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Hot breakfast cereals:

cream of wheat
corn meal mush (polenta)
rice (we would eat leftover cooked rice with milk, cinnamon and sugar)
cooked whole wheat berries(put in water at night and it will help with the cooking time in the morning)

You have a milk allergy, but there are probably more alternative milks being sold in the US than actual milk now--soy, oat, pea milk. We've all seen it, you have too.
 

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Depends on whether you like it or not. Personally, I just don't like it. No matter how much I rinse it (and I buy pre rinsed to start with), it's bitter. I don't like the texture either. I like most grains, but there are a few, such as quinoa and millet that I just don't care for.

I still eat it occasionally. Mostly trying to find a way to prepare it that I like it better. It's a hearty and healthy grain, so I keep trying. Same with brown rice.
I like it cooked with diced tomatoes like your favorite type of Rotel.
 

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Rice with sweet add ins and plant milk of choice.
Also can cook down the rice to where its like what they feed babies. Called Congee or Jook. Can make it sweet or savory. Look up yt vids on recipes.
Quinoa
Cream of Wheat
Quinoa
Buckwheat
Soups
Leftovers from other meals
 

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We always have a jar of wheat germ in the pantry. It can be eaten dry, with milk, or added to a wide variety of foods for a nutrition and texture improvement. Try adding it to oatmeal or yogurt for breakfast.
I make a jar of overnight oatmeal every couple of weeks, to last for a few mornings meals. Lots of recipes on line, and a huge variety of ingredients to add to the oats. Get up in the morning, take a portion out of the fridge, eat it cold, or heated. Great nutritious quick meal.
We also bake up a batch of Morning Glory Muffins every month or so, and freeze them. Put one on the counter to thaw over night, and breakfast is ready when you get up. Reciepes on line vary, pick one with the ingredients you like.
 

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Regular oats can be nearly "instant" if you use 1/2 cup regular oatmeal and 1 cup water in an 1100 watt microwave for about 1 minute - adjust the timing for YOUR microwave's actual power output (smaller amounts OK, just keep the proportions the same and adjust the timing). Use a fairly deep dish (most Corningware works well) as the oatmeal WILL foam up during cooking and it WILL boil over if the dish is shallow - or try 30 seconds followed by abother 30 seconds to control the boil.

I prefer cinnamon and brown sugar on my oatmeal but nutmeg and brown sugar also work. Try honey - not the commonly available sweet Orange Blossom honey but the more robust honeys such as Bamboo and a number of others. If you can't find those honeys locally, I've always gotten good service from www.beefolks.com in MD (no connection other than satisfied customer).
 

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For breakfast oatmeal, we prepare our oatmeal the evening before by soaking each serving in its cooking water plus a splash of vinegar or lime juice.
The slight acidity helps dispel the pesticides innate to every plant -- lectins, phytic acid, phytates.

Without soaking in this very weak acid, we notice an increase in mucus and inflammation.

Another benefit to this overnight soak -- cook time is significantly reduced.

Our only recipe everybody agrees is magnificent:
* haggis!
We use a ground meat such as wild boar or venison, although I suppose commercial store-bought meats could work.
For our haggis, we mix oatmeal prepared in the breakfast style (above), then add our browned seasoned ground meat.
Mix, and enjoy!
This recipe eliminates stuffing a sheep stomach and boiling, so I suppose it's not quite a traditional haggis...
 

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Millet

You can buy it on Amazon or Bob's Red Mill. Cooks like rice, small round seeds like quinoa. Eaten by a third of the world.

z
 

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Millet

You can buy it on Amazon or Bob's Red Mill. Cooks like rice, small round seeds like quinoa. Eaten by a third of the world.

z
Millet is supposed to be quite nutritious too. I just don't like it. I suggest folks try it before stocking deep. Really try it, as in several meals with it in a row, or use it regularly for a week or two. Sometimes things don't taste so bad until you've had it a few times. I sorta liked quinoa the first few times I had it. But I came to dislike it in short order.
 

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Amaranth is super easy to make porridge from. 1 part dry amaranth to 2 parts milk or water, boil and then simmer 20 minutes.

Amaranth is also a great stealth food. You can grow it in your front yard as an ornamental with no one the wiser because the plant is pretty and doesn't look like a grain or grass.
 

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The entire amaranth plant is edible also. I have grown it a few times. The leaves make great greens and tender stems have an interesting flavor sort of between asparagus and mild horseradish. They grow fast and resist bugs and diseases well. You can clip and eat leaves all throughout the growing season without hurting the plant.
 

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It's kinda fun reading this thread after just eating a big bowl of oatmeal. For those who have peanut powder on hand, try adding a spoonful to your oats. Not only does it taste really good, but it makes a more complete protein profile. Most food powders are kinda lame, but tomato and peanut powder are amazing, with a zillion uses.
What brand of tomato powder do you get Mike?
 

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Discussion Starter #78
As much as I hate to admit it, given all the negative connotations it carries around where I live, I've found something that seems to be working for me now.



A cup of this in the morning dry, along with coffee and I'm good till lunch. Texture is perfect and taste is ok. So now just to figure out how to make it store and if I can make my own.

Thanks everyone for all the posts and help.

-Ash
 

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As much as I hate to admit it, given all the negative connotations it carries around where I live, I've found something that seems to be working for me now.



A cup of this in the morning dry, along with coffee and I'm good till lunch. Texture is perfect and taste is ok. So now just to figure out how to make it store and if I can make my own.

Thanks everyone for all the posts and help.

-Ash
I like good granola. I used to buy the high dollar small package organic stuff. Then I stumbled across Quaker's natural granola in Sam's Club. Big package, cheap price, no artificial ingredients and tasted as good or better than the expensive stuff. Then, of course, being typical for Sam's Club, they stopped carrying it.

I've made homemade granola a bunch of times. I find it too much work for what you get. I'd rather just buy it if I can find a good deal.
 

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As much as I hate to admit it, given all the negative connotations it carries around where I live, I've found something that seems to be working for me now.



A cup of this in the morning dry, along with coffee and I'm good till lunch. Texture is perfect and taste is ok. So now just to figure out how to make it store and if I can make my own.

Thanks everyone for all the posts and help.

-Ash
A guy that used to live around the corner from us made a fortune off granola. He didn't invent it but ended up owning the name and sold the rights to use it. That was back in the 70's.
 
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