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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Over the past month I have spoken to a number of the new folks and one common thread with them is where do I start. If you were giving them advice as to what things to do first, what would be your top ten things to do first month. It may be more but this seems to be very important right now. Most are on limited budgets. Figure they have $100 to $300 tops a month to prepare. Figure they have loved ones half way across the country. Where should they start. After the first month where should they be. Prepared for how many days? After two months and three months? I think from speaking to a number of the new guys this would be a great help to them.

They need to know the shortcuts and things to do in their planning. Thanks for all the help you guys give. God Bless.
 

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Iēsous
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300 dollars

3 traps for around 30 bucks, used
1 pellet gun , used 20 bucks
thin wire for snares , 20 bucks
1 decent knife, 50 bucks


this last one will spark debate but here goes

1 rem 870 12 ga pump shot gun like the one I got at the pawn shop for 156.00

For guys like me who are not exceptional marksmen and who lack the training

a 12 ga fits well, loaded with 000 , 00, 000, 00 etc.. is a Formidable

close range weapon to deal with, and since were talking pattern theres

much more chance a newb will hit his target
 

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Freedom Is Not Free
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One method I use is to add to my food preps on every shopping trip. I add five spaces to the bottom of my list and as I go through the store I fill these in. I'll look for sales on items that I know I'll use. Then they go in the cart and I fill in the blank spaces on the list. When I get home these items get added to the pantry. It may seem small, but try it and see how your stocks grow with a little effort and not a big hit in the budget.
 

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The shopping list ideal is a good one, I look for the 2 for 1 sales.

As for starting equipment (+/-)
Good pair of boots
Good sheath knife
Fishing line/Lots of assorted hooks.
I'd go w/the used 12 Ga. also.

Not a long list, but would get you up and running.
 

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I would personally focus more on food and water. Guns and knives are nice and are necessary but if your too hungry to wield them you s.o.l.
Depending on what your priorities are and the type of plan your are thinking would be a good guideline on what to buy for preps. For example if your planning on meeting up with your loved ones you might want to consider extra fuel/fuel system.
I would also avoid getting fishing/trapping equipment at the onset or if the area your in is not conducive for it. It would be better to prioritize your equipment buys and if you can't get them that month save the money till you can. It's easy to nickel and dime yourself with a whole bunch of small stuff that could be used but may not be necessary.
 

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FNG
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-12ga with bird and buck shot
-decent knife
-fire starter (fire steel, flint, mag block...ext)
-small fishing kit
-water purifier
-cold or hot weather gear depending on where you live
-assorment of small camping goods (fork, knife, a pot, and cup)
 

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I might start with figuring how much food and water you need per person per day.(I know there are min requirements ,but also at times this varies based on family members with special needs.)Then maybe take an inventory of your stock of goods on hand.Start filling in maybe with $30.00 wk for food and $30.00 a week for other supplies(backpacks ,lights,first aid kits etc.)It would build pretty quick.If something is more expensive just hold a couple weeks of your supply money aside and you will progress fine.Just remember you don't have to do it all in a week,month etc.It is a process of stocking,rotating and honing skills,needs etc.Also very important to me knowledge is the best tool you can acquire.Ask, Read,Practice.Just my 2 cents.
 

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I started out way back when Survivalist was not a bad word. I carried more in my vehicle than most folks have stocked now! I had 6 weapons and 1000 rds of ammo for each. I carried MREs for 60 days for 1 person along with camping gear and first aid equipment and I was in the Marine Corps at the time. Now a days I call myself a Prepper! As in I am preparing myself and my family for certain scenarios.To answer your question it all depends on the person and their level of experience! The main thing for anyone starting out is research,research,research! With the internet there are lots of great resources out there! Then you have to ask!

1) Do I want to remain where I am if a catastrophic event occurs? Or do I want to bug out to a safer location? Do I have resources that I could use at my current location?
2) Do I want to get to the point that I am comfortable and have peace of mind or do I just want to get by if SHTF?
3) Have you even held or used a firearm of any kind? If so what were you most comfortable with? If the answer is no start looking for firearms familiarization courses or ask friends or family that have used firearms to teach you and give you some pointers!
4) What is my level of debt to income ratio? How much can I afford to put toward my preps each week, every 2 weeks or every month. Do not get so caught up in spending that you lose your home!
5) When you purchase a firearm get proficient with it! It does you no good sitting in the closet in new condition until you need it.
6) When you do start stocking your pantry, utility room or basement make sure you are buying food stuffs in a variety that you and your family will consume. I like Spam as much as the next person. Especially fried crisp! But man,woman or child cannot live by Spam alone. You are trying to prevent Food Fatigue.
7) How many firearms you have is up to you as is how much ammo to keep on hand. As was suggested before a good sidearm, Center fire rifle and a shotgun is a good start. These do not have to be brand new! There are some well maintained used firearms in the Pawnshops. At cheaper prices than new. What I like to do when I am looking for another firearm is to price the model I want at the brand new price and then find it used. The difference in price I put toward more food stocks or add to my first aid equipment.

As for me I will be staying where I am. I live in the mtns and the nearest town is 6 miles away with a population of about 800 actually within city limits. I have a mountain to the south of me and 1 to the north of me that offer protection from unconventional events. We have 3 acres that are planted each year. We raise different type of chickens, Guineas, Rabbits and goats. I can hunt and fish to supplement what I have on hand. I have all manner of hand tools. Handsaws,bow saws,wood planes,draw knives,brace and bits,axes,shovels,non electric soldering irons,sledges and wedges. I could go on with the list. I am not saying that everyone needs these types of equipment! I have been collecting and planning 23 years long. I was fortunate to be raised by a grandma that canned and passed down a knowledge of home remedies and a grandpa that plowed his land with a mule and plow and made his own tools and handles and passed down a love of the land. I was raised poorer than dirt money wise. But I consider myself the richest person in the world today for the knowledge that was passed down to me. I owe the values and possessions I have today to these 2 wonderful folks they raised me right and the Marine Corps polished the rough edges.

I could go on and on! If there is anyone that has any questions Pm me and I will answer them if I can. If I can't I will find the resources on the net that can. The only stupid question is the one you don't ask! A WORD OF WARNING! IF YOU ARE THE TYPE THAT CANNOT WAIT FOR THE THE SHTF SO YOU CAN BEGIN LOOTING,RAPING OR PILLAGING DO NOT PM ME YOU WILL BE IGNORED!

Semper Fi !
Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It is day one of month one of my life as a survivor. What do I do now?

Sit down and don’t panic is number 1. Determine how much you can spend this month. We aren’t going into debt. We want to be realistic in our plans. For our purposes we are going to say we have between $100 and $200 to spend on getting ready.

Where do you start? You know how much you can spend so you have to determine where you are going to put the money this month. Build your plan. Take into consideration the following areas and do not think they are in priority order. These are just areas we have to work with.

Second thing we are doing is making a Rough Draft Plan. It is a rough draft because it is going to change. You have to keep flexible or you will go crazy.

Is the plan only for you or do you have family or friends included?

Do you plan to stay in place or do you plan to have an alternate site or sites in mind?

Do you have transportation and will it work to get you out?

Can you defend yourself?

Can you blend in?

What kind of disasters do you face in the area you live in? If it is California it could be earthquakes as well as the whole world coming to an end as we know it. It could be Hurricane like the Gulf Coast.

Most people in a panic will run. They just run and many times have no idea of where they are going or what to do when they get there. One of the things we saw in the Dallas area from Hurricane IKE was some people had planned ahead so much they had travel trailers set up with their kits and drove together up to RV parks they had called to establish a base till they could go home.

If you plan to leave you need maps and you can get many free from State you live in. In major Metro areas like NY or Chicago or LA or Dallas you need local maps too. Mark up you maps with highlighters showing alternate routes out of town from where you live and where you work. If you have people (Children) to pick up, how are you going to get them? Mark your map and attach contact information to them.

Use FEMA’s Contact sheets to work up your plan. I am not crazy about FEMA but they do have some good ideas like the contact cards. Use every resource you can.

In the first month build up your library of information. Put it in print form as well as on disk. Find books free online like Cresson Kearney’s work on Nuclear War Survival.

Food: buy what you eat. Remember that when you have food in your pantry you want to rotate out the oldest products so buy what you eat. Build up your 72 hour kit first. This is everything you and your family needs for the first three days. Food, Water, Shelter, clothes, Light, heat, cooking supplies, Radios, Communications, Maps, Protection, money or barter materials, tools (Includes multipurpose knives/tools) Transportation, for just a few.

Once you have the first 72 hours covered you have met a goal. It is just like going to school. You have points that you know you have reached a certain level and you have so much more to go. Have steps you can achieve. One of your biggest enemies is fear and frustration. When you reach goals it gives you hope. Set up plans with levels to work toward.

72 hour kit: Remember this is your first line kit. You will expand on this in the next steps. Don’t try to get too big too quick. This is the basics to start.

Food for three days. Can be canned food, freeze dried, whatever you eat. Main thing is make it simple to prepare.

Water for three days. Best way to go is to get containers and fill them from your tap. Two liter soda water bottles, 5 gallon containers from walmart, whatever works for you. Each person should have at least one gallon per day set aside. Later you can add water filters. Rotate water every three months.

Clothing and shoes (should be comfortable and set for climate) Include rain gear.

Sleeping stuff. Bags, blankets, sheets, etc. Use what you have at first. Then you can go to bags and systems.

Light, heat and cooking stuff. Candles, flashlights, batteries, Solar and crank operated, oil lamps and oil, single burner propane burner and small propane bottles. Matches, lighters, something to start fire. Don’t forget to have something to put out fire as well. Each of our vehicles has a fire extinguisher in it. Don’t forget a manual can opener. Swiss Army knife is great because they have them on the knife.

Contact information for each person. IDs, money, phone numbers, health care info. Places to meet if separated.


Whistle, mirror, compass, knife or multipurpose tool, Clear tubing to use as siphon, sanitary supplies (Soap, toilet paper, sanitizer, toothpaste and brush)

First aid kit (Check with folks like DocYoung on this one.) Nothing fancy to start. Next month or month after go for bigger and better. Don’t forget prescriptions and eye glasses.

Keep you vehicles up to date maintenance wise. Have extra fuel on hand for them. Know where you are going if you plan to leave. Have multiple routes laid out to avoid tie ups on major roads.

Personal protection. I know a lot of people will say this is first. Money may big issue for some and in other areas you may be limited by the law as to what you can have. If you can get a Concealed handgun permit. For a first gun stick with the basics again. A 22LR hand gun or small rifle is fine. Ammo is still a lot less expensive than higher calibers. It is also a gun that many people have from their childhood. Use what you have.

This does not cover all you need but it is a place to get started. Use the posts here to see what others have to say.

In coming months we can talk about more advanced kits and always be willing to revise your plans. Keep your plan up to
 

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Barrett, a great topic & question; probably most members could write 20 pages of good ideas off the top of their heads.
So lets start with the beginning and keep it short, considering your inquiring minds are new at "Survival Preparation"

1. Survival is a mind set not a shopping list. Let it be a positive endeavor ; not a task in preparing for a SHTF scenario.
2. If family is involved, make it a family affair, each member gets a topic to research, each member can become the family "specialist" on a vital survival topic, makes everyone feel important on this issue; they will be more willing to participate; weekly meetings to share and teach their topics.
3. Learn their immediate geography; water sources, food stores, hardware stores, hospitals, public or government buildings commonly used as EVAC shelters.
4. Draw ideas from this website and others, a wealth of knowledge.
5. Most of what they need to "Survive" is already in their home. Discover & organize these resources before pulling the wallet out.
6. Spend the minimun, barter where you can, looking at 15 cases of MRE'S stacked in the garage (at $69.00 a case) and no money to entertain a night at the movies, family dinner out, can zap the fun out of this endeavor. :(
7. Before bringing firearms into the family, study this issue and understand the responsibility.

After they have a handle on the above, let the experts on this site guide them to the next level.

Bubba1
 

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I just joined this group about a week ago. And I thought I'm not very prepared. The biggest thing I have learned is that I've been preparing all of my life. I am not helpless. Thanks to having 3 sons and them loving camping we have a lot of camping type items. I am learning through being in this group that it isn't about walking away from my house and taking nothing. There are medical supplies, food, utensils, garden tools - all kinds of things right here in my home. I bought my 1st gun last week - I'll learn to operate it and not be afraid of it. What I'm trying to say is THANK YOU. This group is giving me the courage to think outside the box - what can be improvised, what can have multiple uses, what can I take from where I am now to use if I need to flee. I'm very happy I found this group and that so many of you are willing to share your knowledge. Next thing I want to do is attend a get to gather. That would be awesome. From my mom I learned in times of plenty to put back in case of an emergency, which for us usually meant bad weather and daddy not working. This stockpiling I'm trying to do now is just that multiplied. And yes, newbies do make mistakes. I thought I was a smart when I ordered boxes of 4 oz. packets of water. Now, I'm trying to figure out how I'm going to carry all that weight! In hindsight I think I should have spent that money on buying a filtration system. Would have cost about the same and would have lasted a lot longer. Live and learn!!!
 

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Take a basic pistol class and a personal defense / home protection class also. That will give you some belief in your skills and train you "how to think / respond" when you really need it.

Then there is a lot of great advice on this post, I say start with what you can as only you know what you can afford.

Try to get the best equipment you can afford always... But alway work towards a goal...


Great post GB... :thumb:
 

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Bubba, you are so right. Here is what my family has. One son (who is also in this group) has fantastic knowledge about guns/ammo. Another son is very smart with his hands ie. fixing and improvizing and is working on the electric/solar/generator type thing. My 3rd son is concentrating on growing food and what we would need to keep us alive after all these supplies are gone. My husband contributes the wallet and keeps us all in line. I work on logistics, budget, keeping up with supplies - a manager type thing. My son's fiancee is a medical professional so she brings medical knowledge. We all contribute something and we work together.

And what you suggest about letting the experts guide you is right on the money also. Right now I'm wondering if a GPS is a good idea. Frankly I don't even know exactly what it is but there seems to be a lot of buzz about it. If I had read through the messages 3 months ago I wouldn't be sitting here wondering how I'm going to transport 250 packets of water!!!! :eek:)
 

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Thank you, Gunner/Fisherman. I am signed up to take a class in self defense and I want to do what Grinnan Barrett (that's so cute) suggested - get a concealed weapons permit. I have been around guns for a long time with a husband who is retired military and a son who is a gun enthusiast. But, I have never had a personal gun - well, I did shoot one, one time years ago. That thing (the gun) is locked away and it won't be out of the lock until I go to class and learn what I am doing - that I promise you.
 

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sherrieallen You are welcome... Your husband ex mil I know he knows as I am ex also... I worked with my wife many times but she also took a few classes including, How not to be victim which I think she really learned from.

She will be getting her permit soon, better safe then sorry... Good Luck... :thumb:
 

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With all these things brought up, I was going thru my ammo box tonight and realized that I had put alot of stuff in the ammo box that (was not ammo). I thought I had plenty until I took a look at it. Buy ammo before they tax the hell out of it. Food and ammo for all nubies. You can trade for the rest.
 

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I started with food and water going for the idea of having a 3 day supply then a one week supply of food and water. I'm not to sure where we are at now maybe two weeks.

I picked up a 30-06 and a .22 LR for both hunting and practice. I'm working on the food for the rest of the year and getting my aim with the guns better.

Next year it will be a Mossberg 500 and a Bow. The 500 as a home defense weapon and the bow for the long term hunting. The range in my area isn't cleared for either so I'm waiting till I move or I'm closer to moving.

The biggest thing that helped with me is making a list about what type of situation my area is likely to have.

Social unrest in my area isn't a big thing I live in the only low income building in my area. Everyone else around here has $300,000 to $1 Million homes so that's not a worry for me and crime is really low. we've had one hurricane in memory. But Ice and snow are really concerns so power outages and how to handle them.

I prep for the long term are at least that's the plan right now we looked at the most likely scenario and made the prep for that our focus so food/water till the government should show up then a bug out plan if needed. Now we are looking at building a life away from the city that still involves working and such.

Still food and a weapon equally balance as far as I'm concerned. Course I'm also working on getting totally out a debt to. I'm trying to balance all three as money will allow. But just a little extra in the food goes a log way to making me fell better and having at least one gun too. I live in no gun (yeah right) Canada but I do know kids that have them in bad areas.

But for us the list really helped there is no reason to be prepping for a twister if power outages during the winter and loss of heat are more likely. :)
 

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What I've done in addition to many of the already excellent suggestions is to think of how I would do everyday things. How would I boil water? How would I cook? Wash dishes or clothes? How would I take care of bodily functions, including but not limited to bathing?

The difference between what I want for preparations and what I can afford is...well, big. That's where I've had to get creative. I found a big clothesline dryer [the umbrella fold up kind] via Freecycle. We bought a woodstove for $40 at a garage sale to heat the workshop. I got a big 18 gallon plastic tub and a brand-new toilet plunger; toilet plunger plus a long screw-in handle equals a means of doing laundry. Everyone finds their own method and routine for preparing, and what works for one person may not work for someone else, but the first step is to take the first step and start.
 

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depending on what SHTF and your location are you in the city? country?


1st i would get a weapon and some ammo, for the city 1st i would get a pistol for easy concealed carry its hard to go to stores (unless it is a madmax their will be stores)and carry a bag with a rifle with you not to mention how funny you will look with a rifle. then id get a 12ga pump for the home.
in the country, 1st id get a 12ga pump for hunting and for home def. then a pistol for personnel carry. then later after you have stocked up other stuff and are beginning to feel a bit safer/better you can get a rifle

why i say get a weapon 1st? is bottomline it is survival if your not even 1/2 rdy your going to have to TAKE what you need and at the same time stay alive, and stop ppl from takeing what you do have.i know its a hard thought, but if TSHTF really bad life will be hard no room for the weak

here is a must read for any1 starting out. print it out and give it to your friend.its for an economic STHF but its food for thought

http://www.frugalsquirrels.com/cgi-bin/ubb/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=49;t=000074;p=0
 
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