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Indefatigable
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Although I am not a girl who collects shoes, my co-workers used to give me hell for the amount of $ I spent on my duty shoes and hiking boots. I'm still spending money on hiking boots while they are spending money on joint replacements and chiropractors.
Quality footwear won't save you money (short term) but it will save more than your feet.
 

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I like my boots and have been through a number of brands. For everyday boots I like to go for comfort, light weight and more of an athletic fit. Currently that's a pair of Viktos Strife leather mid hight boots. Very comfortable post break-in and haven't fallen apart after about a year. Kind of an urban minimalist combat boot, like much of Viktos clothing. They're discontinued now but I'm planning on picking up a comparable pair of one of their other models. Most of theirs are priced around $140ish. Danners I've found to be solid boots as well and my current pair of work boots is feeling like the most sturdy and comfortable pair of work boots I've bought yet.
 

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I got a pair of Caterpillar work books that seem decent last year and not a high end price, but a major brand. I don't wear them that often, but - they're pretty good, they are decent and not super heavy. I get what you mean about work boots, I like them for winter, and don't have any real winter boots really. I find the work boots give me better balance, for snow and ice than say, a pair of hiking boots. I have no concern for heavily insulated boots, my feat just get sweaty, and in winter that's not a good thing.
 

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Shill for the Federal Gov
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Been wearing the same pair of Danner Romeo's for 6 years now. I have had the same pair of Danner Fort Lewis boots since 1998. They're a little rough now but still work like comfortable boots. Danner stuff has worked good for me.

On another note, I still have a pair of Sorels I bought in 1986 when I got stationed in New England, they are still working good after all of this time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Got a lot of brands to research, though the magnum and Georgia boots look promising. Thanks everyone.

Unless I were planning on wading with them, I’d never buy “jungle boots”. They aren’t “valves”...they are holes with screens. They let water go both ways.
They serve a purpose, in conditions where you are GOING to get water in your boot, and you don’t need insulation nor long service life...they are one answer.

What exactly were your old work boots? Can’t you get them on the open market?
Didn't realize that's what jungle boots meant, glad I asked instead of assuming jungle boot meant a style and not much else. Also, no branding on my boots so I don't think I would be able find another pair on the market (I'm assuming they're probably just some unbranded version of another mass produced sold "exclusively" via a catalog from a prior work place).


Also charliemeyer007, a backup pair or two would probably be good advice. In terms of prepping supplies I'd probably need to focus on a few other items before I put some dough into backup boots, though I'm no stranger to sewing and/or gluing shoes so I guess I got that going for me.
 

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I like Merrell hiking shoes. I get about a year or 2 out of a pair and then trash can them.
I buy 2 pairs at a time. I've been wearing this brand for the last 12 years.

I get mine on sale from here:

I use Muck Boots in the winter / wet weather. Plus currently am experimenting with a pair of waterproof soft toe Wolverine Anthem Wellington boots:

I would not go with a steel toe unless required by a job. Steel toes are cold in the winter and hot in the summer.
 

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I buy Keens, I have 3 different pairs for different jobs. Great boots but read the reviews on sizes.
I'm a Keen fan as well. At the brewery, mine get soaked daily and have saved my toes from keg drops countless times. They last longer than any other brand I have tried. The local shoe chain here also has a buy one pair get the second for half price.
 

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Used Bramma for years, Texas Steer rough out seems to work for me now. Not combat worthy just a good everyday boot. With a good pair of insoles here on the home they work. If I needed them for industrial work (factory or job related) then invest in something with more protection and better made.
 

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Lord of Irrelevance
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I've used Merrill and Keen over the years with good success. Really loving these new ON Cloudrock boots I got so far. Real great rucking option. These will probably become my Mr Rogers option for my GHB

Working a customer facing job when travelling I have to be dressed business casual most all times. Still searching for something that gives me the quick glance appearance of a dress shoe or boot but provides some tactical or outdoor oriented features. Grippy sole, traction and cushioning, waterproof or not doesn't matter. The hunt continues
 

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Have a Redwing store close by? They have a good array of boots to choose from. I got a pair of safety toe boots fro work before I left, they gave us a $130 credit plus the store gave us an additional discount. The list price was $169 and they are comfy, broke in easily.

Now they are $189.
 
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The boots I wear every day to work are some Justins. They look like cowboy boots, but have knobby vibram soles, insulated, waterproof for about 5 hours, and have a steel tow option. This model comes either black or brown.

I wear them every day here in Western Montana, from 98 degree July afternoons to -25 degree February mornings. They get beat to hell every day, since my job as a septic pumper can be rather strenuous. They’re on my feet as I type.

Another guy that I work with has Carolina boots. He’s had this pair for about 4 years.
 

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NRA Life 1971
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I stay away from the china boots.
There are American companies making boots for reasonable prices.
Thorogood, Carolina, and Revolt, are made here using primarily USA made components
Georgia Boot, Danner, Keen, Chippewa, Justin, and Wolverine are also made here but use mostly non USA manufactured parts.
As already stated, boots are a personal decision. That said, I have been using Thorogood products for over 25 yrs.
 

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Go to your local Red Wing store. You might have to take a drive to another city, but totally worth it. Tell em what you want the boot for and try on a few pairs. Spend between $200-300 dollars. I'm partial to the Irish Setters because I hike, The Elk Hunters are sweet nice too if you want a higher boot for snow or combat. and when you wear them out you can get them resoled. Laces replaced and if anything breaks they repair it in their store.
 

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This is a very broad topic, even for “everyday” boots as it depends on your occupation, lifestyle, seasonal changes, and environment.

I have gone the minimalist route for myself. I still have a dozen plus military issued and self-purchased boots, a lot of backpacking boots and shoes; some higher end Danner, Zamberlan, and Wellco combat hiking boots for off-trail terrain, and a variety of decent, “work-casual” boots.

If I had to choose every day wear, I would probably go with my Belleville Mini-Mil boots. Kind of a thinner sole, very low heel rise jungle boot. Light, comfortable, tactile, good ground feel with little foot fatigue. If I’m not in minimalist sandals working around the house, I’m likely in a pair of my Mini-Mils. I have a black pair that doesn’t get used a ton, but if I did more traveling away from home and had to choose a pair of boots, that would be it.

All that said above, if I wanted heavier duty boot, I would be looking a good pair of stitch-welted, Vibram-soled boots. Heavy boots suck, tall heels suck (for me), most people really don't "walk" far with heavy boots. I want fast and light...the best foot protection is fast feet! ;)

ROCK6
 

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Although I am not a girl who collects shoes, my co-workers used to give me hell for the amount of $ I spent on my duty shoes and hiking boots. I'm still spending money on hiking boots while they are spending money on joint replacements and chiropractors.
Quality footwear won't save you money (short term) but it will save more than your feet.
Wow , we actually agree 👍 on something. I've got pretty feet for a grunt and Fabio long hair. 😂
 

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I bought a pair of $50 Bramah work/hiking boots at Walmart this Summer. They're holding up surprisingly well. I'm very happy with them.
 

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None of your business.
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I know this thread might be trying to find the holy grail of boots….but there isn’t such a thing IMHO.

get the right boots/shoes for the job. Here is what I prefer.

1. For hiking and hunts in the back-country under decent weather conditions: Lowa Alpine or Kenetrek Boots
2. For general garden or yard work, calf high Muck Boots.
3. For sub 20F temps and snow, shoveling,etc, high Cut Arctic Muck Boots.
4. for General work around the garage; Merrel or Keene Boots/shoes.
5. for House shoes, Birkenstock (don’t judge).
6. Sailing, barefoot.
7. Beach, Sandels Or flip flops.
8. for everyday casual and work wear, Ariat Boots.

If you have different pairs for the job, your boot/shoe wardrobe should last you a long time. Quality matters.
 
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