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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is your experience with these?
Once made in japan but looks like chinese made since about 2017. The aaa are under a buck and claimed life is 1000x. Thats pretty good if true but many negative reviews. AA are about double the price and power provided.
 

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I use Amazon rechargeable batteries for work everyday (supplied to us) and we use them tough. They work for a few months of constant use. I'd imagine if used less you could get more life out of them. We use the AAA and AA. They get charged and rotated about once a week of 3-4 days in the field of use.
The way I read this, you get one cycle a week for 2-3 months. That’s not very impressive.
 

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I'm leery about batteries from Amazon these days. Amazon Basics used to be made in Japan, but I've heard that isn't the case anymore. A little more expensive, but a much longer reputation of performance are Panasonic (previously Sanyo) Eneloop batteries.

ROCK6
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Right now the aaa amazon basics rechargeable 8 pack is $10.99 + 20% discount. So considerably cheaper than the better eneloops. Might be a good time to get a pack or 2 to try.
 

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I have Night Owl brand batteries, also available on amazon. I charged one set in a head lamp every 2 days this past winter for about 4 months. I would buy them again if needed but they seam to be doing just fine.
 

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The way I read this, you get one cycle a week for 2-3 months. That’s not very impressive.
Sorry if I mistyped but we use and recharge every week. So, it's in rotation every other week basically. We carry a set of back ups. They last quite awhile considering the usage.
 

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We use EBL, Amazonbasics and Tenergy. So far none have let us down. Use to do the cheap Chinese off brands and they all went bad in short order.

Overall the EBL and Amazonbasics have been the best.
 

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I use Amazon Basic AA in our main utility building electronic door locks. 5 entry doors total and all are connected to a server with each employee using a wireless key fob for entry. Four of the doors require 4 batteries and one door requires 8. I bought 32 batteries two years ago and rotate them monthly. 2 of them have failed so far. Pretty good batteries in my opinion.
 

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Been using Amazon Basics and EBL for a long time now. They are both good performers, I think amazon is a bit better but not by much. It seems to take a few more charge cycles to get the EBL brand charging up to rated storage from my experience. I charge mine once to twice a week and they do seem to last as expected. I have some going on three plus years now with no issues so far.
 

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We use EBL, Amazonbasics and Tenergy. So far none have let us down. Use to do the cheap Chinese off brands and they all went bad in short order.

Overall the EBL and Amazonbasics have been the best.
You would think that buying quality, say energizer brand batteries would mean they are reliable. It's not the case. I had a energizer lithium AA cell go completely dead in one of my trail cameras this fall. It was one of 8 in the camera and only lasted 28days before dead. I replaced them and it's now been 5 months. That single cell cost me $60-80 in gas just to drive there and back to replace. I have a solar camera coming.
 

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I use Amazon rechargeable batteries for work everyday (supplied to us) and we use them tough. They work for a few months of constant use. I'd imagine if used less you could get more life out of them. We use the AAA and AA. They get charged and rotated about once a week of 3-4 days in the field of use.
What exactly do you use them for? That would give us a good frame of reference for their quality.

We use their non-rechargeables and love them. Don't know if they're Japanese or Chinese though, we stocked up a while back and haven't started to run low yet.
 

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What exactly do you use them for? That would give us a good frame of reference for their quality.

We use their non-rechargeables and love them. Don't know if they're Japanese or Chinese though, we stocked up a while back and haven't started to run low yet.
I work for the property appraiser, so we take dozens of photos of 15 - 20 properties a day. We also use a Bosch laser to measure just about everything possible. I think that's quite a bit of use in a week.
 

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Piggy backing your thread...it new batteries are put in a sealed plastic bag with O2 absorber, how good will they be 10 years later? hold 100% of a charge?
 

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Piggy backing your thread...it new batteries are put in a sealed plastic bag with O2 absorber, how good will they be 10 years later? hold 100% of a charge?
skip the O2 absorber. Try silica gel or rice to keep moisture out. Many lithium batteries will last 10 years. Most rechargeables will lose about 10% a year. So charge them every year or two.
 

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if new batteries are put in a sealed plastic bag with O2 absorber, how good will they be 10 years later? hold 100% of a charge?
It's a poor practice with batteries. They're consumable, even the researchable ones. Many of the chemistries can get damaged if they're discharged too low. Even with NiMH, low-self-discharge (LSD) batteries like Eneloop should be charged up every two-three years if not used. Lithium-ion batteries, in most cases must maintain a voltage above 2.5V before they start to break down and decompose; the environment should be dry, or low humidity - without dust, or a corrosive gas atmosphere. There are a lot of variables, but the biggest factors that affect battery storage are temperature and humidity. While putting them in the fridge isn't a bad thing, the problem is often humidity. While capacity degradation is still evolving, it's pretty safe to say that quality NiMH and Li-Ion batteries, if stored in cooler, dry environments and charged at least annually, will likely be useable for a couple decades even if the capacity and performance drops some. Measuring battery "cycles" has too many variables, but most are (likely, overly-conservative) rated for 300-500 recharge cycles.

ROCK6
 
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