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Only politics *****.
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In a controlled environment he may have won, but he was malnurished and starting to go psychologically. He still thinks someone can just "bug out" in the wild with some gear and "thrive"?.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
In a controlled environment he may have won, but he was malnurished and starting to go psychologically. He still thinks someone can just "bug out" in the wild with some gear and "thrive"?.
Or he made a really good video on a 15 pound bag a lot of us could learn something from. He calls it a BOB, which it probably is for someone with his experience, but for me it's a really good get home bag. I'm pretty sure he mentions using it in that capacity a few times.

I don't think a lot of wise people view any one bag system as something allowing them to go into the wild and "thrive". We still have to do our best to prepare.
 

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Improvise Adapt Overcome!
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In a controlled environment he may have won, but he was malnurished and starting to go psychologically. He still thinks someone can just "bug out" in the wild with some gear and "thrive"?.
I wonder how things would have gone, if he had been free to move around more? For example, what would a trapline, with a dozen snare traps have provided him?

Obviously, he would have needed better cordage than fishing line. A good roll of bankline at minimum would have been needed.

The interesting thing about Alone, is they did give them a lot, but shorted them in several key areas, like not letting them have enough cordage, and carry a variety of cordage. For some reason, they were kind of weird about firestarters too. Mine, for example, which is a firesteel, magnesium rod, garden tool sharpener (used as the scraper) and a waterproofed leather patch, all on a bootlace lanyard, would have been against the rules and not allowed.

I do find it odd that there was very little trapping shown in the two seasons. At best, there was the use of a deadfall to catch a mouse here and there...which is about useless as anything but bait.
 

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Only politics *****.
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I think he'd still be malnurished. He's one of those who ate best from what i could gather. And the psychological issues came up quite clearly by the end. Physically, he might have been able to stay there a while longer, but he was at the breaking point. Don't get me wrong. He's very knowledgeable, did better than i could hope of doing and i have nothing but respect for what he did. But i just don't belief in "i'm going out in the woods and thrive", actually working out (depending on where you are in the world, but even those who withdraw, have some trades for things they just can't provide for on their own like salt just to give one example.).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I went back and watched it again today and he recommends poly and wool shirts. I've been accumulating wool, but outside of heavy winter fleece poly is harder for me.

Who makes a good long sleeve button up poly shirt? Most I've found have cotton in them. Does anyone make a strong t-shirt out of poly or would I be better just sticking to wool with t-shirts?
 

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Your BOB should be an extension of your plan. That defines the mission parameters of the bag. There are certain basics all BOBs should cover (survival kit type things)

A BOB should be where you are. If you are out in the car, put in car. If at home, in home. I prefer to have more than one (after all these years doing this) in different locations so that no matter what direction I leave in I have options to grab.

If you want to keep one in your car, build a separate GHB specifically for that purpose. That way, if need your BOB, the car can (with its GHB) actually serve as a resupply (basically is an addition to your BOB).

I TOTALLY agree with him about batteries for lights and such as well as the Sawyer filter. I also like the idea of duct tape on the Sawyer. I am going to go do that with all mine.

I also agree with the never setting a knife down; sheath it. I was on a survival course when I was 16 and saw the result of someone slipping and cutting their hand when getting up because they had put the knife into a log where they were working. After that, my instructor made a point of stressing blade control and awareness at all times in a survival situation. I have never forgot the sight of the insides of that kid's hand and that lesson stuck to me like glue.

I totally agree with his "tarp over tent" argument. The only pack I have with a tent is my INCH bag.

I also totally agree with his philosophy of bringing things so you don't have to make them. Yes you can make cordage and such, but if you bring it with you it is one less task and gives you extra time for other things.

One thing I LOVE that he said was pointing out his checklist is different from another person's. His water, shelter, fire etc list is basic survival kit stuff...the needs of a BOB are based on mission needs (like he said: how far you have to walk, etc).

I like the "Plan A, B, C..." thing too....very much agree with that. I also liked his discussion of adjusting the bag for area going to be in or time of year as well as keeping it current... TONS of people do not think about that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What kind of pants would you all suggest to conform to his "no cotton" suggestion? Most work pants are cotton.
 

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What kind of pants would you all suggest to conform to his "no cotton" suggestion? Most work pants are cotton.
There are lots of poly/cotton blends that are better then just pure cotton. I like prana pants, but Kuhl has some heavier poly/cotton pants for more rugged usage.

Winter you could go with wool pants or some fleece pants with a goretex shell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
There are lots of poly/cotton blends that are better then just pure cotton. I like prana pants, but Kuhl has some heavier poly/cotton pants for more rugged usage.

Winter you could go with wool pants or some fleece pants with a goretex shell.
So as long as it's a cotton poly blend it's alright? When he says he threw all his cotton stuff away I wasn't sure if he was talking about those as well.

Would LAPG pants be decent?
 

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So as long as it's a cotton poly blend it's alright? When he says he threw all his cotton stuff away I wasn't sure if he was talking about those as well.

Would LAPG pants be decent?
65% poly/35% cotton blend...any higher percentage of cotton is not advisable...
 

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What kind of pants would you all suggest to conform to his "no cotton" suggestion? Most work pants are cotton.
https://www.arborwear.com/products/pants/tech-2-pants

These take a beating and keep going. I've met Alan and he had a particular brand of pants he was a fan of. Can't remember the name of them though. I think it was something European. I'll have to see if I can find out. You'll find when it comes to clothes, like many other pieces of gear, you get what you pay for. LAPG, Propper, True-Spec etc. will generally hold up ok for casual use but not hard knocks, at least in my experience.
 

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Free-ish Man
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Pants with a low cotton content if any at all.
Bunch of companies make pants that fit that description. They range from very high priced, top quality to low priced junk. Here's a short list of brands just off the top of my head. In no particular order.

Arborwear
Crye Precision
Propper
True-Spec
Tripe Aught Design
Rail Riders
Kuhl
Carhartt

Again, you generally get what you pay for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Bunch of companies make pants that fit that description. They range from very high priced, top quality to low priced junk. Here's a short list of brands just off the top of my head. In no particular order.

Arborwear
Crye Precision
Propper
True-Spec
Tripe Aught Design
Rail Riders
Kuhl
Carhartt

Again, you generally get what you pay for.
Thanks, SBK. I found the LAPG ones today after a Prepared Mind 101 video called them destruction proof basically. For $21 I thought it was worth a shot if they only end up being work pants.

Arborwear seems nice as long as they hold up. When I read nylon I think ripping on thorns, but considering who they are made for I'm sure that's not an issue. They aren't priced too badly either.

What about Fire Hose pants?
 

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Free-ish Man
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Arborwear seems nice as long as they hold up. When I read nylon I think ripping on thorns, but considering who they are made for I'm sure that's not an issue. They aren't priced too badly either.

What about Fire Hose pants?
I do tree work and construction for a living. Running chain saws, climbing trees, dragging brush, picking up logs, finishing concrete etc. can be very hard on clothes. I can vouch for the durability of the nylon Arborwear pants. Nylon can be very tough stuff. It's what almost all modern web gear is made of after all. Only thing they don't do well really is anything involving fire. Welding in them is a no go as is any situation where you're likely to be dealing with flames. Fire Hose pants are quite tough from what I understand. I have a buddy that swears by them. They're made of cotton though and are rather heavy.
 
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