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Has any been using air rifles for hunting small game such as squirrels? I was wondering how effective they are. i bought my girl a cricket (small 22) but was thinking of getting an air rifle for her and maybe myself. Cheap ammo. What fps do you think i should be around if I did get one? Just throwing it out there.
 

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Air rifles are a great addition to anyones survival preps. Cheap ammo, easy to carry, not a threat to the government, no license, very quite, and will take small game. I recommend the spring loaded or pump models.
 

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Has any been using air rifles for hunting small game such as squirrels? I was wondering how effective they are. i bought my girl a cricket (small 22) but was thinking of getting an air rifle for her and maybe myself. Cheap ammo. What fps do you think i should be around if I did get one? Just throwing it out there.
Suprisingly, there is little mentioned about airguns and survival, which is sad, since they are so stealthy and you can use them in situations that even a .22 would attract too much attention. There are some SERIOUS air rifles made and they are excellent for hunting small game and vermin. They are very quiet and cheap to shoot, I personally use a Sheridan Blue Streak, but there are easier to use break action spring loaded rifles that develop some excellent velocities (1000fps)
such as some of those at this link (not an endorsement, just a good example)


http://www.airgunsbbguns.com/Beeman_Air_Rifles_at_Cobra_Airguns_com_s/33.htm

As much as I like my Blue Streak it is a 5mm, and a .22 or even a .177 cal might be a better choice due to common availability of pellets (and .177 BBs).
I would also consider scoping it to conserve ammo, BUT spring action air guns have dual direction recoil forces that believe it or don't can mess up a regular rifle scope, so make sure you use an airgun scope made specifically for a spring based air gun, not a cheap co2 or pump up type.

Edit: Per http://www.chuckhawks.com/22_rimfire_cartridges.htm , "The standard velocity .22 Long Rifle takes a wax coated 40 grain RN lead bullet to a muzzle velocity of 1,138 fps. The muzzle energy is 116 ft. lbs. in a standard 22" rifle test barrel."
So you can see the better .22 cal airguns are an excellent choice for hunting rabbits, squirrel and similar sized game.
 

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ruralist
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Effective, once you have aquired high marksmanship with it and can therefore hit upper chest/head. More useful than a small squirrel filled with shotgun pellets too IMO. Will kill squirrels at 800fps in my experience, just don't expect it to work 100% from a considerable distance (30 yards plus). I concur with jfountain on the spring gun choice.
 

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Kibitzer
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In the Sep 2008 issue of Outdoor Life, someone asks what the best bullet for squirrels is.
The shooting editor says his squirrel hunting is done with an air rifle or an old .32-caliber caplock muzzleloader. He does say that short hollowpoints work best when using a 22. You can get "hunter" pellets for your air rifle.
Me, I got laughed off a site for even mentioning air/pellet guns.
I even killed a big old grackle with my Daisy Red Ryder BB gun.
 

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Once you see an old Benjamin-Sheridan pump .22 blowing completely through 1/4 inch plywood you'll feel confident in its ability to take small game.
 

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I have had nothing but trouble with my pellet guns. After the last one I just buy CB Longs for use in my Marlin bolt action. It is stealth (no pumping or breaking) unlike a bb or pellet gun. It has about the same report as a pellet gun also.
 

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sportmans guide has daisy 1000fp for 69.00 i bought one and it shoots great, but it is remanufactured, but has a warrenty with it like a new one.
 

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If you had said shorts, I might have believed you. Or else you've had some very loud pellet guns.
Shorts are WAY loud, sonic crack and all. Can't shoot 'em when neighbors are home. The CB longs are much quieter, but still not as quiet as a pellet rifle, or an Aguila super colibri. Heck, my pellet rifle will shoot some pellets supersonic, and it's terribly loud when it does that. Might as well have shot a .22 lr in the backyard.
 

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If you had said shorts, I might have believed you. Or else you've had some very loud pellet guns.
Maybe you should do some research first. CB Longs have the same amount of powder and lead as the CB shorts. The difference is the case is longer and easier to handle then the shorts.

CB Short Information

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=489754

Technical Information for the CB Short:

Muzzle Velocity: 710 fps
Muzzle Energy: 32 ft. lbs.

CB Long Information

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=638772

Technical Information for the CB Long:

Muzzle velocity: 710 fps
Muzzle energy: 32 ft. lbs.

There is no sonic boom at 710 fps. They are very quiet and they eliminate the need for pellet or bb guns.
 

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Maybe you should do some research first. CB Longs have the same amount of powder and lead as the CB shorts. The difference is the case is longer and easier to handle then the shorts.

CB Short Information

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=489754

Technical Information for the CB Short:

Muzzle Velocity: 710 fps
Muzzle Energy: 32 ft. lbs.

CB Long Information

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=638772

Technical Information for the CB Long:

Muzzle velocity: 710 fps
Muzzle energy: 32 ft. lbs.

There is no sonic boom at 710 fps. They are very quiet and they eliminate the need for pellet or bb guns.
These velocity figures do not mean the same amount of powder or noise. The shorts having less volume will develop higher pressures with less of an equal powder developing the same velocity with LESS powder and therefore less of an explosive report, as there is less powder combusting. These are very basic principles almost every reloader is aware of. Thats why the .22 magnum is louder than the .22 hornet which has greater case volume but when loaded to equal velocities is quieter than a .22 lr.
 

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Behind Enemy Lines
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I've used many different air rifles for small game and most of them worked well. I own 3 rifles. 1 level action daisy [owned it most of my life], a daisy grizzly and now a crosman 2100. I'ved used single pumps, multi-pumps and break barrels. For small game, break barrels or a .22 air rifle would be your best bet, unlike you like a challenge.

Pretty much why I use my air rifle to hunt and not worry about getting a .22 or anything is because of what you mentioned. No license, its cheap, government wont look at me as a threat etc.

Choice is yours. Good luck.
 

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These velocity figures do not mean the same amount of powder or noise. The shorts having less volume will develop higher pressures with less of an equal powder developing the same velocity with LESS powder and therefore less of an explosive report, as there is less powder combusting. These are very basic principles almost every reloader is aware of. Thats why the .22 magnum is louder than the .22 hornet which has greater case volume but when loaded to equal velocities is quieter than a .22 lr.
I have had both apart and the substance inside weighed on a grain scale was the same. I can't remember the weight but it was very little. I have fired both and did not hear any difference. The logic is there but it didn't prove out that way. I switched from shorts to longs for easier handling.

Both rounds are so quiet that the impact of the bullet hitting the target is way louder then the report from the explosion. The 29 grain bullet will do way more damage then a pellet.

For the price of a quality pellet gun I will stick with my old Marlin bolt gun and CCI CB Longs. Moving the bolt is way more stealthy then pumping a pellet gun.

I just do not see any advantage coming from a pellet gun over the 22 bolt and CCI CB Longs.
 

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I have had both apart and the substance inside weighed on a grain scale was the same. I can't remember the weight but it was very little. I have fired both and did not hear any difference. The logic is there but it didn't prove out that way. I switched from shorts to longs for easier handling.

Both rounds are so quiet that the impact of the bullet hitting the target is way louder then the report from the explosion. The 29 grain bullet will do way more damage then a pellet.

For the price of a quality pellet gun I will stick with my old Marlin bolt gun and CCI CB Longs. Moving the bolt is way more stealthy then pumping a pellet gun.

I just do not see any advantage coming from a pellet gun over the 22 bolt and CCI CB Longs.
that doesnt mean that the powder is the same, you cant tell the nitro content by eyeball
 
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