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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of the things I truly enjoy is taking new shooters to the range. Tomorrow I am taking two friends to the range, I have taken them both once before at different times. They are both looking to get their first gun. I have several they can try out and shoot to help them find what works for best for them.

Normally when I take new shooters to the range I tell them not to worry about the ammo. They normally treat me to a nice dinner after shooting in return. Last night I went on line to look at what it would cost to replace the ammo. I don’t live under a rock and was aware that prices had gone up, but when I figured out how much it will cost to cover their shooting tomorrow, I was a bit shocked.

I did stack ammo deep while it was cheap. I have plenty and am not hurting, but I want to replace what I shoot to keep my supplies where I am comfortable.

Between 9mm, .45 .380, 10mm, .22 and .556 I realized that between the two of them they could easily shoot $500 plus worth of ammo tomorrow which I will want to replace. Add what I will be shooting and that jumps to $600 plus. (I shoot a lot less with new shooters because I tend to focus on them and that they are learning/doing things correctly). That is too expensive for my blood. Heck that is significantly more than the payments for my last vehicle.

I sent them a text explaining the situation and that they would need to cover the cost of the ammo they are shooting.

Any predictions on when/if prices will go back to within 20 percent of 2019 prices? Any possibility of it happening during the Biden years? Hopefully manufacturers catch of with the demand of all the new gun owners soon.
 

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I will tell you friom my not uninformed perspective that we are looking at several years backlog in the shooting industry. That is regardless of legislation. New firearm sales have driven demand and despite the shooting sports industry gearing up production, they are struggling with supply chain issues like everyone else.
Following the laws of supply and demand, we can expect demand to remain high and supply to possibly increase assuming raw materials can be resourced from other areas/industries.
There is a strong push for automation, believe it or not the production of ammunition is a very labor intensive activity.
Short answer, dry fire practice, laser simulations and airguns may need to take up some of your shooting time unless your wallet is much thicker than mine.
 
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Maybe my stash is deeper than other's, but i don't get the obsession with replacing every round fired. Having an ammo fort is so you can draw it down a bit in times like this.

The supply side of this mess makes it hard to guess when things will loosen up. You can see the coming republican landslide in the midterms already. In past cycles that has meant that demand tends to calm down and the market eases up. Will it repeat this time? Hard to say. The general level of mess in the supply chain, the potential for widespread violence from the left, and the real likelihood that we are in an inflationary cycle may make the market continue to stay tight.

Pick up black powder. The fundamentals of marksman are the same, the pace makes you concentrate more, and you can make damn near all the supplies if necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I will tell you friom my not uninformed perspective that we are looking at several years backlog in the shooting industry. That is regardless of legislation. New firearm sales have driven demand and despite the shooting sports industry gearing up production, they are struggling with supply chain issues like everyone else.
Following the laws of supply and demand, we can expect demand to remain high and supply to possibly increase assuming raw materials can be resourced from other areas/industries.
There is a strong push for automation, believe it or not the production of ammunition is a very labor intensive activity.
Short answer, dry fire practice, laser simulations and airguns may need to take up some of your shooting time unless your wallet is much thicker than mine.
I have a feeling you are correct. We were spoiled during the Trump years. Between an incredible amount of people buying their first guns and needing ammo for those guns, a 2nd Amendment hostile administration/congress, and general supply chain problems, this is not going away anytime soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Maybe my stash is deeper than other's, but i don't get the obsession with replacing every round fired. Having an ammo fort is so you can draw it down a bit in times like this.

The supply side of this mess makes it hard to guess when things will loosen up. You can see the coming republican landslide in the midterms already. In past cycles that has meant that demand tends to calm down and the market eases up. Will it repeat this time? Hard to say. The general level of mess in the supply chain, the potential for widespread violence from the left, and the real likelihood that we are in an inflationary cycle may make the market continue to stay tight.

Pick up black powder. The fundamentals of marksman are the same, the pace makes you concentrate more, and you can make damn near all the supplies if necessary.
For me the need to replace my supply goes like this.

I have a number in my head that I am comfortable with for every caliber. It is a high number and I am above it.

But I am not as far above as I was in January of 2020 when I last bought ammo. Tomorrow will likely take me below that number in at least one caliber. I like to shoot and take my family shooting which I have done over the last year. I have taken new shooters during that time. If I go below I will still not be hurting for a long time, but much like budgeting money I set numbers in my head for a reason and try to stick to those numbers. While I may not replace what I shoot, I do want to replace what they shoot.

The number I have in mind for calibers is what I feel comfortable with if the world goes completely to hell tomorrow and the ability to replace ammo is completely shut off. I want to keep my ammo supplies at that number or above which is why I am looking to replace it.
 

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When I take my family shooting obviously the ammo is on me. If I take a new shooter out or friends out I tell them they need to cover the cost of the ammo they use ( todays prices ) When I go by myself now I just fill my mags i`ll be using and when they are empty I collect my shells and maybe some lead from the berms and head for home.
 

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For me the need to replace my supply goes like this.

I have a number in my head that I am comfortable with for every caliber. It is a high number and I am above it.

But I am not as far above as I was in January of 2020 when I last bought ammo. Tomorrow will likely take me below that number in at least one caliber. I like to shoot and take my family shooting which I have done over the last year. I have taken new shooters during that time. If I go below I will still not be hurting for a long time, but much like budgeting money I set numbers in my head for a reason and try to stick to those numbers. While I may not replace what I shoot, I do want to replace what they shoot.

The number I have in mind for calibers is what I feel comfortable with if the world goes completely to hell tomorrow and the ability to replace ammo is completely shut off. I want to keep my ammo supplies at that number or above which is why I am looking to replace it.
I understand. Maybe my ability to cast and reload makes me a lot less antsy about the exact number of loaded shells I have on hand for any given cartridge.
 

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One of my mistakes was not getting into reloading when prices were low and components were cheap/readily available.
I totally agree. I only know how to Reload my 12 gauge shells. I wanted to get into reloading all my other ammo but at the time ammo was cheap and the equipment for reloading was pretty expensive. Now components are very expensive and very hard to find. So i`ll continue to reload my 12 gauge and shoot my other stuff sparingly
 

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Start assembling stuff. You can buy a press, scale, dies, and powder dispenser at non crazy prices right now. Bullets are available if you look. That just leaves primers and powder. They show up from time to time online and at retail stores. This fall I scored 3 bricks of small rifle primers at retail for under $60 each.

Start with a manual or two.
 

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Yes, this has totally changed my practice habits. Where I used to go just blast off some rounds and work on accuracy, now I have picked up drills that use far less ammo but are designed to incorporate movement and startegy.

For example, loading only 3 rounds in each mag and setting up 3 different targets. 2 shots to center mass, one to the head. Gun is empty, need a quick reload.....buddy yells threat at your 9, turn and engage next target, etc, etc...

Or the 666 drill - 6 yards/6 shots/ 6 seconds....someone loads your first mag with say 3 rounds, when the slide locks back, you gotta slap a new mag in and finish the 6 shots.

Or running between shots....

IMO the ammo shortage has actually helped my gun skills.....
 

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Yes, this has totally changed my practice habits. Where I used to go just blast off some rounds and work on accuracy, now I have picked up drills that use far less ammo but are designed to incorporate movement and startegy.

For example, loading only 3 rounds in each mag and setting up 3 different targets. 2 shots to center mass, one to the head. Gun is empty, need a quick reload.....buddy yells threat at your 9, turn and engage next target, etc, etc...

Or the 666 drill - 6 yards/6 shots/ 6 seconds....someone loads your first mag with say 3 rounds, when the slide locks back, you gotta slap a new mag in and finish the 6 shots.

Or running between shots....

IMO the ammo shortage has actually helped my gun skills.....
I am mostly a hunter, so I practice specific shots in addition to general accuracy. I seem to always stumble across deer while walking. After blowing a shot last year that I took too long to line up, I spent a bunch of quality time walking along with the musket not at the ready, lifting, and taking the shot within a 3 count. I was actually standing still when I saw the doe this year, but all that practice made an unsupported shot with a long, heavy musket relatively easy.
 

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I have a family property that works well as a place to shoot with a natural backstop. Guests can shoot as much .22LR as they want and I have no concern on cost. I usally shoot a bunch of .22LR to start anyways, and it is good practice and cheap to blast through a ton of it. With ammo prices increasing - any guest can shoot a Ruger Standard pistol, mini revolver, rough rider - SAA clone, 10/22, with no limits to how much ammo gets used. My experience is most people bring and want to work with some of their own equipment and have ammo for it. I also picked up a 9mm carbine, just so I could use more of the cheap 9mm I picked up a few years ago. We'll shoot .45 and .223 and a variety of cartrdiges, but - we're not just blasting it, a few magazines per person usually satisfies and we move onto the next firearm for everyone to try, and we run out of time. I've seen cheap 9mm for less than 30 cents a round, which honestly isn't that much. Just be a bit more strategic and aware of what you're doing and you should be able to cut that estimated cost in half pretty easy. Unless they are jerks, and I assume they are not, they'll get it - and you'll still have an excellent range trip.
 

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Well, you can reload if you can find primers. I can find powder, bullets, and range brass, but no primers. Then you can shoot pellet rifles and pistols for target practice. You can get into archery. You can find plenty of black powder these days, so you could get into flintlock rifles and pistols. You also can learn to trap animals that are legal.

The absolute best book for reloading is the Lyman's reloading manual. It covers various bullet weights and brands of powders for their charts, not just one brand. It also tells you how to get into the basics. I used the Lyman manual and read everything I could on the internet on reloading as well as asking people who reloaded to learn. I reload rifle and pistol loads that cost less than half what premium ammo costs for the same results. I was going to get into reloading shotgun shells several years ago, but found the components per case of shells only about $10 less than Walmart prices. Now I wish I had, because shot shells are hard to find now. I was shooting 100 or more rounds per outing shooting sporting clays. 25 rounds per skeet, trap, or 5 stand shoot. I used a lot of shells real fast.

Also, to keep from using so much ammo sighting in your rifle get a green laser that goes into your bore of your. You can see a green laser at 100 yards in broad daylight on your target. Then adjust your scope or sights. Saves a lot of sighting in. The one I have is called SiteLite. It goes from 22 caliber to 45 caliber. Then it has adapters for 12 and 20 gauge for sighting in shotguns to shoot slugs. Saves a ton of ammo. You can pre-sight it at 25' indoors for 100 yards with their target. I aim through my kitchen down the hall. It is 25' from my kitchen breakfast bar counter to my bedroom door. It is on the target at 100 yards before you even shoot.

Due to the fact that the SiteLite has a rat tail that sticks down your barrel, it is only good for longer barreled pistols if you have pistols with adjustable sights.
 

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enjoyed an afternoon with some buds at an outdoor range yesterday...some 5.56 and some 9mm. I tend to take some preloaded mags and when those are dry, I call it a day. so 60rds of 5.56.
the 9mm mags (20rds) were 8 deep and I wasn't shooting worth a darn, and was also sighting in a new romeo pro. found me digging into a spare box from my shoot bag.

point is, when I got back home to reload all the empty mags, I was pulling from a couple green cans and i didn't like the feeling of seeing those cans less than packed full.

I still have plenty of inventory, so one 50cal can not being stuffed isn't the end of the world, but I will be on the lookout for some sale prices after Christmas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Start assembling stuff. You can buy a press, scale, dies, and powder dispenser at non crazy prices right now. Bullets are available if you look. That just leaves primers and powder. They show up from time to time online and at retail stores. This fall I scored 3 bricks of small rifle primers at retail for under $60 each.

Start with a manual or two.
Sounds like a plan. One thing I have been doing is saving my brass over the last year and a 1/2 so there is that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Well, you can reload if you can find primers. I can find powder, bullets, and range brass, but no primers. Then you can shoot pellet rifles and pistols for target practice. You can get into archery. You can find plenty of black powder these days, so you could get into flintlock rifles and pistols. You also can learn to trap animals that are legal.

The absolute best book for reloading is the Lyman's reloading manual. It covers various bullet weights and brands of powders for their charts, not just one brand. It also tells you how to get into the basics. I used the Lyman manual and read everything I could on the internet on reloading as well as asking people who reloaded to learn. I reload rifle and pistol loads that cost less than half what premium ammo costs for the same results. I was going to get into reloading shotgun shells several years ago, but found the components per case of shells only about $10 less than Walmart prices. Now I wish I had, because shot shells are hard to find now. I was shooting 100 or more rounds per outing shooting sporting clays. 25 rounds per skeet, trap, or 5 stand shoot. I used a lot of shells real fast.

Also, to keep from using so much ammo sighting in your rifle get a green laser that goes into your bore of your. You can see a green laser at 100 yards in broad daylight on your target. Then adjust your scope or sights. Saves a lot of sighting in. The one I have is called SiteLite. It goes from 22 caliber to 45 caliber. Then it has adapters for 12 and 20 gauge for sighting in shotguns to shoot slugs. Saves a ton of ammo. You can pre-sight it at 25' indoors for 100 yards with their target. I aim through my kitchen down the hall. It is 25' from my kitchen breakfast bar counter to my bedroom door. It is on the target at 100 yards before you even shoot.

Due to the fact that the SiteLite has a rat tail that sticks down your barrel, it is only good for longer barreled pistols if you have pistols with adjustable sights.
Thanks for the info, I will keep it in mind. I do a fair amount of archery shooting already so there is that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I have a family property that works well as a place to shoot with a natural backstop. Guests can shoot as much .22LR as they want and I have no concern on cost. I usally shoot a bunch of .22LR to start anyways, and it is good practice and cheap to blast through a ton of it. With ammo prices increasing - any guest can shoot a Ruger Standard pistol, mini revolver, rough rider - SAA clone, 10/22, with no limits to how much ammo gets used. My experience is most people bring and want to work with some of their own equipment and have ammo for it. I also picked up a 9mm carbine, just so I could use more of the cheap 9mm I picked up a few years ago. We'll shoot .45 and .223 and a variety of cartrdiges, but - we're not just blasting it, a few magazines per person usually satisfies and we move onto the next firearm for everyone to try, and we run out of time. I've seen cheap 9mm for less than 30 cents a round, which honestly isn't that much. Just be a bit more strategic and aware of what you're doing and you should be able to cut that estimated cost in half pretty easy. Unless they are jerks, and I assume they are not, they'll get it - and you'll still have an excellent range trip.
They both understood when I texted them. I have a feeling they will be shooting less and taking their time tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
When I take my family shooting obviously the ammo is on me. If I take a new shooter out or friends out I tell them they need to cover the cost of the ammo they use ( todays prices ) When I go by myself now I just fill my mags i`ll be using and when they are empty I collect my shells and maybe some lead from the berms and head for home.
Yep, the days of me covering the cost are over unfortunately. Sign of the times. I remember back int he 90’s and early 2000’s I use to go camping a lot in Pa. I would take the NorthEast extension. At the times tolls were only 60 cents or so for the ride. I use give the toll taker 3 dollars and tell them I was covering the next 4 cars that came along. Last time I went up that way it was something like 8 or 9 dollars. I did not cover any of the cars behind me. I miss doing stuff like that.
 
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