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Full loose Bozo
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Discussion Starter #1
I have been saveing three litre pop bottles and water jugs for food storage. I use them for rice, potato flakes, flour and surgar. I heard that the plastic gives off some kind of chemicals in the contents of the bottle. I have checked this out on Snopes and it said it was fifty fifty. Does anyone else do this? Or maybe someone has a better source of information that I shouldnt do this?
 

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Bleach blonde on fire :p
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Me for like 10 years at least LOL. I have posted several pics of my jugs here in several posts. It leaches into liquids mostly when heated, dry foods you have nothing to worry about.
 

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All mine are 2L. Been using 'em for years. Let's see....currently I have water, rice, beans, salt, sugar, and popcorn. Never had any problems.
 

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I use 4 3liter bottles in my trunk for temporary water storage. I only use them for a quarter of a year before tossing them out. There has been some analysis indicating that plastic polymers inside the bottles tend to shear off after multiple refillings. If you fill them with food one time, I don't think it will be a problem. You must, however make sure the inside is absolutly dry and stored in a cool dark place. You don't want things growing in it.
 

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Moms right. The leeching is mostly a problem with liquids. The sugars and flavorings from the sodas influencing the liquids you store like water for example. Beans, and other dry goods should not have much issue there.
What you want to avoid is water storage in them. As mentioned before said sugars promote bacterial growth in water over time and no amount of cleaning can get it all.

Not the same for plastic buckets. Most plastic buckets from say the hardware stores are not food grade like the bottles are. They have toxic mold release agents that can affect the safety of the foods stored inside. There are those who say it won't hurt you...... morons.
It's better to get dedicated food grade buckets and dedicate water tanks.
 

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population control
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I am a workout freak and use those giant 4+ pound tubs of protein and weight gaining powder. When I finish them I clean em out real good and use them for bulk storage items like flour, sugar, salt, beans, rice, etc. They have screw on tops and hold quite a bit.
 

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Maximus
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I heard that the plastic gives off some kind of chemicals in the contents of the bottle. I have checked this out on Snopes and it said it was fifty fifty.
I always find it a little ironic that so many people care about the possible chemicals leached from plastic bottles after SHTF. When realistically, there are going to be SO MANY WORSE things to be concerned about at the time. Dead bodies, no sewage, possible pollutants and toxins in the air. In fact there are probably a crapload of more dangerous things that we do everyday such as pump gasoline into the car etc.
 

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Whichever containers you use, you need to include either bay leaves or sticks of Wrigley's Spearmint gum to prevent the insect eggs which are present in many dry foods like beans, flours, and grains from hatching. There really is no such thing as the lesser of two weevils.
 

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Rogue
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I always find it a little ironic that so many people care about the possible chemicals leached from plastic bottles after SHTF. When realistically, there are going to be SO MANY WORSE things to be concerned about at the time. Dead bodies, no sewage, possible pollutants and toxins in the air. In fact there are probably a crapload of more dangerous things that we do everyday such as pump gasoline into the car etc.

Yea the one I always wonder about are the nuclear power plants spent fuel cooling ponds. Without power or people running those plants its only a matter of time before the pumps fail and the water evaporates away leaving the fuel rods to heat up into nuclear fires. The radioactive contamination would spread all over the place. So lets hope the S does not HTF to that degree.
 

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Stand Firm.Buy Safecastle
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Whichever containers you use, you need to include either bay leaves or sticks of Wrigley's Spearmint gum to prevent the insect eggs which are present in many dry foods like beans, flours, and grains from hatching. There really is no such thing as the lesser of two weevils.
This makes me curious...where did you get or learn of this method? I am always on the lookout for why something works.

Thanks
JP
 

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Full loose Bozo
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Discussion Starter #11
You would think that there would be more leaching from sodapop because of the acid that is in it. So wouldnt that be more dangerous?
 

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This makes me curious...where did you get or learn of this method? I am always on the lookout for why something works.

Thanks
JP
ISLP,
Aromatic oils, like spearmint, cedar wood, or bay leaves, have a tendency to affect insects. Spearmint oil is the active ingredient in "safe" wasp killers. And yes, it kills them just as fast as the nasty chemicals, and leaves a minty fresh taste!

Cedar, most people know, keeps away moths. Cedar is also used in mammal cages, like hamsters, to keep away mites and other insects. It is also used in dog pillows, to keep away fleas and ticks.

Also, many insects will avoid aromatic plants, like marigolds.

Oddly enough, various types of wasps are actually ATTRACTED to the flowers of my spearmint (and other mint) plants. The nectar from the flowers doesn't seem to bother them.

Some people like to place drift wood in their aquariums for decorations, but do not use any wood from the pine family, the aromatic oils will kill invertebrates like shrimp, snails, and crayfish. These oils are far more dilute in wild lakes and rivers so it doesn't bother them.

These oils from the pine family also bother snakes and reptiles, and should not be used in their cages.

While nicotine is not considered smelly, it kills most insects on contact, except, of course, for the hornworms (a type of caterpillar of the butterfly moth) which feed on the leaves.
 

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Bleach blonde on fire :p
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Moms right. The leeching is mostly a problem with liquids. The sugars and flavorings from the sodas influencing the liquids you store like water for example. Beans, and other dry goods should not have much issue there.
What you want to avoid is water storage in them. As mentioned before said sugars promote bacterial growth in water over time and no amount of cleaning can get it all.

Not the same for plastic buckets. Most plastic buckets from say the hardware stores are not food grade like the bottles are. They have toxic mold release agents that can affect the safety of the foods stored inside. There are those who say it won't hurt you...... morons.
It's better to get dedicated food grade buckets and dedicate water tanks.

Glad to know I'm right on something LOL!
 

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so refiling water jugs is a no no ? (i mean refill with water ? ):confused:
Better to buy dedicated food grade water containers. Water is a solvent and will pull nasty chems into your water. Why compound all the other nasties Vicdotcom brought up with an inflamed intestinal lining?
 

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VA / NC
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what if you store the food items in zip lock bags then in plastic buckets?
Yep Frank what I usually do is place dried goods in air tight sealing bags, of course sealed. Place in plastic containers with oxidizers, and then place air tight lids on. If you are not sure if the container is food grade - use something like the food saver bags.
 

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what if you store the food items in zip lock bags then in plastic buckets?
Zip locks are not impermeable at all. Vacuum bags like food savers are much better but they eventually still do allow air to pass through them.
Put a sandwich in a bag all zipped up good in an ice chest and let the ice melt. It'll be full of water in no time.
There is a school of thought that mylar bags might help but I am not a graduate there.
One of the release agents on non food grade containers is benzine. Nasty corrosive stuff and there is no one person on this board who can likely tell you with accuracy how that effects mylar over a few years.
Best just to get food grade containers and not have to worry.... no?
 

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Mean Old Lady
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I have four two-liter soda bottles on a shed porch, filled with water and sitting exposed to sunlight and weather - they've been there since 1999, and I leave them just to see how long they will last. So far, they still look as strong as when I put them there, although I suspect that the hard plastic caps are about to crumble. The water inside is still clean and clear, although I have no clue how contaminated it may be.

Inside the house, I store rice, salt, and other dry things in them. There is no protection against light, but you can wrap them nicely in a few sheets of newspaper for that.

While I agree that plastics should be limited where food is concerned, I don't think it serves a purpose to refuse it as a food storage option. Not in this day and age of petroleum contamination. The plastic surrounding our food is the least of our worries, particularly in a SHTF situation. Wherever possible, we use glass - but it is heavy and breaks easily.

I say get it stored first, then go back later and make changes!
 

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Full loose Bozo
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Discussion Starter #20
I have four two-liter soda bottles on a shed porch, filled with water and sitting exposed to sunlight and weather - they've been there since 1999, and I leave them just to see how long they will last. So far, they still look as strong as when I put them there, although I suspect that the hard plastic caps are about to crumble. The water inside is still clean and clear, although I have no clue how contaminated it may be.

Inside the house, I store rice, salt, and other dry things in them. There is no protection against light, but you can wrap them nicely in a few sheets of newspaper for that.

While I agree that plastics should be limited where food is concerned, I don't think it serves a purpose to refuse it as a food storage option. Not in this day and age of petroleum contamination. The plastic surrounding our food is the least of our worries, particularly in a SHTF situation. Wherever possible, we use glass - but it is heavy and breaks easily.


I say get it stored first, then go back later and make changes!
You should take a bottle of water to a university or area college and have them test it. See what exactely is in the water. One question though, Did you fill the bottles with tap water or maybe stream water. If it was tap water, you should take a sample of that with you to have them test it to see what chemicals already exist in the water. It would be interesting to see the results.
 
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