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duct tape engineer
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Maybe I'm stereotyping (or speaking for myself) but I feel like it would be hard for me to butcher my own animal - but I've been considering it. It would save a lot of money, probably healthier than whats in the stores. I'm just wondering if I can actually do it.

Any city people doing this?
 

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MOLON LABE!
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Well, I'm not "city peoples," although we do live in the 'burbs, in a town of about 1,000. We can't have chickens :( , so wifey got me to buy her some rabbits. Little rodents are doing great so far, I even built them a rabbit tractor the other day and thus discovered a great side effect, free mowing and fertilizing of the yard!

 

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Sic semper tyrannis.
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Maybe I'm stereotyping (or speaking for myself) but I feel like it would be hard for me to butcher my own animal - but I've been considering it. It would save a lot of money, probably healthier than whats in the stores. I'm just wondering if I can actually do it.

Any city people doing this?
Does your local zoning allow livestock? Or can you just say they are pets? However then you could be accused of eating your pets.
 

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Token Hippy Academic
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I've been struggling with this, as well. I think it will come in two phases.

First, getting used to the process so that i know that I am doing it as painlessly as possible- I'm scared of screwing up badly and torturing a rabbit to death in my learning curve.

Then I think it's just a matter of practice and getting used to it.

I think I can do it, it's just going to suck the first few times.
 

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Si Vis Pacem Para Bellum
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Mmmmmm rabbit.
 

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who? what? me? No!!!
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I live in town and raise chickens and rabbits. we get fresh eggs to eat, I butchered 2 chickens this weekend, and we have eaten rabbit
 

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First thing you have to overcome is to realize that these are not pets. They are a food source.

It's really simple to dispatch a chicken. One way is to wring their neck or to take a hatchet and cut their head off. We have a stump with two nails in it about a half inch apart. Insert neck, pull on feet, chop the head off and toss the chicken aside so it will run around and bleed out till it falls over.

Take a boiling pot of water and dip the chicken in it. This will make it easier to pluck the feathers off. After you have it plucked, there will be real small feathers on it. You can use a propane torch to singe them off.

After that, it's just a matter of cutting the chicken up. This takes a little practice, but not much.

And you're done! MMMMMMM fried chicken!!
 

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It's all in your mind. If you do realize that they are food and not pets, it becomes easier. Keep in mind that God gave us rule over all animals - and that even when you buy a chicken at the store, you also helped kill it.

Meat has to come from somewhere.

I'd do the two nails trick that another poster suggested. Sharpen and clean your hatchet before you start - one stroke and it's done.

There's nothing better than the taste of free range home grown chicken and chicken eggs.
 

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Anyone?
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We're in the 'burbs.
We have 2 pairs of rabbits that give us about 14 - 18lbs of meat every month.
This is all out of a 10' x 10' foot section of our 10x18 shed.

We're starting with chickens this year, but for eggs only.

Yes, it's hard to kill the rabbits. But you get used to it.
As I told my son, this is where your intellect trumps your emotions.
You have to know that these animals live better lives and have more humane deaths than anything you can buy in McDonalds or Winn Dixie.
So, you keep that in mind and do what you have to do and sleep well at night.

BTW, it is some of the BEST quality meat you'll ever eat.
Chemical and antibiotic free also.
 

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Anyone?
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I've been struggling with this, as well. I think it will come in two phases.

First, getting used to the process so that i know that I am doing it as painlessly as possible- I'm scared of screwing up badly and torturing a rabbit to death in my learning curve.

Then I think it's just a matter of practice and getting used to it.

I think I can do it, it's just going to suck the first few times.
Any time I've seen those neck wringer thingies, it's been a horror show.
First off, as soon as their neck is captured in the thing (or under a broomstick if you're doing it that way), they start to panic. You can see their eyes bug out.
Then, you have to have the motion just right or they won't die right away.

Buy a good pellet gun.
Aim right between the ears.
It's messy and they have a hell of a nerve reaction, but it's instantaneous.
 

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Ephemerally here
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We are just starting - bought Eight Buff Orpington One Day Old Chicks, figured I would lose Two or Three.

Now, In Week Ten, all Eight are Thriving! Have moved them from the Rubbermaid Bin, to a "Corral" in the Living room , till the Chicken Dust and smell got too much - at Eight Weeks, began building their Run. Bought a $400 Coop earlier, thinking it would be right for Six Pullets....Now have Eight BUFF Orpingtons!

JUUUST finished the Chicken Run: Ten by Twenty Feet, and Ten Feet Tall, Hardware Cloth (1/2 Inch) up to Three Feet, then Chicken Wire up to the Ten-Foot Level. Brick Border against the Inside of the Run, to fall into any Tunnels the Varmints try to dig. (Raise Chickens, and all the Varmints in the Three Adjoining Counties Hear the Dinner Bell Clearly!) A No-Dig panel buried a few Inches beneath the Dirt on the outside Border, Two Feet out into the Yard. Electric Fencing Wires at Four Inches and Two Feet up the outside walls. Welded up a Ten Foot By Ten-foot Gate with Hardware cloth.

To help with the Eating/Processing, we named our Girls (I warn each of them Every Morning: "If You Crow, You get to meet Mr. Cleaver!"): "Ala King", "Chow Mein", "Kiev", "Teriyaki", "BBQ", "Yellow Legs", and "Bathing Beauty". We will Use Cleaver and WillSkin the Carcass when that time comes - Plucking is such a chore!

They are really Quiet - Much Quieter, than I Expected! They are Fun To Watch, Full of Antics. They Play "Keepaway", "Top Hen", "Watch This" (They do something stupid, like fly right into the Fence), and More. They are Terribly Curious - If I dig, they all come over to supervise. If I Drop something, they come running to see if it is something they can eat. If I Try to pick one up, they play "Catch Me If You Can"!

They are supposed to each give nearly 300 Eggs in their First Year of Production! I like Eggs, but - Sheesh! That is 2400 eggs in a Year, starting in about Six to Eight Weeks!

They are Spoiled! They love Hand-Feeding.

200 Dozen Eggs, If I sell Half at $3.00/Dz, is $3000. Might Break Even in First Year!

Really Looking Forward to those Firm, Deep-Colored Yolks, and Knowing that I fed Only Weeds, Slugs, Worms, Bugs of Every Kind, and Clover and Grass, Mice, and Snakes! None of that Sterile Food Pebbles stuff!

This is Kinda Fun! Love all the Fluffy Butts! One even Jumps Up on my Lap every time I visit the Run! Yanks on My Pant Leg Till I let Her Jump Up!

It is a Daggone Shame, I had to wait till I was 60 Before I became a Chick Magnet!
 

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Blame Canada.
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Maybe I'm stereotyping (or speaking for myself) but I feel like it would be hard for me to butcher my own animal - but I've been considering it. It would save a lot of money, probably healthier than whats in the stores. I'm just wondering if I can actually do it.

Any city people doing this?
Dont name them. That makes it harder. Chickens and and fish are easier then rabbits for me. I have a neighbor who does chickens. It amazes how clean it is.
 

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duct tape engineer
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
It is a Daggone Shame, I had to wait till I was 60 Before I became a Chick Magnet!
I didn't see that punch line coming - you made me cough on my coffee a little!

Prepping aside, I'm on a real kick this year of getting back to basics. Have been reading a lot on homesteading and want to put the practices into my burbs life. I'm very unhappy this past week reading that the USDA isn't going the test the way it has been - but then to even think that the testing that's going on now is anything more than a show is plain silly.

IF it were just me, I'd be vegetarian but my family doesn't like it and I'm ok with that. Organic meet at the co-op is wonderful but you pay so much and I'm trying to see how little money I can live on for food by growing and making my own.

To answer the question can I have livestock type animals - no. I can get away with a chicken on my property and probably as many rabbits as I can keep because they're quiet. Its all things I'm trying to work out in my mind before I do them.
 

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6 Boys and 13 Hands
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Maybe I'm stereotyping (or speaking for myself) but I feel like it would be hard for me to butcher my own animal - but I've been considering it. It would save a lot of money, probably healthier than whats in the stores. I'm just wondering if I can actually do it.

Any city people doing this?
Raising your own livestock doesn't necessarily mean you will save money.

There's an old formula for hogs that pretty much applies to everything.

You can buy your hogs and grow your feed and make a profit
You can raise your own hogs buy your feed and make a profit
But you can't buy your hogs and buy your feed and make a profit

Profit here is what you think you'll save.

I also highly recommend this book:
Amazon.com: Butchering, Processing and Preservation of Meat: A Manual for the Home and Farm (9780442203771): Frank G. Ashbrook: Books

It's a little old but it still is a very good book for beginners.
 

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Anyone?
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Raising your own livestock doesn't necessarily mean you will save money.

There's an old formula for hogs that pretty much applies to everything.

You can buy your hogs and grow your feed and make a profit
You can raise your own hogs buy your feed and make a profit
But you can't buy your hogs and buy your feed and make a profit

Profit here is what you think you'll save.

I also highly recommend this book:
Amazon.com: Butchering, Processing and Preservation of Meat: A Manual for the Home and Farm (9780442203771): Frank G. Ashbrook: Books

It's a little old but it still is a very good book for beginners.
That is great.
I need to remember that.

It's very true. My rabbit meat comes out to $3 - 4 per pound.

BUT, I'm not doing it for profit.
I'm doing it to have a source of protein on the day when the supermarket has none.
I do have some work to do to get them on greens, but that's coming.
 

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You can always say you're breeding rabbits as pets or, if you have kids, for 4-H. I knew someone in my 4-H club who bred rabbits. Got one as a pet from that family when I was a kid, and we lived in the burbs. 4-H does do things in urban areas--it's not only out in the country.

There are generally fewer zoning regulations for rabbits than chickens...just a thought. Rabbits make less noise at dawn.
 

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I had 2 hens, until somebody decided to anonymously narc me out to the zoning department, now my buddy has my 2 hens in his flock of 20.

Did I ever mention how much I hate busybodys that call the town for stupid crap?

I might try rabbits next year, i believe they are unregulated here due to being seen as fuzzy pets.
 

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Anyone?
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I had 2 hens, until somebody decided to anonymously narc me out to the zoning department, now my buddy has my 2 hens in his flock of 20.

Did I ever mention how much I hate busybodys that call the town for stupid crap?

I might try rabbits next year, i believe they are unregulated here due to being seen as fuzzy pets.
You can keep your rabbits in a shed as I do. My neighbors did not know until I told them.
The Storey book on raising rabbits (written by Bob Bennett) has some good ideas on stealth. I think he's actually in Conn.

Also, you can keep chickens in cages. So, if you have a couple of hens in with your rabbits....
Just beware of cross contamination. You don't want your rabbits getting near chicken crap because of salmonella.
 

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Not only chicken and rabbits but bees too. There is a large number of people having bee hives on roof terraces etc in London.

PS: We also have inner city farms which are mostly used for educational purposes.
 
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