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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found a vine like bush growing amongst raspberry and black berry bushes. I couldn't find any "ripe" berries, as they tend to go dark purple and resemble a longer version of a blackberry. I tried a couple ripe ones last week and they taste alright. I didn't get nauseous or go blind so I dont think they're poisonous. Although eating a few probably wasn't the greatest idea.





 

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Actias Luna
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That looks like a mulberry. They are my favorite fruit, my kids and I eat them off the trees when we are on walks. They are about done here in zone 5. If you leave them for a little bit they will get very dark. They are extremely sweet with no tartness when ripe. Birds love them and will leave their mark on clean sheets.
 

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Greetings All,

There can be no doubt that this is a picture of a white mulberry seedling (Morus alba). The description of a vine-like bush is a description of a young white mulberry in heavy competition for light and space. This will eventually outgrow the competition and become a large tree, roughly 40 feet tall and mature at about 2 feet in diameter.

Even though it is a white mulberry, in my part of the world, only about 10% have white berries; roughly 15% have off-white or pink berries, and the rest have dark purple berries. Of course, I am talking about female trees. Since mulberries have male and female flowers on separate trees, the above percentages only apply to the half of the population that is female. Since male trees make pollen only, they are fruitless. They are universally regarded as edible and most find them delicious if picked when ripe (mildly toxic when unripe). This species of mulberry is the sole food plant of the commercial silk worm moth and the reason it was joyfully brought to North America.

There are numerous other posts in this section about this species.

Thanks for reading.

edibleplantguy
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Awesome! Thanks for the info. It is definitely in competition for light and space, so much so that it is hard to tell where the vines end and begin. Maybe I'll chop some of the junk down around it so it doesn't have to work so hard.
 

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it looks like it's in the same family as the Cloudberry when it comes to its leaves in the shape of its fruit.

And if you're in the Pacific Northwest cloudberries were a staple food for the people of the northern northwest coast. These berries were usually picked in Midsummer. They are stored underwater for long term in a cedar box, and sometimes they were scalded before they were put into storage
 
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