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Armchair commandos may believe anything sharp will make a good skinning knife, this is simply not true. *Certain types of knives are much better at skinning wild game than others. *Let's take a few minutes and talk about types of knives to stay away from and types to consider.

For most applications the smaller and thinner the blade the better.

The easier the knife is to clean, the better. *This should exclude multi-tools and knives with accessories, such as the Swiss Army knife.

High carbon steel blade that holds an edge and is easy to sharpen.

Examples that come to mind so far are the Gerber Big Rock, Gerber Profile, and Case pocket knives. *I have seen more deer skinned with a Case pocket knife than any other brand of knife. *Old guys do not mess around with fancy or expensive knives. *Experience says go with what works. *For most applications, a Case pocket knife will do just fine.


No Skinning Picture or Videos

Back around 2008 or so I posted a video on youtube of how to skin a squirrel. *The video was flagged as animal cruelty, the video was removed and my account was put on probation for something like 6 months.

After a few google searches I arrived at a forum where animal rights activist were working together to flag videos. *One member would post a link to the video with a description and what actions that member had taken, other members would reply saying they had reported the video. *They were like a pack of predators working together to take down hunting videos. *My squirrel video had been targeted by that group of social justice warriors.

I decided to avoid conflict and not to post any hunting or skinning videos. *This is also why I do not post videos of butchering chickens. *Also, I like my chickens and do not want to butcher any of them.

So my blog does not get flagged for animal*cruelty, I will not post any skinning pictures there.

Do not blame me, blame google and anti-hunting social justice warriors. *Hunting is a human right. *Not my fault human rights are not respected by rabid social justice warriors.

My Favorite Skinning Knife

For deer sized game, my favorite skinning knife is a Gerber Profile and a Gerber Big Rock. *The Big Rock seems to hold an edge better than the Profile. *For that matter, the Big Rock is a well rounded camp knife.

For rabbits and squirrels, I prefer a pocket knife over a larger fixed blade knife.

I stay away from knives that have a low carbon content. *I want a blade that holds an edge and is easy to sharpen. *That means stainless with a high carbon content, or a carbon blade.

Avoid These Blades

Serrated - Pulls the meat rather than slicing through it. *After a few strokes the serrations are full of meat pieces and it has to be cleaned.

Heavy large blades - Rambo style survival knives are not good skinning knives. *The blade is too thick and heavy to make precision cuts.

440 Stainless - Difficult to sharpen and does not hold an edge. *There are different grades of 440, such as A, B and C. *Rather than trying to figure out the grade the blade is made from, just avoid 44 stainless all together.

Multi-tools - Lot of places for blood and meat to get into. *Cleaning a multi-tool after skinning a deer can be a*time consuming. *We want a knife that is easy to clean so you can get on with your day.

Try Something New

I carry a pocket knife for about a year. *Then a*new knife is bought and the old knife is retired. *My current knife is a Schrade ST6C, before that it was a Leatherman, before that it was Klein tools 44003, before that it was a Gerber Paraframe,,, etc.

As for fixed blade knives, I like to buy a new one twice a*year or so. *There comes a point when you reach knife overload. *Going on a hiking trip and you spend several minutes thinking about which knife from the*collection you want to take.

Take time to get to know the knives in your collection. *Which ones work well for given situation.

When I go on a river camping trip and will be traveling by boat, I will take a heavy survival knife, such as the Schrade SCHF9 or SCHF36.

Hiking trip, Gerber Big Rock.

Regardless of where I go, I always carry a*pocket knife.

Take time to experiment. *Knives are tools. *Picking the right tool for the job makes life a lot easier.


Thoughts? opinions? Feedback?
 

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Wile E Coyote, Genius.
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You might like to try an ulu knife sometime, based on your comment about getting your hand close to the action. the eskimos have used them for years to skin their animals.

I bought a Schrade old timer exchange a blade thing at Academy a few years ago. has a ulu blade, a medium and small blade and a bone saw blade. I couldn't believe it was only $20. I guess I got lucky because it is usually double that or more.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3B42V4pJZ8
https://www.amazon.com/Schrade-PROM...7&sr=8-1&keywords=schrade+old+timer+switch+it



I also bought a real ulu, but the thing is too pretty so it sits on the mantle.

I have that gerber big rock also and agree it is a very handy size and shape knife for most things.
 

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The WR Case & Sons Cutlery Co. is based in Bradford, Pennsylvania.......my backyard. Last year we went over to the Zippo museum which has a nice display of historic Case Knives. Worth the visit.

My father always carried a Case Knife. I still have the last one he carried.

I currently carry a Bear & Son fourth generation toothpick pocket knife. Made in Alabama.

For hunting, I have a Schrade Old Timer, two buck 393 skinning knives and a Gerber which I like best of all.

I have a Canadian Marine survival knife that is impressive looking if not serviceable on a daily basis. But may come in handy should their be a Crunch.
 

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Third World'er Lunatic
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LOLO Heartlander.

My favorites for skinning, have been, and remain, Scherade Old Timer, The deer Slayer 150T for most work,and the 150ot for tight, Then the green River Buffalo Skinner, or the and a hatchet or Cleaver to spit up Joints and the breastbone.

Usually, if im saving hides, scrape with a ULU or lately a Farson Tool, Im going to try to make a larger one of those this year, the one on the market is decent for inside chopping, but lil small for the woods. for me anyway.

Usually pick up used 150's that need a cleanup for under 10$ older carbon steel ones,
Its a good handy design. Pay about the same for Green river or Robison Sur-edge B skinners.
 

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My favourites are Bob Dozier Pro Skinner, Grohmann's Nbr. 1 original, Nbr. 101 Standard Skinner and their Nbr. 105 Deep woods Hunter.

I'm very partial to Scandinavian blades by Helle, Killam etc. and wear one over my coveralls when hunting.

All of my uncles and great uncles used pocket knives for field dressing but always went with commercial knives for final dressing.

The biggest factor is the game in question? I/we use a different knife for rabbits and squirrels then I/we do for waterfowl or game birds and they are different from what I/we use for big game.

I've never had a problem using stainless, nor with partially serrated blades...You just don't use the very bottom of the blade--which I never use in skinning regardless of the blade type.
 

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Pencil 5, AUTOCAD 0
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I use a folding non-serrated Gerber Gator folder for all the big stuff, Deer, Moose, Beaver, etc.
I use a cheap little folder for Ducks and Rabbits. I like the rubberized grips on the Gator.
 

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I like my Havalon Piranta. Hard to beat the razor sharp easy disposable blades. I do have an old buck 110 that skined it's fair share of animals but now I alway use the Havalon. I say use what works and fits best for you, I would avoid any multi tool that gets all full of hair and gunk but that's just my opinion.
 

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I'll second the Havalon Piranta. I'm almost 70 and have skinned a lot of animals over the years - both hunting and trapping. I've used cheap skinning knives and expensive ones. Two years ago, I purchased a Havalon. I'll be using that for the remainder of my days. It's just that good. Inexpensive; easy to change blades; easy to clean; and nothing skins quite like it. Florescent orange means my old eyes can find it if I drop it in the leaves or leave it lying on a table.

Bonus: I can normally skin two full sized deer before blade replacement is necessary. Even then, you better be careful with the blade.

I'll second Highsteelman's comment: Use what works and fits best for you. For me, it's the Havalon.
 

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I'm not a hunter, but will be taking my first hog in a canned hunt this February. Would an Old Hickory butcher knife work for skinning?
Of course. Depending on the size and shape of it.
Those are great knives. Probably every bit as good or better than any other knife mentioned here.
Make sure it's sharp!
 

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Third World'er Lunatic
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I'm not a hunter, but will be taking my first hog in a canned hunt this February. Would an Old Hickory butcher knife work for skinning?
greenriver/robesons I like are a butcher knife/kitchen knife design. pair it with a sharpening steel to hit it from time to time, and a smaller knife, and that will do you fine.
 

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I own a lot of hunting knives and other knives - some expensive some less expensive, I might have too many if there is such a thing. I have skinned a lot of animals; everything from squirrels to lots of deer, moose, caribou, numerous grizzly bears and more black bears than I can remember. I have used many of the knives I own, but I think I have stumbled onto my favorite for big game. It is a "Morakniv Companion" made in Sweden, with a 4" blade and approximately 5" handle. The knife is very light weight but strong. It comes with a plastic sheath that you can simply hook over your belt or a button, very convenient, and it cost me all of $13.50, the stainless steel models run a buck or two more. If you start with the knife sharp you can easily skin, quarter, cut out the back straps, neck meat, rib meat, tender loins, etc., another words process a whole moose without having to re sharpen the knife. It has good steel that is easy to re sharpen too. I do like the "Piranta" or a very small "Smith & Wesson" fixed blade for caping. I would attach a picture but have not figured out how to do that yet - do not understand what a URL has to do with a picture on my hard drive or camera.
 

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here ya go TBE, till ya get enough posts. Mora companion, and Havalon Piranta (Black Stag)

lot of Mora Love on this board. from the Pathfinder on down. I like the LMF 9lite My Fire) series, first thing about it is it does 2 jobs. 2nd I like the grind on that model.

welcome to the boards:thumb:
 

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I lost my Browning duel blade folding knife with one knife blade and the other one was a bone saw blade. Got looking around and I found a Buck Knife 183 Alpha Crosslock Dual 2 Blade Folding Knife on Amazon for $41 dollars ($75 on Buck site) and it worked great when we got our two deer this last week. It has a good knife and a saw blade with a gut hook on the backside both were better than the Browning knife. The slip proof handle worked really good with bloody hands which surprised me.
http://www.buckknives.com/images/products/hero/0183GRS-B.jpg
 
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