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democrats = Hydra
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mention in another thread about burning corn.

apparently there are stoves, very similar to pellet stoves, for corn (grain only, no cob / shuck). I'm sure a regular wood stove could burn corn still on cob.

anyone do this?

here's a news article about

https://www.backwoodshome.com/i-heat-my-house-by-burning-corn/

***"In the past ten years, there has been a revival of a heating method so obviously efficient that it is remarkable how few people know of it: using corn for fuel. A corn stove does not burn stalks or left-over cobs. It burns kernels, less than a handful at a time. No, the corn doesn’t snap, crackle, or pop. (One of the things people ask is whether the corn pops as it burns.) Corn contains oil and ethanol, which burn cleaner than other fuels, and more cheaply, too. Once you learn how valuable this reasonably priced source of fuel is, you have to wonder why someone in the government has not caught on to the idea of using corn for more of America’s energy needs."***
 

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"TURGID FLUX"
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Apparently whenever I fill up my car with Regular gas at my pump it is ADULTERATED with up to 10% Ethanol.

That means the BTU value of my Ethanol-ed down Gasoline is significantly less meaning I am getting ripped off at the pump. Then my car goes fewer miles/gallon, I must buy more and I am ripped off again. So yes, I am using corn for fuel, but not willingly.

I also get the feeling my tax dollars are funding this scam as well.
 

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Apparently whenever I fill up my car with Regular gas at my pump it is ADULTERATED with up to 10% Ethanol.

That means the BTU value of my Ethanol-ed down Gasoline is significantly less meaning I am getting ripped off at the pump. Then my car goes fewer miles/gallon, I must buy more and I am ripped off again. So yes, I am using corn for fuel, but not willingly.

I also get the feeling my tax dollars are funding this scam as well.


You are correct sir...…………………..:thumb:
Same here in Texas...…...:mad:
Who ever thought, putting food in our fuel tanks, is an idiot...
Not to mention the damage it does to the engine...…...:mad:
 

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If you already have piles of it you feed to your cattle, you may as well burn it for heat too.

Corn is a commodity as much as a food. It's used for more than taco shells and sugar substitutes. Ethanol fuel blends likely came about because of CA and the problems of smog in their larger cities like the LA basin area. City people overcrowding. Without them we'd probably still be using leaded fuel.

We fed ground corn and cob to the cattle and grew sweet corn in the garden to eat. I have relatives with a corn stove, but the amount they burn is negligible compared to the amount they feed and the amount they sell. Probably not even a overfilled pickup truck load. They do have a propane furnace so the corn stove works more like a fireplace for spot heat in another part of the house. Spot price today is $3.69 a bushel. Might as well burn it. You could heat your house for the fall/winter/spring with corn for around $500-$1000 depending on the size of the house, your comfort level, and how cold it is outside.
 

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독수리 발톱
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I just left Iowa a few weeks ago. I was there on business. Corn fields as far as the eye could see, so I'm guessing that the entire state runs off of federal corn subsidies.
 

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reluctant sinner
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I have seen corn burning stoves in operation at the store. I want to pelletize pine needles, I could get paid to rake up my winter heat.
 

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Wile E Coyote, Genius.
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mention in another thread about burning corn.

apparently there are stoves, very similar to pellet stoves, for corn (grain only, no cob / shuck). I'm sure a regular wood stove could burn corn still on cob.

anyone do this?

here's a news article about

https://www.backwoodshome.com/i-heat-my-house-by-burning-corn/

***"In the past ten years, there has been a revival of a heating method so obviously efficient that it is remarkable how few people know of it: using corn for fuel. A corn stove does not burn stalks or left-over cobs. It burns kernels, less than a handful at a time. No, the corn doesn’t snap, crackle, or pop. (One of the things people ask is whether the corn pops as it burns.) Corn contains oil and ethanol, which burn cleaner than other fuels, and more cheaply, too. Once you learn how valuable this reasonably priced source of fuel is, you have to wonder why someone in the government has not caught on to the idea of using corn for more of America’s energy needs."***
Corn kernels contain NO ethanol. Otherwise you would get drunk by eating corn.
And it is extremely inefficient to grow a plant and only use 0.1% (or whatever fraction the kernels are of the total plant mass) of it for fuel and throw the rest away.
 

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Corn kernels contain NO ethanol. Otherwise you would get drunk by eating corn.
And it is extremely inefficient to grow a plant and only use 0.1% (or whatever fraction the kernels are of the total plant mass) of it for fuel and throw the rest away.
Inefficiency is not really that important. What is important to the consumer is cost. If the cost of burning corn is cheaper than burning other forms of energy it makes sense to have a corn burning stove.

Tremendous amounts of Ag products go to waste or are barely utilized. Through the years various methods of using the parts that used to simply rot away have been devised. In the case of wood pellets what used to be discarded sawdust was pelletized and used instead as a energy source. Once there was a market for this than wood, harvested that was not lumber quality, started being ground up to make more sawdust pellets for sale.

You used to see a fair amount of the corn kernel stoves for sale but recently I don't see as many of them other than the dual burners (corn or wood pellet) advertised.
 

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I wanted to get a corn stove in the worst way several years back but corn was cheap then.
Corn prices can vary a good amount and take away any cost advantage, depends on what your comparing it to. I have Natural Gas which is relatively dirt cheap and will probably stay that way for some time.

A disadvantage is they need electric to run the auger.
You need to store it in a dry rodent proof place.
I also noted a home that had one had a residual on the siding from the exhaust.

Bixby was one of the Cadillacs of the stoves if they are still around.
 

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Wile E Coyote, Genius.
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I wanted to get a corn stove in the worst way several years back but corn was cheap then.
Corn prices can vary a good amount and take away any cost advantage, depends on what your comparing it to. I have Natural Gas which is relatively dirt cheap and will probably stay that way for some time.

A disadvantage is they need electric to run the auger.
You need to store it in a dry rodent proof place.
I also noted a home that had one had a residual on the siding from the exhaust.

Bixby was one of the Cadillacs of the stoves if they are still around.
if the mice eat the corn before you burn it, you can just burn the mice. Well, not the whole mice... just their balls. :) Efficient! :)

Oh, how I crack myself up. :)
 

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if the mice eat the corn before you burn it, you can just burn the mice. Well, not the whole mice... just their balls. :) Efficient! :)

Oh, how I crack myself up. :)
Funny enough I have been watching a show about gold miners in Canada that are basically doing that. Millions of dollars in equipment and tremendous amounts of labor to process thousands of yards of soil to extract a measly few ounces of gold. Reminds me that the show is on today on Quest channel.

Something to occupy my time this afternoon. :cool:
 

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Corn stoves were selling like hot cakes when prices were under $2.00 a buschel.
When I was interested in them it was at $1.90 ...must have been a good while ago..time flies.
I pay under $50.00 a month on yearly budget plan for natural gas.
2200 sq ft main level at 74f basement at 68f , gas dryer and kitchen stove on gas also.
I havent ran the calculators on it in years but I suspect a long payback on natural gas.
Most farmers don't have access to natural around here and use propane which is expensive.
One farmer friend has a outside wood boiler and saves a ton on propane and said his house has never been warmer.
 

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mention in another thread about burning corn.

apparently there are stoves, very similar to pellet stoves, for corn (grain only, no cob / shuck). I'm sure a regular wood stove could burn corn still on cob.

anyone do this?

here's a news article about

https://www.backwoodshome.com/i-heat-my-house-by-burning-corn/

***"In the past ten years, there has been a revival of a heating method so obviously efficient that it is remarkable how few people know of it: using corn for fuel. A corn stove does not burn stalks or left-over cobs. It burns kernels, less than a handful at a time. No, the corn doesn’t snap, crackle, or pop. (One of the things people ask is whether the corn pops as it burns.) Corn contains oil and ethanol, which burn cleaner than other fuels, and more cheaply, too. Once you learn how valuable this reasonably priced source of fuel is, you have to wonder why someone in the government has not caught on to the idea of using corn for more of America’s energy needs."***
A friend of mine burns a 50/50 mix of corn and pellets. Some observations are that corn burns hotter/faster and also leaves more ash. You must physically inspect every bag for foreign items to make sure it is clean and you still shear more auger pins than pellets alone. A 50lb bag of corn runs about the same as a 40lb bag of pellets.
 
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