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Actias Luna
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4,229 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thought I read somewhere that rabbit manure does not have to compost before you put it on your garden. I am making a lasagna garden this weekend and I found a source of rabbit manure. Is it safe to use dirct? If it's not are there any?
 

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Titleless
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Its good that you are building a lasagna garden. They are really best if left to overwinter, which is why most are built in the fall. Any time is better than no time tho. Rabbit manure is very low in Nitrogen (N) so it wont burn plant roots or cause too rapid growth. Chicken manure is very high in N, so either apply it in the fall to overwinter and season some or use it very sparingly. Horse manure is somewhat higher in N than cow manure and used to be used to bottom heat coldframes by layering it under the soil in the frame. As it composted, it generated heat that allowed for starting seeds early. Not so much needed nowadays, but possibly useful for the future.

I like Lasagna gardening cause its lazy. Nature doesn't dig and neither do I anymore. The Lasagna method emulates the way Nature builds soils and recycles nutrients. Because the bacteria that breakdown the layers are in the soil, and the manure is what feeds them so they can accomplish the breakdown, the manure should ideally be spread throughout the layers evenly. It isn't rocket science tho, so don't obsess over it.

Slightly off topic, but since you are Lasagna gardening, you might want to try planting spuds without digging as well. Mow the area, lay cardboard pieces in a row, set the eyes on the cardboard and cover with a foot or two of waste hay or straw. Water well and don't allow to dry out until the leaves poke thru the top of the hay. Keep the waste hay at a foot or two deep (as it decomposes, add more). The eyes will send roots down thru the cardboard and set spuds on top of it. For harvest, just pull the hay aside and pickup the spuds. For that matter, you can 'noodle' some young spuds about the time the greenbeans are ready (when the potatoes flower). The plants will just set some more tubers to replace the ones you harvest early. Don't use the hay on potatoes two years in a row. Spread it in the fall for next springs beans or corn. Enjoy
 

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Actias Luna
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4,229 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm picking up the rabbit poo today, as well as the newspapers. I'll add pictures of before and after of the gardens. I also plan on doing two tater tires in between my lasagna gardens. We just built our chicken tractor and the chicks are only a month old so they aren't producing much fertilizer yet.

On another note, we spent the last two evenings planting my orchard. We've got 11 fruit trees in our front yard! I also planted a gifted peach by the patio and a mulberry out back. In a couple years I hope to be up to my knees in fruit, honey and veggies thanks to all the great ideas I've gleaned from this forum! :thumb:
 

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I have control issues
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7,095 Posts
Yes, rabit manure is the ONE manure that can be directly placed on your garden WITHOUT having to compost it first. That reminds me...I need to empty the pan under the rabbit hutch onto MY garden! Thanks for the reminder!
 

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Wanderer
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3,269 Posts
I understand rabbit, sheep, goat and chicken don't need to be composted before it goes on the garden, but go easy with the chicken manure as it's pretty "hot".
All other manure should be composted to kill the seeds and bacteria in it and prevent spread of unwanted weeds and plant diseases.
 

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Semper Fi
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2,808 Posts
RABBIT manure does not have to be aged. Put it on straight- its mostly alfalfa and grass feed... Keep 'em draft free though and dry. 4 females, 1 male- even 52 rabbits a year would be nice and the furs are great. For fur, harvest adults in winter. 12 a litter. 2:1 meat gain... 12 weeks to harvest for meat.
 

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My Temperature is Right
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Cow manure does not have to be aged, any cud chewing animal. Deer poop would be good I guess.

The others only have to be composted to kill the seeds that pass through their systems.

If you spread chicken poo thin and turn it immediately it won't burn anything, likewise if you mix it with compost and spread it. Concentrated it's like dumping a pile of soda of nitrate in one spot.
 

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Cow Manure doesn't need to be aged, but it does need to be spread pretty thin. It can turn the soil acidic really quick if not composted though. Out west this is not a problem, as a lot of the soil is alkaline, and fresh cow manure can be used to correct the PH and fertilize at the same time.
 
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