mostly wiped out during the time of the spanish and french colonization here.
Many of our current tribes are more recent migrants of say the 18th century from what I understand. There is quite a lot of forgotten history of what happened in La Florida.
There were the mound builder type cultures. Some disappeared before recorded historical contact took place and I suggest disease and social disorder propagated by the arrival of the spanish. The Hopi agriculture is fascinating, but it is adapted to low rain fall. We average 60 inches here. I probably need to look towards southern mexico and central american along with things in the Caribbean for the right plants and knowledge. Some of the Hopi plants will likely do well here anyway. Cactus for example like our climate and maybe some of the other cultivars of the Hopi might also.
Clearly a fascinating topic.
 

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Weed 'em and reap
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Amazing that hay could be the most profitable crop for them.
Not amazing at all. The population of North America in 1492 was below 8 million, according to the most credible research. Other somewhat credible methodologies put it at around 10 million.

Why was it so low? For the same reason that the Neolithic population of Europe could not have exceeded much the same number: The carrying capacity of Neolithic hunter-gatherers and primitive farmers of the landmasses in question tops out there.

Just for comparison, Europe proper today has a population almost 800 million, and the US and Canada well below 400 million.

So what does this have to do with hay? Quite simply, look at HOW our populations exceeded single digit millions: modern agriculture and civilization have increased productivity more than 100-fold. How? Partly by developing crops from their primitive state. Few of our food crops even remotely resemble their undeveloped forebears. They have been improved from sparse to dense, insipid to palatable, meager to bountiful.

Not so, however, with most fodder crops, which remain largely unchanged from the days when they were first grown to feed livestock.

This means that of all of the traditional crops grown, the ones that most closely match modern crops in their return on investment are the ones whose modern equivalents are not much improved.

Consider traditional farmers selling their produce in competition with modern farmers. They would be producing far fewer bushels of beans or corn or vegetables per acre, suffering more loss to pests, and incurring more labor costs. They can't compete outside of the boutique Whole Foods type setting.

But hay they can sell on par with their modern competition. In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if they make money on hay and use it to offset the losses on all of the other crops.
 

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Anyone ever had tepary beans?
Yep. I have 15 lbs in my pantry right now and another 30 or so packed in mylar for LTS.

We eat them fairly regularly. I bought them from Ramona Farms, which is the cheapest price I've found. I've been buying from them for 3 years or so now.

They are more expensive than grocery store beans, but they 'stay' with us longer (digestion-wise).
 

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I did not watch all of the films, but I amhighly interested. I am interested in learning practical lessons from the past that can help me out with crops that are suited to my climate and soil in NW FL. The original big native american farmers of the area were mostly wiped out during the time of the spanish and french colonization here.
Many of our current tribes are more recent migrants of say the 18th century from what I understand. There is quite a lot of forgotten history of what happened in La Florida.
There were the mound builder type cultures. Some disappeared before recorded historical contact took place and I suggest disease and social disorder propagated by the arrival of the spanish. The Hopi agriculture is fascinating, but it is adapted to low rain fall. We average 60 inches here. I probably need to look towards southern mexico and central american along with things in the Caribbean for the right plants and knowledge. Some of the Hopi plants will likely do well here anyway. Cactus for example like our climate and maybe some of the other cultivars of the Hopi might also.
Clearly a fascinating topic.
for your area i would look into seminole natives and others of the area.

one item they grew was seminole pumpkin..see article below..also look into any eastern tribe..items like cherokee black bean,bloody butcher corn and thers a squah in carolinas use to be grown cant recall name..but one of universities..i think south carolina has been dealing with seed saving.theres more i have forgotten...also a book on native american gardening by buffalobird woman..she was born in 1840 lived till some time 1910's.theres some interesting things there..a note from there she mention govt tried to force them to raise potatoes..they were unfamiliar items and they refised to eat them even when hungry. but we know some tribes had potatoes..especially in south/central americas..how far they were grow north i dont know.

be sure and read how pumpkins were grown..amazing

https://www.slowfoodusa.org/ark-item/seminole-pumpkin


book

https://www.amazon.com/Native-Ameri...=1535952339&sr=8-1&keywords=buffalobird+woman
 

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Elkhound I think the references that you are giving are likely the best that is available. Not sure how close they are for our conditions. NWFL has very little to do with southern FL. Starting in later 17th and through a lot of the 18th century many native american tribes were destroyed by the slave trade initiated by the English colonial authorities and planters. Much of this history can be found on youtube under searches for 'Secrets of Spanish Florida'. The Cherokees are an interesting group that may have theirs origins in british activities to control the southeast that including using native groups to raid other peoples for slaves intended later for sale to the planters.
People today that were told by their family histories to be Cherokees are showing often genetics that have their origins in spain with jewish and north african genes being present. This is for people still living in the south. My point being is that for these tribes was they entered FL and were coming from elsewhere and perhaps they adopted the agriculture of the former inhabitants. I do not know


Native Americans in Northwest Florida.

When tracing Indian ancestors in Okaloosa County, search the counties between Mobile, AL. and the Apalachicola River, FL. During the later part of the 19th century Creeks from south Alabama and South Georgia migrated into West Florida, adding to the small Indian population already present here. Some of those who were ‘removed,' upon returning to their home area tried to stay as close as possible to their ancestral tribal grounds. Florida Indians tended to live together in small family groups, usually in remote areas to avoid undue attention or trouble. This way they could also move quickly to another area if necessary. Creek country was from Pensacola, FL to the Apalachicola River; Seminoles were generally from Apalachicola to the East and South, the Uchees favored Uchee Valley and down to Ft. Walton Beach, FL. The Creek/Seminole people, more connected to the Georgia Creeks, centered near Perry, FL. They were not particularly close to the other tribal groups in the Panhandle. Walton County was a center of gravity in the Creek wars of 1836-37. Understanding what happened in the Florida panhandle in those years is most significant. http://bakerblockmuseum.org/nahistory.htm
 

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the best you can do is select seeds and put them in ground and start growing them out in your location. also i made a post about some native seeds i tried in a thread here about seed saving kev had started. i could tell the beans were old type genetics and done neither climbing nor bushing very well...they were almost useless to me in fact.


another thing..is to wear out shoe leather getting out into country side and looking and trying to meet natives and old timers.they often have seed going back thats been handed down to them.often these type folks dont spend time on internet.worse thing happen..new gardening friends in your area.

good luck in your search for seed.
 

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Why Not Ask FL Extension Service About Historic Planting Practices?

I am interested in learning practical lessons from the past that can help me out with crops that are suited to my climate and soil in NW FL. […] Elkhound I think the references that you are giving are likely the best that is available. Not sure how close they are for our conditions. NWFL has very little to do with southern FL. […] perhaps they adopted the agriculture of the former inhabitants. […]
Aka, let the U of FL help too!
My suggestions start with seeing what the Florida Master Gardeners write about plants that will do well in your area: http://www.gardeningsolutions.ifas.ufl.edu/index.html

As I understand it, the Florida Master Gardeners break the state up into three areas and have different recommendations for each one.

They may also have suggested resources on historical crops/planting methods. :D:
 

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Aka, let the U of FL help too!
My suggestions start with seeing what the Florida Master Gardeners write about plants that will do well in your area: http://www.gardeningsolutions.ifas.ufl.edu/index.html

As I understand it, the Florida Master Gardeners break the state up into three areas and have different recommendations for each one.

They may also have suggested resources on historical crops/planting methods. :D:
This is a site that I will have to study: https://search.ufl.edu/web/#gsc.tab=0&gsc.q=nwfl native american food plants&gsc.sort=
Some of the master gardeners know more than me and others do not.

What has been mentioned elsewhere on this forum is showing to up at native american cultural events that might be occurring locally to observe and ask questions.
 

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“Master” Gardeners

Some of the master gardeners know more than me and others do not.
The USDA’s Master Gardener program, offered thru your state’s land grant university, provides a baseline training in horticultural topics (for the trainee to disseminate further) but each MG will concentrate on topics of individual interest. So of course the mix of “expertise” is understandable. ;)
 
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