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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, All.

I'm having an issue trying to figure out an appropriate amount of legumes to add to our LTS. I'd like your thoughts.

Right now, we have about 200# for 5 people. I want to add more in the next month or two but I'm not sure what's 'appropriate' for a year. (I'll keep adding, but I'm trying to keep our stores balanced.)

The LDS recommendation is 5# per person per month. That doesn't seem nearly enough! Even the old recommendation of 90#/person/year doesn't seem like a lot. I have a spreadsheet that calculates what we have and the recommended servings. Ninety pounds is just a little over 2 servings a day. I tried looking up the FDA suggestion. It's not the greatest source, but I thought I could at least figure out the ratio to other foods. The info I found suggested we should only eat legumes 3 to 5 times a week because it was hard to digest. Huh? We've never had a problem unless I don't soak beans for at least a day.

I realize we should store what we eat, but, to be honest, I'm in school so I don't cook as much or as well as I should so I'm trying to plan for a more balanced diet. Anyway, how did you figure out how much to store? Do you store some ratio of grains to legumes?
 

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how many beans, lentils, peas, etc do you and your family consume in a week's time?
we are heavy bean eaters here, and have bean based meals 3 to 4 times a week depending on the time of year. If you keep track of how often you serve legumes right now, you will have a better idea of how many to store. remember you don't want to have to change your diets completely when you have to rely on your stores, you want to continue to eat as normal. So take census of how often you use your legumes this month, then multiply that by 12 to figure out how many you will use in a year. Remember to rotate stock and store what you eat now.
 

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I haven't worked out exact ratios yet, as I'm still working up a small amount of storage to begin with. Then if we eat two or three times as much of something, I will store it in similar amounts. What I can tell you so far, is that we're eating healthier, and it seems like I need to buy ALOT more instant potatoes than I thought. (I don't like them much, but the rest do.)

Does anyone else have a sack of mung beans for sprouting? I'm worried about the possible health issues of insufficient greens and sprouts.
 

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If I remember right, I think the Mormons and the food storage companies figured about 70 lbs per person, per year, to balance out about 270 lbs of grains. I tend to round up, for the added calories to support the harder work. I rough guess at 300 lbs of grains and 100 lbs of legumes.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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Does anyone else have a sack of mung beans for sprouting? I'm worried about the possible health issues of insufficient greens and sprouts.
I keep a lot of mung beans, as well as other sprouting seeds on hand. We'll need the live enzymes. In fact, you can actually sprout regular beans before you cook them too, and it increases several vitamins immensely, especially C. There was a good article on that over at www.waltonfeed.com a while back. They've changed their site around a bit, but I bet it's still there somewhere. You can also sprout wheat. Sprouted wheat makes an outstanding breakfast cereal!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Methemom, our diet has to change if something were to happen. I'll have free time to cook and Pizza Hut won't deliver. :) We do rotate our stores into our normal diets, just not in the same frequency as if something were to happen.

Anyway, the FDA recommendations of eating legumes 3 times a week worked out to only 40# per person for a year. I don't think twice that is enough. When I make homemade chili, we can go through 2+# and that lasts just a couple of days. I just don't have time to cook like that; there's always a paper due.

I'm leaning towards at least 100# each of beans plus some of the greener ones like lentils, peas, and lima beans. I'm just trying to make sure I'm in the right ball park.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Does anyone else have a sack of mung beans for sprouting? I'm worried about the possible health issues of insufficient greens and sprouts.
I'm worried about insufficient greens too. We need to store more veggies, but it's harder to find them in bulk at a decent price. Half our legumes are green (peas, lima beans,...) and have some beans set aside for sprouting. We bought them from the Sprout People before we got serious about prepping. There's a lot of good info on the site, and I'm sure you already have more food stores to sprout besides just mung. :)
 

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I'm worried about insufficient greens too. We need to store more veggies, but it's harder to find them in bulk at a decent price. Half our legumes are green (peas, lima beans,...) and have some beans set aside for sprouting. We bought them from the Sprout People before we got serious about prepping. There's a lot of good info on the site, and I'm sure you already have more food stores to sprout besides just mung. :)
I like alfalfa sprouts, but others like radish or buckwheat sprouts, for instance, are a change in taste.
 

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Standing Vigilant
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Beans & More

I had a calculator that gave me a rough estimate.
But, knowing my family, it was no where close to being enough.

For my 4 family members I have stocked in 5 or 6 gal. buckets:
600 lbs. beans & 750 lbs of rice.
Plus I have several buckets of navy beans, lentils etc...
This might get us through a year or a bit more....hopefully.

As was said earlier, we use ALOT of beans just in making chili.
The four of us can go through several pounds of beans a day.
 

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Methemom, our diet has to change if something were to happen. I'll have free time to cook and Pizza Hut won't deliver. :) We do rotate our stores into our normal diets, just not in the same frequency as if something were to happen.

Anyway, the FDA recommendations of eating legumes 3 times a week worked out to only 40# per person for a year. I don't think twice that is enough. When I make homemade chili, we can go through 2+# and that lasts just a couple of days. I just don't have time to cook like that; there's always a paper due.

I'm leaning towards at least 100# each of beans plus some of the greener ones like lentils, peas, and lima beans. I'm just trying to make sure I'm in the right ball park.
I hear you there. Beans and crock cookers were made for each other. For me it is pintos. Soak pintos overnight. Pour off excess water. Dump beans into crock pot w some kind of ham scraps. A little molasses, a little mustard, and even a little ketchup, along with a shot of hot sauce. Nothing overwhelming with the spices, you just want to improve the bland flavor of the beans. Cover with water and fold over everything to mix in the condiments. Run the crock pot on low overnight and your beans should be ready in the morning. For your situation you may need to adjust this, try it several different ways until you hit upon the way that works.

During hard times you may not have the luxury of working electricity and crockpots. But you will have learned about beans. You will still soak them. But then you can cook more rapidly over higher heat. Naturally you would have to watch them and maybe even stir. I would imagine that a pressure cooking approach would be great during hard times. Cooks quicker, using less energy.

Mmmmm, beans. They're really addictive. One bonus I have discovered about beans is that, if I cook and eat beans 3 or 4 times a week, the gas problem is no longer there. I can eat beans just like any other normal food.
 

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I'm kind of in the same boat w/r/t figuring out how much to store in beans. But part of what I'm doing is also storing canned beans and fruit, and that figures into what I'm doing.

I'm also planning for four people; along w/ everything else I have, it seems that a pound of beans a day is minimum. That makes a total of 365 pounds. I'm sure we wouldn't eat them daily, which means at 3-4 times per week, that's two pounds for four people when we do...

Somehow, that formula--a quarter-pound of beans a day per person--seems right for us. That's pretty close to the old 90# per person per year recommendation. And when I say "beans" I mean navy, pinto, red, kidney, even lentils, so there'd be a variety.
 

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During hard times you may not have the luxury of working electricity and crockpots. But you will have learned about beans. You will still soak them. But then you can cook more rapidly over higher heat. Naturally you would have to watch them and maybe even stir. I would imagine that a pressure cooking approach would be great during hard times. Cooks quicker, using less energy.
Consider a simple solar oven for this. With an inexpensive fresnel lense, a black painted cardboard or wooden box and a dark crock pot ceramic insert with a glass cover will work just like a slow cooker. Practice now, and you'll always have a quiet, smoke free way to cook. Doubly so if you happen to live in the South, when and where sunlight is plentiful year round.
 

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Well this is gona sound like overkill but here it goes. Lentils are great,they use little fuel to cook,sprout well and store very well. We have tons and I do mean tons or beans put away for our family but lentils are one that we store about 150# each per year. And the main reason is what I already stated. We store alot of stuff for sprouting so we can have greens durring the winter and early spring and not just what grows in the greenhouse. I can sprout lentils,mungbeans,wheat,radish and garbonzo beans and have fresh greens in 2 to 3 days. Thats a huge advantage over just having dry beans for every meal. Also with garbonzo beans we perfer to make humus with sprouted beans as oposed to just the beans. For us we prefer the taste. But lentils are so good for so many things and you can ever use alot of the green lentils for growing your next years crop.I find though the red lentils becasue they are cut dont sprout. So check to see if your lentils will grow then you have your seeds to.

I have also taken lentils that have been stored for over 10 years in 5 galllon buckets with mylar and o2s and had them grow then harvested them and replanted them again this year and they are doing great. Better then a 85% germination so good luck.
 

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I have stored about 250 lbs of various dry beans for two of us. They grow really well in the garden, so unlike rice I am only storing a years worth plus some as seed.

A solar over sounds good for folks in the southwest. Folks in the north might want to dig a bean hole and simmer them in cast iron over coals.
 

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Here's still another suggestion for amounts to store:
http://survivalacres.com/information/suggested_storage.html

It seems to me that you should balance all the stores with each other, since each food complements each other to one degree or another, especially in amino acids. If you have some of the amino acids but lack just one, you are not getting a balanced protein, so it doesn't do any good to have just some. Adding meats or dairy works, but also beans supplement rice, wheat, and corn. Mexicans and Native Americans combine them in most of their meals, so they could be a good model for us.

I store several varieties of beans but focus on the smaller beans for less cooking, including lentils and split peas, some smaller navy beans. Each of the beans have their own nutritional value and taste, so more variety could be adviseable. They can all be sprouted too, if they are whole (not split peas).

I've heard that pouring out the soaking water and adding fresh water before cooking removes most of the gas causing problems with beans.
 
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