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alladin4.jpg
The one piece of equipment that seems to do it all. Providing light equal to a 60 watt light bulb, enough heat output to heat a medium sized area, the ability to cook and bake, and it sips fuel like a miser. The Aladdin lamp does not get much mention but, in my opinion, it is a must have. I would not trade the two I have for anything if I could not replace them. They have been priceless during the many power outages experienced, even rivaling my generators in their importance. Those of you who have one will most likely agree. The Aladdin lamp is far superior to the standard hurricane lamp.

The light output is intense. They say that it is equal to a 60W light bulb but it sure seems brighter when you are relying on it during a power outage. Thanks to the Thorium mantle, the light produced far exceeds that of candles or hurricane lights.

Aladdin lamps burn HOT. A piece of paper held over the chimney will burst into flame immediately. The heat pours out the top to such a degree that it will heat quite a large area. If you live in an apartment or in an area that you cannot have a generator or woodstove, the Aladdin lamp will keep you warm. The heat from these lamps rivals that of the woodstove I use during power outages. Many times it starts to get uncomfortably warm in the rooms that the lamps are being used in even though it is in the teens outside.

Because of the high heat output, it also can be used to cook. Using scrap metal, I fabricated a high cooking tripod that will hold standard pots and pans. You can cook on it by removing the Thorium mantle and just use the wick but I have found it works much better leaving the mantle in place.

Also, by using heat ducting, an oven can be easily fabricated. My first prototype used 8" stovepipe. When I found that this crude oven worked so well, I constructed a better model using rectangular, galvanized ducting available at any home improvement center. Fabrication of an oven is simple. Put together the two halves of the square duct. Then seal both ends with sheet metal, in effect forming a box. One end must be hinged to act as a door, the other end can be permanently fixed. Cut a 3 or 4 inch hole towards the end of one side of the duct and cut the same size hole on the other side of the duct, near the other end. One hole is for the end of the Aladdin lamp chimney top to feed heat into the oven, the other hole is to allow excess heat to escape. I used steel shelving legs (scrap) to support the oven at the height necessary to allow the chimney to come within an inch or so of the heat collection hole. Once into place, a small piece of sheet metal is just laid over the hole cut to allow excess heat to escape. All you have to do is slide it around to reduce or increase the amout of heat that escapes, thus controlling the heat level in the oven. Bread bakes very well using this oven. The bread pan must be supported to allow heat under it, of course. I also wrapped a thin layer of insulation over parts of it. Works great. Not a great cook here but I see no reason why anything can't be baked in it. The high heat of the Aladdin lamp makes its use in this manner possible.

Aladdin lamps burn much cleaner than hurricane lamps and they require little fuel to keep them going. I keep some old dish detergent (squeeze type) plastic bottles filled with standard kerosene for efficient filling. Better than using funnels because you can see when to stop fueling. No, the kerosene won't dissolve the plastic. Have been using the same ones for years.

When using Aladdin lamps, do not leave them unattended. In addition to the high heat hazzard, if you burn them at maximum they may start to form carbon on the mantle. If you get carbon formation on the mantle, simply turn the lamp down and it will burn off gradually. Like any mantle, it will break if abused. The spare parts to be stored include wicks, mantles, a spare chimney, and a wick trimmer. Extra mantles are most important. I have never had to replace a wick or chimney but you never know!

I purchased mine 30+ years ago from NitroPack. I do not know if they still carry them. They are definately worth looking for. Perhaps others know who still sells them. The technology has been around 100 years. There are Aladdin lamps in antique shops although I have found these to be less desireable than the newer ones. The new ones are sold as fancy ones with expensive glass shades or simple ones with aluminum bodies and simple chimneys. I use the simple ones since I am only interested in utility. The fancy ones are beautiful, worthy of a show piece in any home.

After one severe power outage in the the 1980's. I bought 2 dozen of them and sold them where I was working at the time (in a city), making a small profit , of course. Everyone loved them even though they weren't into preparedness as we are. The same lamps were still on the job when I retired. In my opinion, you will not be disappointed if you decide to get one. I also store 60 gallons of kerosene just for these lamp. The lamps work fine with 30 year old, untreated kerosene. They use so little fuel that these 60 gallons will see me through any uncertain future. For your consideration.
 

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Scruggs, really have to thank you for the informative thread. I had been searching around for one of these locally (antique shops want a fortune for some of the more ornate ones) after my oil info request thread. I finally located an on-line supplier and will order one of the aluminum ones to begin with -- which I assume will probably have to have a dish or something that will serve as a hot plate beneath it during use, right? I'm also assuming that despite the fact that it can throw out light comparable to a 60W bulb, it probably wouldn't hurt to place something reflective behind it for maximum light.

At any rate, I had no idea such a lamp would also throw out so much useful heat -- that is truly a God-send when the electricity goes out.
 

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I may be S-L-O-W but I cant seem to find them anywhere. If anyone has a link or a source let me know please, Thanks. S/H
No, no, SurvivalHelper, you are NOT slow -- I had to wade through all kinds of websites (including a number of them that featured Magic Genie-type lamps :rolleyes: and the re-telling of the tale of Alladin's Lamp). HERE'S the thread I found and once you have accessed the lamps, you will find all kinds of them available -- including some of the ones with decorative glass globes.

http://goodpick.com
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I am really bad at finding things on the web. My dial up is so slow:mad:. I rely on this forum and its members heavily. Katbalou seems to have found them. Perhaps you could post where they are available. The antique ones do not take the same parts as the newer ones. I found that out the hard way. The new fancy ones sure are nice but they cost an arm and a leg. I would be terrified of breaking the expensive glass shade. Nope, they do not come with a pan. The bottom of the lamp (fuel tank) remains cool even though heat shoots out the top like a furnace. Good idea about the reflector. We usually set them in the middle of the table. The heat just radiates from them so much it is like sitting around a campfire.

I stopped ordering from NitroPack in the 1980's. They tried to set me up for an interview with some media outlet in California because I was ordering so much from them at the time. Not good for the practice of keeping a low profile! I declined and haven't ordered from there since. Haven't seen them for sale elsewhere. Will poke around and see what I can find if no one else comes up with a source. The wife just said they have a website (Aladdin). Will have to check it out.

Can't remember how much they cost way back then. Like everything else, they probably have gone way up in price. Believe me, you could do a whole lot worse with your survival dollar. They are something you have to see to believe. Well, talk about slow! Katbalou has beaten me to the punch while I was writing.
 

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NICE WORK,KATBALOU! The link you provided is just the ticket. Their most inexpensive model looks much better than the one's I have. Now, I can buy one for my stepson and son. They wanted mine but I told them they have to wait until I kicked the bucket. That's how much I like them (the lamps, not the kids)! Just have to pick up one of the fancier ones for myself. Since they burn so hot, I cant see how they have some that are hung on a wall! Thanks.
 

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. . . That's how much I like them (the lamps, not the kids)!
LOL:)

I.O.U. for telling me/everybody about these lamps. And I wondered about attaching them to a wall, too. I noticed that the brackets holding the lamp extend a bit from the wall but . . . I wouldn't feel comfortable having something with any kind of a flame on a staircase wall or any place where it wasn't always in sight because of the danger of fire.

You know, that brings up another point -- I wondered at the wisdom of paper, cloth or even synthetic shades if these lamps are capable of throwing off a lot of heat. (?)
 

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Can't imagine a cloth shade! They should all be glass. You WILL be sitting around a campfire if any flammables are around the chimney. I should have cleaned them up before I took a picture of them. You can see the red dye from the kerosene on one of them. It gives you an idea of how much they are used. Also, you can see that one of the chimneys in the picture is taller than the other. That one is a "high altitude" chimney. Maybe it helps it burn better at higher elevations. Those in high elevations may know why, I don't. Can't remember why it is on there. Been too long. I have regular kerosene lamps mounted on the walls in specific locations that act as night lights to "get around". I do not worry about them being on the wall because they do not get nearly as hot as the Aladdins. I would venture to say that if you put an Aladdin on the wall you will easily wind up scorching the ceiling, if not the walls too. When burning them, I light my cigarettes by sticking them over the chimney. You have to be quick or they will vaporize the whole thing at once.
 

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My brother got a couple of these during the Y2K thing.
They have seen a lot of use since. His area seems to have power outages fairly often.
He mentioned kerosene, was getting out of sight, cost wise,
 

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Can't imagine a cloth shade! They should all be glass. You WILL be sitting around a campfire if any flammables are around the chimney.
I'm laughing through this post after reading yours but that was what I thought (with respect to the heat and a shade). So, why on earth does the Aladdin Company manufacture those that were pictured on the link I provided with shades that are NOT glass? And they seem to be charging more for this little fire hazard, too! (???) Oh, wait a minute, I think I can guess the answer. It's probably the retail seller who is adding that little touch rather than the Aladdin manufacturer. Well, I'm glad I read your original post re the heat these lamps are capable of throwing out (which makes sense as I recall that the old Coleman kerosene lanterns that my family used to take camping threw out a lot of heat, too). I THOUGHT that putting a shade on these lamps was screwy and asking for trouble.
 
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