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Hello,

I am new to being a survivalist but not new to owning guns. I've grown up around them and am very familiar with their usage. However my family never did store large quantities of ammo until recently. I own a 12 gauge Mossberg Maverick 88 and have now stockpiled over 500 rounds in military surplus ammo cans. Now when I bought the cans I checked to make sure they were in good condition and checked the rubber gasket that seals the lid. Even ran a water hose over each can prior to filling them to test the seal. Never have had a problem and my ammo still looks as new as the day I bought them. However I only started this about 8 months ago.

My questions are; how long will ammo store like that? Is there anything else I can do to improve my ammo storage? Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!
dustman1089
 

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Farm Security for Hire
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I'm not exactly an expert either, but I have some theories. My problem is that I take the easy way out with my AK ammo by buying it in the factory sealed 640 rnd tins, and I tend to burn through my pistol ammo faster than I can buy it (I'm slowly making headway, though.)

Here are some things I plan on doing when I start storing ammo long term. Other than keeping it in ammo cans, that is.

- I'll probably separate the ammo into 50 or 100 rnd plastic baggies for convenience, but this will add another layer of protection.

- Silica packets. Or a comparable product. Something that'll absorb moisture/oxygen. I'm still in the research phase on this front.

- Rotating. Obviously I'm going to train with my weapons. So I just have to set it up that as I buy ammo, I take the oldest stuff to train with and put the new stuff on the shelf. Which is kind of what I'm doing now, but in excellerated fashion. I need to ease up on the practicing for a while and focus more on the stocking part.
 

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Stargazer Extraordinaire
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Sealed tins or battle packs are by far the best for long term storage. Buy that for storage if you can find it in your caliber, never seen shotgun ammo in sealed containers. In the case of boxed or loose ammo packing in vacuum sealer bags and then packing in your ammo cans is about the best you can do.

Store it in the coolest place you can find, dessicant in the packs and cans is a good idea if you have any.

If you feel the need to bury the ammo place it well sealed in 3 or 4 inch PVC pipe with caps glued on both ends. This should keep it ready for years.

Other than moisture, heat is ammos worst enemy. Keep it cool and dry.

Rick
 

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Opinionated old Vet.
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Just put it in an ammo can close the lid and put it in a cool dry place. I have shot WW2 ammo that had been just laying around and it all worked. The old paper shot shells you had to keep cool & dry. I have some ammo over 40 years old that I reloaded. They all work as they should.
 

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My problem is the "cool dry place" part. Right now my option is to bury ammo, and I'm trying to find a system I can trust to keep my things safe and dry.
 

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I have mine in old ammo cans with silica packets and storing it in the basement. It's only been ~4 years but I haven't noticed any changes/problems.
 

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The only problem I've seen with really old ammo is some tarnish and sulfating/corrosion of the brass cases. For long-term storage, we put our boxes in mylar bags and seal them with a dessicant pack and an oxygen absorber. No moisture + no oxygen = no chemical reactions. This should work the same for shotgun shells. :thumb:
 

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I have been keeping all of the little silica packets, that come in everything, for a long time now and find them useful for this application.
If the packets haven't been saved in a dry container, you can re-furbish (dry them) in your oven by putting them on a cookie sheet and leaving them in the oven for a couple of hours at a low temperature - around 170. Then store them in a closed container.
 

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One tip - never handle the brass and never open the boxes of ammo that you plan on storing for a long period of time. The oils on your fingers will make the brass corrode. Once a box is opened and the brass is handled, put it in your "to shoot" pile.

I prefer plastic ammo cans over the metal ones.

I try to stay with maybe 2 or 3 brands of ammo. My family is running into a situation where we are stockpiling 4 or 5 different calibers, and 3 or 4 different brands and weights of ammo.

An article was posted on my blog about it - http://www.survivalboards.com/2010-12-23/stockpiling-too-many-types-of-survival-ammunition/

Lets take 30-30 for example, we have remington, winchester and federal, and 150 and 170 grain bullets. Granted the 30-30 is only going to be used for 100 yard shots or less, you do not want to start mixing and matching different brands and weights of ammo.

When I look at the 30-06 stockpile for my dad and brother, its a nightmare. They must have 3 or 4 brands of ammo, and probably 3 different weights of bullets.

For my 308, I am stockpiling remington 150 grain core-lokt, and that is it. I am thinking of buying a case of 308 just to have some round nose for target shooting, but I do not want to mix and match my 308. When I get a couple hundred rounds of 308 hunting ammo stockpiled, then I might buy some target ammo.

22 long rifle, that is another nightmare. We probably have half a dozen different brand names of bricks.

I am trying to make sure my family has plenty of ammo stockpiled, but it takes a lot of time to keep up with the calibers, brand names of ammo, and weights of the bullets.

30-06
308
30-30
280/7mm express
270
7.62x39
223
22 magnum
22 long rifle

Then making sure all of those rifles have what they need.

So not only do you need to look at "how" your ammo is stored, but you need to keep track of the brand names and weights of the bullets that your storing. If you have 300 rounds of 30-06 in 150 grain, do not go out and buy 200 rounds of 170 grain. Pick a weight and brand name of ammo that you know "for a fact" works well in your rifle, and stick with it.
 

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I have in my possession a few boxes of shells I inherited from my grandfather. I have possessed them since the mid 1970s and he had them for at least a decade before that.

Last year I grabbed a handfull of these shells, by accident, for a hunting trip.

The old paper hulled, cardboard top wad shells performed flawlessly.

They have been stored for 50 years in a three pound coffee can sitting in the bottom of the closet.

You guys worry too much! Just keep them dry.
 

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Farm Security for Hire
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I have in my possession a few boxes of shells I inherited from my grandfather. I have possessed them since the mid 1970s and he had them for at least a decade before that.

Last year I grabbed a handfull of these shells, by accident, for a hunting trip.

The old paper hulled, cardboard top wad shells performed flawlessly.

They have been stored for 50 years in a three pound coffee can sitting in the bottom of the closet.

You guys worry too much! Just keep them dry.
I don't worry so much about the ammo in my house so much as I worry about ammo I might need to store outside, or in the ground, or somewhere else that would expose the ammunition to environmental hazards. Even a basement can be a tricky place to store ammo if you don't check it very often. Taking some extra steps to ensure that my ammo stays good to go seems like one of those small things that could make a big difference.


Although with the price of ammo cans lately, I might explore other storage options.
 

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5 decades before in the villages they didn't have electricity and they was storing food in waxed fabric to keep the moisture out ...if that helps
 

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I shot a box of winchester superX birdshot 12GA that was about 20 years old and had been stored outside and submerged in water multiple times. Went bang every time.

That being said... No moisture, no oxygen, no chemical reactions; hence no decay... Keep that in mind for LONG term storage.
 

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Zomby Woof
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Hello,

I am new to being a survivalist but not new to owning guns. I've grown up around them and am very familiar with their usage. However my family never did store large quantities of ammo until recently. I own a 12 gauge Mossberg Maverick 88 and have now stockpiled over 500 rounds in military surplus ammo cans. Now when I bought the cans I checked to make sure they were in good condition and checked the rubber gasket that seals the lid. Even ran a water hose over each can prior to filling them to test the seal. Never have had a problem and my ammo still looks as new as the day I bought them. However I only started this about 8 months ago.

My questions are; how long will ammo store like that? Is there anything else I can do to improve my ammo storage? Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!
dustman1089
Fort Skully, my so called "BOL" has a 30Cal metal ammo can containing 12 and 20g plastic shells, mostly Remington 2-3/4 #4 shot.

Ft. Skully is a really tricked out 12X16 storage building, but still a storage building.

IMG00134.jpg

No environmental controls unless we are there. Then it's only a wood stove or 12v fans. The shells are for opening day of Squirrel season each year, and have been there for nine years. I have only used between 3 and 8 shells per year, and they have performed perfectly.
 

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Joshua 24:14-15
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I've been using small pieces of drywall in my ammo cans to absorb moisture.
Rmfcasey
I've never heard this one. Have you found a way to verify the results?


Do you store ammo in a humid area?


I live in a very dry area but do store some ammo in a couple of places that are humid.

Thanks
 
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