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The Power of III
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Interesting - guess we'll find out where soon enough:

From: Recombinomics
August 12, 2009

Link:
http://www.recombinomics.com/News/08120901/H274Y_More.html

Excerpt:
Charles Penn, a scientist with the Geneva-based agency, says the WHO has also been alerted informally to the discovery of a small number of other Tamiflu-resistant viruses but he won't say where they were found.

The above comments describe additional cases of Tamiflu resistance (H274Y) but provide no detail on the circumstances or locations. Who has acknowledged the resistance that was evident in the sequences released from Singapore and Hunan, China, as well as the examples previously described in Denmark, Canada, Hong Kong, and Japan (3 times). However, the number and location of additional cases and circumstances remains unclear.

Media reports have described H274Y in Thailand, but it remains unclear how many cases were found. In addition, there were reports of resistance along the Texas / Mexican border, but those reports were denied. However, the denial only addressed the cited locations. There was no statement that the rumored cases were false. The media report was quite detailed about the cases (at least two), which raised concerns that the resistance was widespread, because multiple cases were reported in the same general area.
 

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AKA The Dragon
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Yes it seems it is becoming more widespread and may continue to do so in countries such as Africa, India, the Middle East area, Central asia that are still in the early stages of the declared pandemic.

There hasn't been any more information on resistance to Relenza which was discovered in Australia not so long ago.

The lack of information about a number of issues on this topic maybe of concern too.
 
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AKA The Dragon
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H1N1 virus turning Tamiflu-resistant
Kounteya Sinha, TNN 31 August 2009, 08:15am IST

An increasing number of countries, including some in Asia, are now reporting Tamiflu resistant H1N1 virus. The worrying development,
according to WHO, has seen 12 countries including China and Singapore. India has not reported the mutation in the virus so far.

The changes in the virus reported in samples are making these strains of swine flu resistant to oseltamivir or Tamiflu - the antiviral of choice globally. Such cases have also been found in Japan, US, Hong Kong, Denmark and Canada.
Changes in the virus are also being tracked closely as scientists are concerned that new strains may make the vaccines being developed at a feverish pace infructuous. As of now, WHO fears Tamiflu resistance may be more widespread than officially reported
.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...amiflu-resistant-H1N1/articleshow/4952430.cms
 

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AKA The Dragon
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Friday, September 4, 2009
Holland's victim dies from Tamiflu-resistant H1N1 virus


20 August, the World Health Organization (WHO) states that 31% of influenza A/H1N1 isolates from 16 countries conducted last test H274Y mutation, which confers resistance to oseltamivir. Resistance levels range from 100% (10 of 10 isolates), Australia 13% (4 of 32 isolates) in Chile.

The emergence of oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 virus was first observed in Norway in January and since then researchers have found that the virus in 35 countries, including the United States and Canada.

Dissemination of oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 virus was puzzled experts because it is not clearly linked to treatment with drugs.
http://swine-flu-symptoms-informations.blogspot.com/2009/09/hollands-victim-dies-from-tamiflu.html
 
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They won't release the number until they know more about it.

Releasing the info will freak people...like what happened with the initial Swine Flu outbreak. Again catch 22 for the health officials. Maybe we'll get another leaked CDC directors brief. :D:
 

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In my opinion they simply do not have enough Tamiflu to offer everyone as there has been a shortage on the drug for a long time now and it is not an easy drug to produce. Tamiflu has an expiration date just like any other medicine, and the goverment has been stockpiling it for years and the stockpile was nearing the expiration date or past it and suddenly they decide to extend the expiration date on the stockpile Tamiflu! Now how does that work? So are we seeing true Tamiflu resistent strains OR are we seeing Tamiflu that is not working as it's effectiveness is not as strong as it would be within a year or so that that it was manufactured? They know they can't get enough Tamiflu fast enough. Now they are changing the story of which anti viral is effective and suddenly it's not Tamiflu although they still stand by Relenza. They already knew Rimantadine was NOT effective but now change their minds?

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601103&sid=akVwLvrrEKEA&refer=us
 

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Here, read this link from the FDA and look at how and why they extended expiration date on Tamiflu. A manufacturer makes and tests a drug and puts an expiration date on it for effectiveness and suddenly they can just extend it? They know they cannot get enough of Tamiflu for everyone they THINK will need it at this point so now you run the risk of getting Tamiflu that is past it's useful shelf life so are there more cases of Tamiflu resistent H1N1 or is the Tamiflu given too old to be effective? That's the question I would like answered, what was the TRUE expiration date on the drug that they claim did not work?

http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/PublicHealthFocus/ucm154962.htm
 

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In my opinion they simply do not have enough Tamiflu to offer everyone as there has been a shortage on the drug for a long time now and it is not an easy drug to produce. Tamiflu has an expiration date just like any other medicine, and the goverment has been stockpiling it for years and the stockpile was nearing the expiration date or past it and suddenly they decide to extend the expiration date on the stockpile Tamiflu! Now how does that work? So are we seeing true Tamiflu resistent strains OR are we seeing Tamiflu that is not working as it's effectiveness is not as strong as it would be within a year or so that that it was manufactured? They know they can't get enough Tamiflu fast enough. Now they are changing the story of which anti viral is effective and suddenly it's not Tamiflu although they still stand by Relenza. They already knew Rimantadine was NOT effective but now change their minds?

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601103&sid=akVwLvrrEKEA&refer=us
Its evolution. 2009 H1N1 Swine flu wouldn't be here if it wasn't so evolutionary fit to spread like it does. And there was already a Tamiflu resistant seasonal flu virus in the southern hemisphere. Obviously there are slight mutations going on exchanging genes with this new one picking up the resistant gene. So then the Tamiflu susceptible viruses will get killed off as people take Tamiflu and the Tamiflu resistant ones will continue to produce.

The more people get the flu the more chances for mutation. Eventually it will exchange genes with someone who has the deadlier H5N1 bird flu. Its all a math game...
 

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Yes, a virus can always mutate that is true however this problem with Tamiflu manufacturing has been going on a long time and as many goverments had stockpiled this drug for several years we do not know the effectiveness of the drugs given in
Southern Hemisphere or other areas either as Tamiflu is sold to goverments worldwide. We've seen increasing suggested restrictions on who should be prescribed Tamiflu over the past months and that's because there's not enough of the drug for everyone who may need it. This is not including for children as the liquid form has been out of stock in most pharmacies for months now and capsules are becoming very hard to get. Worse case scenario as you mentioned is if this H1N1 mutates with Avian or another strain but so far that is not happening. There is a reason they stockpile Tamiflu, it is the first line of defense in the known pandemic virus strains. It is difficult for people to inhale relenza if they have upper respiratory distress so Tamiflu is preferred. Time will tell of course but I can see Tamiflu becoming harder to obtain as each day passes.
 

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Besides questionable effectiveness IF given after expiration date, using only 1/2 the dosage that was required by the manufacturer to be effective for treating the virus is also suspect when they claim Tamiflu resistence.

Reddy told The Associated Press that it wasn't certain why the 13 patients developed the resistance while taking the drug, but that there was an indication that many were taking only half a dose.

That lower dose is what is given to people to prevent them catching the disease, said Reddy. "If they were actually infected with the virus, the dosage of the drug may have been too low."


http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090907/ap_on_bi_ge/eu_switzerland_roche_tamiflu_3
 
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