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the "d" from ban[d]
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Have most people gone back from 2 meter radios to CBs?

I know cell phones have hurt both.

I never remember either CB or 2 meter operators riding slow in the passing lane just so they can talk and not pay attention to the road. If I did not have so much to lose I would buy a jammer_maybe.
 

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I have CBs but rarely hear anything on them, unless I am near a truck stop. A lot of the loggers around here have them in their 4x4s, and use them when they are out and about in the woods at work, but for the most part they don't seem to use them in town.

The local 2 meter repeater is mostly a rag chew for two or three guys during the commute hours. I keep my radio on it, though, since I do live in the Cascadia Subduction zone.

I don't see a major move off the ham bands to CB, just the use of cell phones in town seems to have replaced it - out in the woods guys/gals use their radios [which ever they have] (no cell towers).
 

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I keep 5 handheld Baofeng in the gun safe, with extra batteries and ant.
I do much the same. I have a small "comms bag" in my safe which includes four UV5r radios, two batteries per each, a stubby and an extended antenna per each, a charger with A/C, USB and cigarette adapter cables and various antenna cable adapters. It also includes a rolled up home-brew "slim jim" antenna (450 ohm ladder line) with para cord to pull up into a tree or other structure.

I don't see a move from 2 meter to CB, but I have encountered more HAM Op's that have added a SSB CB to their compliment in recent months... I'm one of them. CB op's are more free to express their opinions on a wider range of subjects than HAM's. I like the "tell it like it is" CB platform. It shouldn't be a either/or choice. Both communities have their advantages and limitations. I do prefer 2 meter over CB as a backwoods highly mobile platform... small easily made antennas, potential access to repeaters and low cost availability.

People looking for easy-setup/low-intimidation comms and a ready-made community gravitate to CB and I think that keeps the CB market rolling along if not growing a bit. Sadly, I run into a lot of people with CB's in their vehicles and they know almost nothing about radio communications at all.
 

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Padre in the woods
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I would probably guess that CB radios are still used by a lot of Truckers today ,but what about the regular folks out there ? When i was a kid my grandparents used Cb radios like we use Cell phones today. My Grandfather had a cb radio in his jeep and my grandmother had a base setup in the kitchen.
Short answer, yes. Uses are wide spread from those who just want them for channel 9 and 19, to those who are using them for inexpensive comms for prepping or SHTF communications. You'll also find some who have used the CB platform, and cheap Chinese radios, for secure comms and even transmission of data. Yeah, not really legal, but in their world they are not worried about the FCC tiger teams, or other people's opinions, when unrest threatens them and they're coordinating for meeting up with others to hunker down.

I use CB when I'm on the road as my Garmin "Heads Up Traffic Alert" has lied to me all too often.
 

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I use CB when I'm on the road as my Garmin "Heads Up Traffic Alert" has lied to me all too often.
A CB does make a nice traveling companion... particularly if you're driving solo. The Uniden I recently put in my truck is the first I've had with scanner ability and side band. It was almost an instant addiction.
 

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My dad had CBs in the 80s when I was a kid. When he passed on I brought the radios home but couldn’t locate the antennas. I haven’t used them, just held onto them.

I have walky talkies but they don’t offer much range without line of sight. A few miles at best. From what I understand it’s taboo to use them to keep in touch in the woods while hunting. Which sucks because cellular phone service isn’t good in the north woods.

You need a license to operate a ham radio? Or what’s this stuff about having access to more channels and classes?

Never really occurred to me before but I know my state has hands free laws for mobile phones while driving, Never occurred to me if that affects truckers. When I drove commercially we had digital satellite radios. Pretty much push to talk mobile phones In the early 00s.

Obviously I’ve been living under a rock and the stuff being discussed is all new to me.
 

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Padre in the woods
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2,785 Posts
CB radios are indeed being used, correctly, as well as "modified". It depend on the individual's use and need. Myself, I use them on Channel 19 for traffic, and sometimes in cases where my son and I are driving separate vehicles. I have friends who don't use them except for SHTF situations, and their radios are modded for FM and off-band channels.

To each their own.
 

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When I was 12 a buddy and myself started messing with walkie talkies.
We’d strap a long, thin piece of aluminum tubing onto the antenna to increase our range.
When I was 13 back in the mid-seventies, I was already building Radio Shack projects.
At fourteen, I assembled a large 3-element beam antenna, strapped it to our chimney up high and ran coax into the attic to my downstairs bedroom. I could get about a 30 mile talk range off a cheap mobile radio, I’d sometimes get up on the roof even in the dead of winter to swing the beams, man that was a lot of fun.
 

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I use CB radios. Mostly for general conversation during drive. I have a set up it in each vehicle with 150 watts in one and 500 watts in the other. I also have a base CB setup with around 2,000 watts. I enjoy talking locally as well as when skip is rolling in. I personally try to refrain from the bad language and offer to help newcomers with any issues they may be having. And I think we need to get more folks on the airwaves and encourage younger folks to try it out. Here are some review of most powerful cb radio 5+1 Most Powerful CB Radios In 2021 (September) - Wholly Outdoor.
 

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the "d" from ban[d]
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I use CB radios. Mostly for general conversation during drive. I have a set up in each vehicle with 150 watts in one and 500 watts in the other. I also have a base CB setup with around 2,000 watts. I enjoy talking locally as well as when skip is rolling in. I personally try to refrain from the bad language and offer to help newcomers with any issues they may be having. And I think we need to get more folks on the airwaves and encourage younger folks to try it out.
Aren't you breaking the law.
 

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Padre in the woods
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Aren't you breaking the law.
You wouldn't like some of the people that open the radios up, as well as convert them to digital.
 

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"TURGID FLUX"
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You wouldn't like some of the people that open the radios up, as well as convert them to digital.
How does one convert an analog radio to digital? Digital at baseband? Even for an engineer, that is not an easy task.

So Jeep is pronouncing the end of 27 MHz CB? How so? Are they the authority?

Note it is based upon complaints about range and clarity? WTF? Hey Jeep, why not fix all of the electrical noise your vehicles spew?

Geez. I was going to buy a new Jeep until I realized how poor a platform it would be for any radio operations, even at UHF. There is only the hood for a groundplane.
 

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CB use in OTR trucks has declined greatly over the years.
 

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Padre in the woods
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How does one convert an analog radio to digital? Digital at baseband? Even for an engineer, that is not an easy task.
What some survivalists have done is to find the Chinese radios which have all the features, and then unlock them. On the QYT CB-27 (a very minature 4 watt radio pictured below), it's fairly easy.

They unlock the radio so it transmits from 24.500 to 30.350. The radio also has the ability to do 25K0F3E modulation. Then they will use a Kantronics TNC for the messages they send. The message below is one which my neighbor decoded after figuring out what they were up to. He's a ham, EE, and works in the biz. According to his post..."The transmission was decoded 10:22 Eastern, Friday, April 10, 2020, on the frequency of 26.312500 MHz in NBFM".

Font Paper Monochrome Number Document
Camera accessory Gadget Communication Device Audio equipment Cameras & optics


So there is the good old Packet data form, which I guess still qualifies for analog, but to any CBers they probably would not recognize what it was.

But there have been a few digital transmissions made which we suspect is either someone with a clever approach to changing a DSTAR radio to these frequencies, or someone who had married a digital technology to something like a MITREK or similar radio. This is going to be hard to crack since the modulation is unknown, as is their method of integration.

I should mention a few times between 25.5 and 26.5, usually around 26.105 +/- .015, we've heard standard FM with common/simple speech inversion, like the little postage stamp size boards you can put in radios.

There are people out there, mostly survivalists and preppers, who have gone to great lengths to stay off cellular, and hide in the noise with the freebanders.
 

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Padre in the woods
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2,785 Posts
CB use in OTR trucks has declined greatly over the years.
I'm wondering if the F.C.C. proposing to make CB FM, in addition to AM and SSB, will help or hinder. But you're right, it's nowhere like it was in the 70s when people had CBs in their cars and at home. I think I've seen only 2 CB base station antennas up here in town, and not all the trucks have them mounted on their mirrors. When I dial up to the CB frequencies on my ham rig, I mostly hear Spanish, probably coming from Central and South America.
 

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"TURGID FLUX"
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7,165 Posts
What some survivalists have done is to find the Chinese radios which have all the features, and then unlock them. On the QYT CB-27 (a very minature 4 watt radio pictured below), it's fairly easy.

They unlock the radio so it transmits from 24.500 to 30.350. The radio also has the ability to do 25K0F3E modulation. Then they will use a Kantronics TNC for the messages they send. The message below is one which my neighbor decoded after figuring out what they were up to. He's a ham, EE, and works in the biz. According to his post..."The transmission was decoded 10:22 Eastern, Friday, April 10, 2020, on the frequency of 26.312500 MHz in NBFM".

View attachment 381328 View attachment 381329

So there is the good old Packet data form, which I guess still qualifies for analog, but to any CBers they probably would not recognize what it was.

But there have been a few digital transmissions made which we suspect is either someone with a clever approach to changing a DSTAR radio to these frequencies, or someone who had married a digital technology to something like a MITREK or similar radio. This is going to be hard to crack since the modulation is unknown, as is their method of integration.

I should mention a few times between 25.5 and 26.5, usually around 26.105 +/- .015, we've heard standard FM with common/simple speech inversion, like the little postage stamp size boards you can put in radios.

There are people out there, mostly survivalists and preppers, who have gone to great lengths to stay off cellular, and hide in the noise with the freebanders.
That is actually quite clever. Yeah it is analog, but the old Kantronics KPC-3 Is very powerful and reliable.

I have toyed with the idea of some UK FM CB radios from the 1980s and wire a homebrew BCD FHSS controller to the 40 channel switch circuit.

Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk
 

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Odd that people say CB isn't used anymore. I see a lot of 4x4 trucks with antennae here. Mostly they are loggers or other guys that spend a great deal of time up in the GPNF or the tree farms. Must be one of those "location, location, location" things. I have CB, ham and GMRS radios, all have traffic on them of differing types ("truck one, leaving the yard with a load of 3" minus" etc)...

Each radio is a tool in the box that can come out when/if I need it. Why limit yourself to just one system?
 

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Padre in the woods
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I have toyed with the idea of some UK FM CB radios from the 1980s and wire a homebrew BCD FHSS controller to the 40 channel switch circuit.
There are a lot of the Chinese made radios out there ripe for hacking. The CB-27, when you cut the jumper, and reset the processor, will change it from channel specific to VFO through the whole band. There are also a few others which they use, but I would have to ask the neighbor for the make/model info.
 
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