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Discussion Starter #1
Fairly new gun, haven't had any problems with it, prob only 200-250 rounds through it. Have the SR40 as well, but am slowly moving to a 9mm platform. I now CC the SR9c, instead of a Shield in .40

I don't really care about the cosmetics as much, however, i do like the look of the steel rod better, that aside, they offer a 16lb (factory) steel rod, as well as a 14lb and 18lb rod. Would the 18lb rod offer even less recoil then the already seeming low factory 16lb rod installed? I figure may as well have every advantage possible, esp. for follow up shots.

Nothing is wrong with the Guide Rod that it came with from the factory, and i have no problem with if it isn't broke then don't fix it, but if someone has experience with these guide rods, especially the 18lb, i'd like to know if it lessens the recoil even more?

 

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I looked at the Galloway steel rods for my wife's SR9. I couldn't find a single occurrence at the time of anecdotal evidence of anyone's breaking even with higher round counts, so I decided against it. She has well over 1000 rds through hers and no appreciable wear on the guide rod and spring. Please let us know if you do get one and how it works. It's still something I think about as far as not being able to find parts if everything goes tits up and the plastic one breaks.
 

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I looked at the Galloway steel rods for my wife's SR9. I couldn't find a single occurrence at the time of anecdotal evidence of anyone's breaking even with higher round counts, so I decided against it. She has well over 1000 rds through hers and no appreciable wear on the guide rod and spring. Please let us know if you do get one and how it works. It's still something I think about as far as not being able to find parts if everything goes tits up and the plastic one breaks.
Will do, i'm thinking of buying and replacing, then keeping the factory rod as a "replacement"/backup.
Just needing to decide if i should stick with the 16lb or try the 18lb.
i'll do a little more research, and prob pull the trigger on one or the other in a week or two
 

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I got the Galloway guide rod and recoil springs for one of my Ruger LC9's. I have another LC9 that is stock. I take both to the range and shoot 150 rounds in each pistol...

What I have observed:
Galloway LC9 - cycles faster, less muzzle rise, better target acquirement, slightly smoother trigger pull

Regular LC9 -kicks like a mule, tremendous muzzle rise, increased time for target acquirement, typical long trigger pull.

I would say, based on the above statements, any Galloway addition/substitution to a Ruger pistol makes for a better pistol.
 

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The issue of how much impact the recoil spring has is debated from the research I've done. I always assumed that a heavier recoil spring = less felt recoil. However, I picked some brains at work, and it seems like the main and almost sole purpose of the recoil spring is just for timing. How heavy the spring is set correlates with the mass of the slide. A light slide moves back faster so it needs a heavier spring to slow it down so that it doesn't open up too fast. You don't want the extractor to skip right over the rim of the case because it comes back too fast, and you don't want the slide moving faster than the magazine can feed. Also, the issue of short stroking with too much spring pressure comes into play.

A lighter recoil spring will send the slide slamming back faster, but while the impact would be rougher, this makes the entire recoil stroke shorter. Again, you could be going too fast for the extractor and magazine.

Due to physics, the only way to truly have less recoil is to shoot a lighter bullet or a lower powder charge. With the same ammunition, you have the same amount of recoil force no matter how heavy the slide and spring is on your firearm, the gun just handles it differently.

I hope that makes some sense, I'm still trying to get to the bottom of it myself, but my research has indicated that the recoil spring is mainly just for proper timing of the action and not recoil mitigation. That's why guns with big ol' slides typically have lighter recoil springs because of the static resistance of the extra weight, it goes back slower.

I would stick with the stock 16lb recoil spring. On a defensive firearm, don't take chances. On a range only gun it would be cool to try different spring rates and see if you can notice a difference. 14lb, 16lb, and 18lb are probably all close enough that your SR9c would run just fine, but I'd stick with the 16lb.

All that being said, Longranger's comments about the galloway LC9 handling recoil better has me intrigued. I did all this research myself because I too have an SR9c and was considering a stronger recoil spring; also wanted one for my M&P but I'm not convinced yet that I will see any benefit from different spring rates.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Common sense tells me the higher the spring lb. rating, the less recoil.
just for ease of understanding, let's say you have a 5# guide spring, and a 25# guide spring, the 25# is obviously going to have the least recoil.
you fire a shot, it pushes the slide/guide rod and spring back.
the higher the lb rating on the guide rod spring, the less recoil felt.
However, it will just take a little more "oomph" to rack the slide.

obviously you'd want to stay within the parameters to have your firearm function properly.
 

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Common sense tells me the higher the spring lb. rating, the less recoil.
just for ease of understanding, let's say you have a 5# guide spring, and a 25# guide spring, the 25# is obviously going to have the least recoil.
you fire a shot, it pushes the slide/guide rod and spring back.
the higher the lb rating on the guide rod spring, the less recoil felt.
However, it will just take a little more "oomph" to rack the slide.

obviously you'd want to stay within the parameters to have your firearm function properly.
Also though, a much longer recoil stroke. Your theory seems to make sense to me too, but google it some and you will see a lot of replies saying that lightening the recoil spring actually lessens felt recoil, but batters the frame. The recoil cycle is much quicker, and, due to physics, you are still getting the same amount of recoil from the load you are shooting, its just quicker.

You have to remember that the energy doesn't just disappear. The spring itself is pushing back against the frame trying to drag the frame with the slide, thus pushing against your hand. A lighter spring offers more free travel of the slide and you aren't fighting the spring to hold the frame in place against the slides movement. This is where the issue of short stroking comes into play with certain guns when the frame is allowed to recoil too far back with the slide, but that's a whole different issue.

Bore axis and weight of the firearm contribute more to "felt recoil" than does spring rate. A heavy firearm will have more static resistance and a lower bore axis will align the impulse with your arm better than getting leverage over it.

Luckily, the SR9c has an extremely low bore axis, and for it's size, isn't a lightweight. Not heavy, but not a featherweight either.
 

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There are 2 things to consider....
1. recoil is caused by the bullet being fired.
2. muzzle rise, or muzzle flip is caused by the action of the slide.

A heavier recoil spring "absorbs" more of the recoil energy. Spits the spent case out the port just a fraction of a second slower than a lighter recoil spring would, but due to the "absorbed" energy, pushes the slide forward faster. Which means faster load. Which means less muzzle flip. Which means better target acquisition.

There are limits as to what is too light and too heavy for recoil springs... FTF's (ftfire or ftfeed) are the result.


metal vs polymer guide rods - debate is continuous. For the LC9's the polymer guide rod flex more so than the metal guide rods; the more flex the more the potential for muzzle rise.

As for felt/perceived recoil - that is more a matter of hand and wrist strength/size in relation to pistol size than caliber of round, grain weight, etc.

Smoother trigger pull - just something I've noticed about two similar firearms; don't have an explanation.
 

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I replaced my guide rod with a Galloway stainless and can't tell any difference.

I did send my LC9 to Galloway for the magazine disconnect mod and the shortened trigger pull mod and that made a world of difference.

Now that Ruger has come out with the LC9s, I' really like to trade for the newer model.

-bob
 

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The LC9s has an excellent trigger pull. As much as I love my shield, i have to say the trigger pull, out of the box, is better on the LC9s.
 
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