Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Adventurer
Joined
·
19,333 Posts
look like it but i have never seen them grow so close to the ground like that

all ones i have seen are on 3-5 foot canes but the pic does look like them

i recomend going to your bookstore and get like a audobahn plant identification guide for the united states theyl help plant identification

is the stalk of the plant have thorns?
 

·
Sad But True
Joined
·
93 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
look like it but i have never seen them grow so close to the ground like that

all ones i have seen are on 3-5 foot canes but the pic does look like them

i recomend going to your bookstore and get like a audobahn plant identification guide for the united states theyl help plant identification

is the stalk of the plant have thorns?
they had bumps,no thorns that I could see,but the plants seemed either small or young,maybe they grow thorns as they grow mature?I am expecting a guide off ebay soon so thanks for that tip!
 

·
Come and Take It!
Joined
·
11,642 Posts
look like it but i have never seen them grow so close to the ground like that

all ones i have seen are on 3-5 foot canes but the pic does look like them

i recomend going to your bookstore and get like a audobahn plant identification guide for the united states theyl help plant identification

is the stalk of the plant have thorns?
Here in Texas they grow n tangally vines that are often close to the ground. The leaves look about right but I don't see the thorns.

Photographs are often difficult for me. I would probably taste them if they taste like a blackberry or raspberry they probably are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
610 Posts
I have similar plants along my fence.

i've eaten a few and i'm still here and never got sick/etc, so they are edible. They aren't very tasty though. The birds like them.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
Greetings All,

I believe that wilderness bushman has correctly identified the berries in the picture as dewberries.

In the genus Rubus, in the rose family, there are currently four categories of berries; namely raspberries, blackberries, thimbleberries and dewberries. These are not the only names of Rubus species, but other species also fall into these groups somewhere. The raspberries and thimbleberries are compound fruit that when you pick them, leave behind a kind of naked 'hub' upon which the berry was supported. In the case of thimbleberries, the 'hub' is so large that it is almost like peeling the edible berry off the very large 'hub.' This connective tissue is rather thinly distributed within the berries of the blackberries and dewberries group, and so leaves behind no recognizable 'hub.' The blackberry species are born on (sometimes) huge canes up to at least 9 feet (3 meters) tall. We generally refer to the blackberry-group canes that crawl across the ground as dewberries. In practice, dewberries are usually black when ripe and can have exceptionally huge berries with a rather 'wine' flavor. Keep in mind there are more than one species in each of these groupings. For instance, the berry we call cloudberry, is usually referring to the Rubus that grow as a tundra community member and develop rather red-orange berries, but is a member of the blackberry grouping in general.

As for terminology, all the members of the genus Rubus grow canes (proper term) that live for two years. [Whether the plant is a vine crawling across the ground, or a bush, or giant stems arching 9 to 10 feet into the air, they are still called canes (officially).] The first year canes are vegetative only. The second year canes produce the flowers and fruit and perish at the end of the season, except under one circumstance. There is a fairly large incidence of natural hybridization--the crossing of species, usually by cross-pollination of flowers in areas where Rubus are common and diverse. In many crossing combinations, these hybrids are sterile. They will make new canes every year, but these canes never bear flowers or fruit. The result is an ever-expanding bramble thicket that never bears any fruit, but spreads every year. They can be quite vigorous and persistent.

In the above photo by floss187, we are seeing black raspberry (I think), Rubus occidentalis with unripe fruit on second-year canes. What would have been third-year canes, are the dead stems hanging into the picture from above (mostly).

I hope this helps unravel this delicious, but sometimes difficult to identify group of food plants.

Thanks for reading.

edibleplantguy
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,823 Posts
Dewberries, they grow lower and faster on the bottoms of banks and edges of the fields. The blackberries grow higher at the tops of the banks and in the more vegetated areas.

Best picked in the early morning for sweeter fruit while the dew is still on them.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top