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Cautious Optimist
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was just diagnosed with Celiac Disease back in November 2010, thus rendering my supply of wheat completely useless.

But I continue to make strides in my preps. The only thing that I find difficult to stomach is stocking my gluten-free bread mix. It costs almost $6 for one loaf, plus requires egg whites from 7 eggs to prepare! So, we're talking about a $7 loaf of bread. Hard to believe, I know, but such is life for those of us with gluten enteropathy.

Anybody else out there in the same boat? How are your preps different? Are you stocking up on popcorn??

Would love some helpful prepping pointers form fellow Celiacs.
 

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Yeah, I'm a celiac prepper. I was diagnosed in Feb. of 2010 officially. I am prepping for 100% total GF household, now.

Go here.

http://betterbatter.org/

That is the 100% BEST Gluten free flour blend ever made. The CEO's name is Naomi and she deals in food storage quantities. You can get 25lb. bags for $65, and she gives discounts for bulk orders, I think.

It is BY FAR, more economical than buying $6 loaves of nasty bread that weigh about 50 lbs, are about the size of a small brick and are made of what seems to be solid metal.

I did not give up eggs but I did give up dairy.

At the bottom of her site she gives a telephone #, call her directly.

I stock a lot of rice and canned veggies, name brand only.
 

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Cautious Optimist
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah, I'm a celiac prepper. I was diagnosed in Feb. of 2010 officially. I am prepping for 100% total GF household, now.

Go here.

http://betterbatter.org/

That is the 100% BEST Gluten free flour blend ever made. The CEO's name is Naomi and she deals in food storage quantities. You can get 25lb. bags for $65, and she gives discounts for bulk orders, I think.

It is BY FAR, more economical than buying $6 loaves of nasty bread that weigh about 50 lbs, are about the size of a small brick and are made of what seems to be solid metal.

I did not give up eggs but I did give up dairy.

At the bottom of her site she gives a telephone #, call her directly.

I stock a lot of rice and canned veggies, name brand only.
Awesome. Thanks for the link. Would love your recipe for baking homemade bread!
 

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I was diagnosed as a Celiac back in 2002. It was before anyone had heard the terms "Gluten Intolerant" or "Celiac". I was sick for months/years before one allergy specialist diagnosed me in about five minutes and I got my life back. So.... I know your pain and am thankful you found out, hopefully very quickly as I wouldn't wish what I went through on my worst enemy.
For prepping we stock foods that all of us can eat, trying to focus on inexpensive gluten-free bulk foods like rice and beans, canned goods, etc. For our long-term storage food we have a split between gluten-filled stuff for my family (these for example: http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?prodid=11622359&whse=BC&topnav=&cm_sp=RichRelevance-_-categorypageHorizontalTop-_-PopularProductsInCategory and gluten-free survival foods from Auguson Farms: http://www.augasonfarms.com/Products/Gluten-Free . We also make a lot of our own breads, cookies, etc. with flours from Bob's Red Mill: http://www.bobsredmill.com/gluten-free/ .
My best wishes for you and don't give up! :)
Chip
Host of the "Chip Monk Family Survival Podcast"
 

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Prep and be calm
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Going gluten free takes rethinking your habits and learning some new ones. Yes you can make a gluten free loaf of bread but, as you point out, the usual recipe is not friendly to storage and expensive.

There are many cultures that eat their grains in a flat bread. In S. America corn tortillas (gluten free), In South India there "Idly," a rice/lentil patty which is quite delicious. Also left over gluten free pancakes make a fine "bread" for sandwiches.

Then there is polenta from eastern Europe or in the US-South corn grits, corn meal mush, etc. And oatmeal is a standby for hour household. We eat a lot of it.

I make gluten free pancakes -- making the gluten free mix myself from my own flours plus xanthan gum (http://glutenfreecooking.about.com/od/glutenfreecookingbasics/a/xanthanguargums.htm)

And if you wish to learn more about the delicious "sour dough" Idly there are online resources. Idly batter is very much like sourdough starter/batter -- but its base is rice and lentil flour. Ordinarily traditional Idly is steamed but I prefer to pour the batter out on a skillet and cook like a pancake or flat bread. The Indian food "dosa" is Idly batter with more liquid to make it thin and poured out on a skillet like a crisp crepe.

There are many many choices beyond bread. Stocking gluten-free grains and a flour mill is a must along with learning new ways of cooking. I stock rice, corn, oats and xantan gum. I also stock Idly flour (can be found at Indian food markets). And in general our diet is less oriented to carbohydrates found in grains and more toward fruits, vegetables and proteins.
 

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Chat Addict
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Hi there!

I am running a GF household also, as my 7yr old is Celiac, and the rest of us do better off gluten also.

I have stocked up on rice/rice flour (frozen) and we pretty much just don't eat bread anymore as I refuse to pay those kinda prices for it.

Glad to see a couple others here that are facing this challenge also!

~R
 

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Prep and be calm
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Gluten Free pancake/baking mix:

A mix of any of the following flours: Buckwheat, Rice, Corn, Garbonzo, Teff, Potato, Amaranth (expensive), Oats, Quinoa (expensive)

I generally use two or three of these flours together with a base in buckwheat, rice, and/or corn.

For each cup of flour add 1 tsp of baking soda and 1/2 tsp of xanthan gum or guar gum.

Use as you would in any pancake or muffin mix. Add milk (or water if you avoid dairy) and eggs to create a thick batter for muffins, more water for a slightly more liquid batter for pancakes, or a very thin batter for crepes.
 

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Awesome. Thanks for the link. Would love your recipe for baking homemade bread!

I use the bread recipes off the Better Batter site. She's got recipes there that I've copied and filed away with my own. Hers are the best I've ever used! I should add that Naomi's flour blend comes with the xanthan gum already in it! No need to worry about long overly complicated recipes, or long overly complicated steps. Just use it like you would use any old all purpose flour.
 

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Prep and be calm
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The more you make from scratch the safer you will be in avoiding gluten and the cheaper it will be. Yes, there are mixes and packages out there you can find that are gluten-free but you pay quite a premium.

The basic peasant food of many cultures -- food made in the traditional way -- has sustained many generations without packages. It is generally "poor folks" food and there is no reason gluten-free has to be expensive. But, yes it is somewhat more time consuming until you learn a new routine. After you learn how, it becomes so automatic you wonder why you would ever want to bother with packaged foods.
 

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Cautious Optimist
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Going gluten free takes rethinking your habits and learning some new ones. Yes you can make a gluten free loaf of bread but, as you point out, the usual recipe is not friendly to storage and expensive.

There are many cultures that eat their grains in a flat bread. In S. America corn tortillas (gluten free), In South India there "Idly," a rice/lentil patty which is quite delicious. Also left over gluten free pancakes make a fine "bread" for sandwiches.

Then there is polenta from eastern Europe or in the US-South corn grits, corn meal mush, etc. And oatmeal is a standby for hour household. We eat a lot of it.

I make gluten free pancakes -- making the gluten free mix myself from my own flours plus xanthan gum (http://glutenfreecooking.about.com/od/glutenfreecookingbasics/a/xanthanguargums.htm)

And if you wish to learn more about the delicious "sour dough" Idly there are online resources. Idly batter is very much like sourdough starter/batter -- but its base is rice and lentil flour. Ordinarily traditional Idly is steamed but I prefer to pour the batter out on a skillet and cook like a pancake or flat bread. The Indian food "dosa" is Idly batter with more liquid to make it thin and poured out on a skillet like a crisp crepe.

There are many many choices beyond bread. Stocking gluten-free grains and a flour mill is a must along with learning new ways of cooking. I stock rice, corn, oats and xantan gum. I also stock Idly flour (can be found at Indian food markets). And in general our diet is less oriented to carbohydrates found in grains and more toward fruits, vegetables and proteins.
My world is filled with grits, cornbread and such. My particular favorite is the old-school cornbread "pancakes" that my wife cooks up in that awesome old iron skillet.

But I still love to spring for one of those expensive bread mixes, on occasion.

I need something to spread my superb homemade blackberry jam on! :D:
 

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My son is allergic to wheat.... but I have found that he can tolerate organic whole wheat. I purchase it from our local Mennonite bulk food store in 50 lb. bags for $26.

You can grow your own buckwheat very easily, or so I have read. I am going to try it.

http://http://www.motherearthnews.com/Organic-Gardening/1986-05-01/Buckwheat.aspx

I get rice in 50 pound bags from Sam's Club for $18. The popcorn there is priced about the same. If you have a grinder, you can grind buckwheat, rice and corn yourself and get gluten-free flour for about $.36 per pound (plus some elbow grease.)
 

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Cautious Optimist
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
My son is allergic to wheat.... but I have found that he can tolerate organic whole wheat. I purchase it from our local Mennonite bulk food store in 50 lb. bags for $26.

You can grow your own buckwheat very easily, or so I have read. I am going to try it.

http://http://www.motherearthnews.com/Organic-Gardening/1986-05-01/Buckwheat.aspx

I get rice in 50 pound bags from Sam's Club for $18. The popcorn there is priced about the same. If you have a grinder, you can grind buckwheat, rice and corn yourself and get gluten-free flour for about $.36 per pound (plus some elbow grease.)
True celiac disease is not an allergy. It is an autoimmune disorder. The body produces antibody against the enzyme that breaks down gluten. Therefore, when it is consumed, the gluten enzymes accumulate in the villi of the small intestine and the anti-TTG antibodies actually attack the villi ... attacking the intestinal lining. The result is extensive damage to the intestinal wall, pain, gas, bloating, diarrhea, etc...

I've never tried buckwheat. Might have to give it a try!
 

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Im kinda faced with this dilema as well. Im not celiac but my diet might as well be. Im on a journey to loose alot of weight. So far ive lost 80lbs, got another 130+ to go. My diet is low carb. I only eat at most 35 carbs aday. Which for me means no grains products of any kind and no breads, no rice nothing that has any amount of carbs in it. Now its just me eating this way, so i stock normal stuff, like legumes and grains for the rest of the family, but i put back alot more veggies so i can prep for my self and still maintain my diet when the shtf.
 

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I need something to spread my superb homemade blackberry jam on! :D:
Oh man, try taking some Cream of Wheat/Farina and when done, pour it in a silicone loaf pan and put it in the fridge (let it cool). Then dump the "loaf", cut off some slices and fry them up till they get GB&D (golden brown & delicious). serve them up and put some of your Blackberry jam on that!

edit: wait...brain just kicked in, so maybe not Cream of Wheat but I bet this particular recipe would work just fine for breakfast corn cakes made from Polenta (as long as there is no Italian Spices).
 

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True celiac disease is not an allergy. It is an autoimmune disorder. The body produces antibody against the enzyme that breaks down gluten. Therefore, when it is consumed, the gluten enzymes accumulate in the villi of the small intestine and the anti-TTG antibodies actually attack the villi ... attacking the intestinal lining. The result is extensive damage to the intestinal wall, pain, gas, bloating, diarrhea, etc...

I've never tried buckwheat. Might have to give it a try!
Yes, I'm sorry.... I should have explained better. I was very thankful my son didn't have celiac's. We thought he did at first, but he has an allergy. We did grind rice flour at first, though. It was about 1/3 the price of the pre-ground flour we purchased.
 

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Cautious Optimist
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Yes, I'm sorry.... I should have explained better. I was very thankful my son didn't have celiac's. We thought he did at first, but he has an allergy. We did grind rice flour at first, though. It was about 1/3 the price of the pre-ground flour we purchased.
He is blessed, indeed. :) It took a long, hard medical journey to finally get my diagnosis.

But I think most folk would be better off without the gluten.
 

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My brother and I are gluten free and maybe my son he is getting tested. The rest of the house is fine. Although I have read wheat belly. We already had large amounts of rice now I will be stocking mostly for myself and one extra person. I am slowly doing rice pasta cause of its expense. I need to do prego or homemade sauce. Thanks for the link for the bulk better batter I will be looking into that. Buying gluten free in bulk has nothing to do with prepping its just smart cause of the expense.
 

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Peas and Carrots!
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I'm gluten intolerent and have given up on "white" type breads. For pasta I have found there is a quinoa pasta that is good, but do NOT overcook it, it will mush up. It's a bit pricier than regular pasta but I'm the only one who eats it. I cook pasta in a pot for the rest and in a saucepan for me, the sauces go on top.

I've found that cornbread can be made into many different forms and flavors from sweet to spicy. If a meal just needs a bread, I make one type of cornbread or another. You can make a killer garlic bread with a cornbread base. So our preps have lots of dried corn. Grits are another handy thing, but I realize they may be culturally based. Many people outside the south were not fortunate enough to be blessed with the grit gene. :) But you can eat them hot with salt, pepper, and butter or cheese. When they are cold you can slice them and fry them.

Rice is really handy also. You can switch up most pasta recipes to work with a rice base.
 
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