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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's an interesting article that I ran across. It explains what a web browser tracking cookie can and cannot do. I'm sure most of the computer literate people already know this, but I'm listing it for those who don't.

Conspiracy theorists might want to avoid reading it, as it will probably shatter your delusions.

http://computer.howstuffworks.com/government-see-website.htm

"Imagine you're shopping at a mall. You browse different stores, make a few purchases and move on. Then, you notice that a man you don't know seems to be following you. You even catch a glimpse of him taking notes on what you're looking at and buying. The entire time you've been shopping, you've been spied on!

Many people fear that a similar thing is happening on the Web. They're worried that someone, usually the government, is recording and analyzing their Web browsing activity. They argue that these acts are an invasion of privacy. Are they right to be worried? Can the government keep track of all the Web sites everyone visits, and would it be able to act on that information?"

This isn't the entire article. There are several pages of it at the link. Here's a paragraph from later on in the site:

"Internet cookies aren't going to tell the government about every Web site you've visited. Some consumer news articles might give you the impression that Internet cookies broadcast everything you do on your computer to every Web site administrator connected to the Internet. The truth isn't quite so frightening. Internet cookies are small text files that Web sites store to your computer's hard drive -- they aren't computer programs. An Internet cookie gives a unique identifier relevant to a particular Web site to each computer that visits the site. The identifier lets Web sites tailor the browsing experience to your preferences. If you visit an international Web site that's available in many languages, you'd want to read it in a language you know. Using an Internet cookie, the Web site can remember this information. The next time you visit that site, you'll go straight to the appropriate version because the cookie on your hard drive told the site which language you prefer."
 

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Here's an interesting article that I ran across. It explains what a web browser tracking cookie can and cannot do. I'm sure most of the computer literate people already know this, but I'm listing it for those who don't.

Conspiracy theorists might want to avoid reading it, as it will probably shatter your delusions.

http://computer.howstuffworks.com/government-see-website.htm

"Imagine you're shopping at a mall. You browse different stores, make a few purchases and move on. Then, you notice that a man you don't know seems to be following you. You even catch a glimpse of him taking notes on what you're looking at and buying. The entire time you've been shopping, you've been spied on!

Many people fear that a similar thing is happening on the Web. They're worried that someone, usually the government, is recording and analyzing their Web browsing activity. They argue that these acts are an invasion of privacy. Are they right to be worried? Can the government keep track of all the Web sites everyone visits, and would it be able to act on that information?"
They do it often. That's one way they can figure out the threat level of terrorism in the country and how they stop some of them. Consider that you have NO privacy on the web and you will stay out of trouble.
 

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Information is Ammunition
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Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command- DOD said:
▼Never before has it been possible for one person to potentially affect an entire Nation’s security.
▼In 1999 (10 years ago), two Chinese Colonels published a book called “Unrestricted Warfare” that advocated “not fighting” the U.S. directly, but “understanding and employing the principle of asymmetry correctly to allow us [the Chinese] always to find and exploit an enemy’s soft spots.”
▼The idea that a less-capable foe can take on a militarily superior opponent also aligns with the views of the ancient Chinese general, Sun Tzu. In his book “The Art of War,” the strategist advocates stealth, deceptionand indirect attackto overcome a stronger opponent in battle.

Cyberspace is a Domain -The Principles of War Apply
http://info.publicintelligence.net/cyberwarfarebrief.pdf

if you think they won't violate the rights of us serfs in the name of state security- you're not familiar with Nazi Germany, Stazi East Germany, Soviet Russia, COmmunist China, ect...
 
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Christian
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Can they see which web sites you visit?

Sure they can, why would they want to?
 
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Information is Ammunition
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why they would want to is up to their agenda.
 

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Can they see which web sites you visit?

Sure they can, why would they want to?
That's always been my thinking about gobberment spying on us.

1) They don't have the man power to watch us all

2) Why would they want to know what Joe & Betty Brown are doing and what they like to read or if they go to flowerinmyyard.com or us talking about beans & rice
 

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That article seems to deal mainly with cookies. But if I'm not mistaken, Al Gore inverted the internet. Or more to the point this is one of the first national communication systems the was funded by the government. All the equipment to router packets was paid for by the taxpayer. Laying the backbone of the internet, as well as the format of tcp/ip was part of the original plan. With each packet having your 'home address' on it it's not to hard to imagine that the government doesn't need 'cookies' to track anything.

To divert every packet to a spy agency just seems prudent. Let the government supercomputers sort all this out and red flag anything of interest. Of course having a brother that works for the NSA kinda confirms these ideas. That and the multi billions of dollars that agency got after 911 to build server farms in multiple locations in this country is no secret.

One last little tidbit. All operating systems and software have to get the governments approval. For them to add a little code to something as large as an OS just seems likely. you can't even buy encryption software that our government doesn't know about or how to decipher.

I just assume that there is no way to use the internet and maintain 100% security from the government. I just believe that they can and do track everything that happens on the internet. I'm not positive but I don't think they have enough equipment to store all the information. But with everything going though their fingers they are bound to look at it.
 

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Information is Ammunition
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doesnt need to be deciphered if the company that designed it is leaned on far enough. There is also a proprietary law that allows the government to seize an invention patent if it is deemed necessary for state security. I can probably find proof of that again but at the moment I don't have it.
 

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Neo Confederate
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doesnt need to be deciphered if the company that designed it is leaned on far enough. There is also a proprietary law that allows the government to seize an invention patent if it is deemed necessary for state security. I can probably find proof of that again but at the moment I don't have it.
No, this is software written privately by a member of this forum.

OK here it is, I dug it up, I thought everybody downloaded this,

By ComancheSniper,

Hey, i don't usually hang out in the tech zone but i thought i should stop in and put the thread I started on the preppers threads here since it is about Commo and all.

I wrote a peice of software allowing you to encrypt text very well. it is Rijndael 256 bit encryption.

Anyway here is the link to the thread. Enjoy, it is free and yes, it is safe.

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=89574&highlight=encryption+software


Thanks again to this brilliant fellow.

Oh yeah, I tried it and it works.
 

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No, this is software written privately by a member of this forum.

OK here it is, I dug it up, I thought everybody downloaded this,

By ComancheSniper,

Hey, i don't usually hang out in the tech zone but i thought i should stop in and put the thread I started on the preppers threads here since it is about Commo and all.

I wrote a peice of software allowing you to encrypt text very well. it is Rijndael 256 bit encryption.

Anyway here is the link to the thread. Enjoy, it is free and yes, it is safe.

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=89574&highlight=encryption+software


Thanks again to this brilliant fellow.

Oh yeah, I tried it and it works.
I'd guess it something the government already knows about and uses.
I googled it and Wikipedia has this;
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Encryption_Standard

"In cryptography, the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is an encryption standard adopted by the U.S. government. The standard comprises three block ciphers, AES-128, AES-192 and AES-256, adopted from a larger collection originally published as Rijndael. Each of these ciphers has a 128-bit block size, with key sizes of 128, 192 and 256 bits, respectively. The AES ciphers have been analyzed extensively and are now used worldwide, as was the case with its predecessor,[3] the Data Encryption Standard (DES)."
 

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cleaning crew
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you should watch "golden eagle". not only can they watch but they find your weakness and make you do things, in which the sum of it all can destroy humanity.

seriously though, if the government is suspicious of you, they will find ways to know more about you than you know about yourself. of course, they would deny everything to keep their research methodologies unexposed.
 

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Christian
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I'd guess it something the government already knows about and uses.
I googled it and Wikipedia has this;
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Encryption_Standard

"In cryptography, the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is an encryption standard adopted by the U.S. government. The standard comprises three block ciphers, AES-128, AES-192 and AES-256, adopted from a larger collection originally published as Rijndael. Each of these ciphers has a 128-bit block size, with key sizes of 128, 192 and 256 bits, respectively. The AES ciphers have been analyzed extensively and are now used worldwide, as was the case with its predecessor,[3] the Data Encryption Standard (DES)."
I had a friend of mine take a suckers bet. He is the lead IT guy for a major pharmaceutical company, in short he knows his stuff.

I baited him into betting me $100 that I could not open an encrypted file on his computer. He was using PGP professional on a server.

I entered his office, and asked him to create a new encrypted file and leave a message on the file for me. I then left the room.

I came back and decrypted his file and collected my $100. He almost fell out of his chair. There were witnesses.

That evening at the wings bar as I was spending my winnings on beer and wings for everyone I told him how I did it.

want to make a guess?

Nope it wasn’t a keylogger. :D:
 

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Neo Confederate
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I'd guess it something the government already knows about and uses.
I googled it and Wikipedia has this;
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Encryption_Standard

"In cryptography, the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is an encryption standard adopted by the U.S. government. The standard comprises three block ciphers, AES-128, AES-192 and AES-256, adopted from a larger collection originally published as Rijndael. Each of these ciphers has a 128-bit block size, with key sizes of 128, 192 and 256 bits, respectively. The AES ciphers have been analyzed extensively and are now used worldwide, as was the case with its predecessor,[3] the Data Encryption Standard (DES)."
You'd guess?

Why don't you read the post, it is unbreakable without the randomly generated key.
 

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Forgiven
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By default, your browser caches images of the pages you visit on your hard drive. It also indexes the URLs in another file. Even if you delete these files, anybody can undelete them with a free utility until they are overwritten. That is why you see the CSI folks walking out with your computer in a box after your perp walk.

If your browser doesn't block or delete cookies, sites that leave cookies will give people a clue of where you have been surfing.

The sites you visit usually log the time and IP for each page viewed. Your ISP can help track that back to your router.

So...where have you been surfing? :):xeye::eek::
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Can they see which web sites you visit?

Sure they can, why would they want to?
The article was mostly about cookies. A lot of folks think they can be tracked by cookies and the article explains them and why you can't be tracked by them. To track us on the net takes a LOT of effort and manpower. I'm sure a lot of people are being tracked for various reasons, but not nearly as many as we'd like to suspect, and for a lot more of a reason than just because they own guns and store beans and rice.
 
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