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Geronimo!
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We just restocked on several flavors of Miracle-Gro ... the big tins, which is the way I like to store it. Their tomato plant mix is hard to beat.

We also stock the heck out of 10-10-10 and some others but I always buy three or four 40 pound bags of 10-10-10 each season and try to rotate what I have leftover each year.

Living with the chicken farms, we have no shortage of natural high nitrogen fertilizer ... but you gotta let the stuff cook down for a year or so before putting it around plants or it will burn them slap up. It makes excellent mix for the compost pile though. You can almost cook on the stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
yeah compost would be optimal but really no spot for it plus the ten pound box was bent up and on clearance for 8$.....score......I have just had such good luck with using it I thought it would be nice to have if my life depended on a crop. and I also posted as an idea for a helper as some may not have the level of gardening experience needed to survive you almost cant screw up if you use miracle grow
 

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I deal in lead
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Miracle Grow is chemicals for your plants...especially the ones your gonna consume!! Go ORGANIC if your gonna store soil or compost. Start composting your food scraps and waste. Newspapers,coffee grinds,banana peels,anything but meats and cheeses. Then you have your own soil thats thriving with microorganisms and beneficial bacteria. Veggies are guaranteed to taste better too!!!!
 

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Miracle Grow is chemicals for your plants...especially the ones your gonna consume!! Go ORGANIC if your gonna store soil or compost. Start composting your food scraps and waste. Newspapers,coffee grinds,banana peels,anything but meats and cheeses. Then you have your own soil thats thriving with microorganisms and beneficial bacteria. Veggies are guaranteed to taste better too!!!!
Plants thrive on some chemicals, particularly those in Miracle Grow.

The word "chemicals" doesn't mean anything useful. Everything is a chemical. Water is a chemical. And without it, plants wouldn't be very happy.

And Miracle Gro could help some people overcome the huge learning curve involved with gardening. By being able to produce more from what they grow, it could help compensate for a number of mistakes.
 

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Armchair Prepper
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I imagine that a container of miracle grow would be pretty helpful to someone depending on a garden for post-SHTF food.

If you've got space, composting is a pretty good renewable resource.

It's sort of like growing hybrid veggies. I currently grow both open pollinated and hybrids. For a lot of stuff, the hybrid produces more food. I suspect that during the first years, I'd continue using both and transitioning to all open pollinated as I used up the hybrids.

I've been researching terra preta soil for a while.
 

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10-10-10 is $600 a ton spread on your hay fields in my are right now.better grab a bag or two while ya can and the price gets higher.

all of us need a compost pile,a few bags of ferltizer and anything else we can use to our advantage.

for your info...you can get a bag of pure eureua(spelling?)....46-0-0 and top dress your pasture.a 50# bag does one acre.not sure waht the price is this year.
 

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Geronimo!
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for your info...you can get a bag of pure eureua(spelling?)....46-0-0 and top dress your pasture.a 50# bag does one acre.not sure waht the price is this year.
We spread chicken manure on the hay fields around here and it works wonders.

I think you are meaning Urea nitrogen fertilizer perhaps? It's tough to come by because it is the #1 catalyst component for diesel bombs like the one used in Oklahoma City. When you can find it, you gotta sign for it around here and you are limited to X number of bags depending upon availability.
 
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We spread chicken manure on the hay fields around here and it works wonders.

I think you are meaning Urea nitrogen fertilizer perhaps? It's tough to come by because it is the #1 catalyst component for diesel bombs like the one used in Oklahoma City. When you can find it, you gotta sign for it around here and you are limited to X number of bags depending upon availability.
yep..thats the one...a bag real does wonders for fields and pastures.i added a bag on my milo field last year.it really helped it.
 

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Geronimo!
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yep..thats the one...a bag real does wonders for fields and pastures.i added a bag on my milo field last year.it really helped it.
You know, we used to have 100s of 1000s of acres of milo around here - where it went I do not know. Soybeans I guess, and cotton and grapes and peaches.

Milo is a good crop to grow. What do you do with yours?

You've gotta be in the South somewhere. You know slaves brought the crop with them from Africa. I remember when I was a kid there were dozens of local producers of sorghum molasses down here - but you hardly ever see it anymore.

I may have to plant a little quarter acre of it and see how I do with it. It's great for making couscous and sorghum bread. Wow, things slip away from us without even realizing it some times. I've eaten sorghum floured pancakes with sorghum molasses so many times as a kid ...
 

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You know, we used to have 100s of 1000s of acres of milo around here - where it went I do not know. Soybeans I guess, and cotton and grapes and peaches.

Milo is a good crop to grow. What do you do with yours?

You've gotta be in the South somewhere. You know slaves brought the crop with them from Africa. I remember when I was a kid there were dozens of local producers of sorghum molasses down here - but you hardly ever see it anymore.

I may have to plant a little quarter acre of it and see how I do with it. It's great for making couscous and sorghum bread. Wow, things slip away from us without even realizing it some times. I've eaten sorghum floured pancakes with sorghum molasses so many times as a kid ...
mostly for wildlife.since it been so hot and dry here i have changed my plans on things to plant.this year i will do both sweet sorghum and milo.heres a few pics of my planting in the mtns.








 

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Seeker of Truth
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This thread has some great ideas

Here are some things I use and why.
I use a mixture of donkey manure, chicken, peafowl, and compost. I usually mix it with scrap hay and let it sit in mounds for a year. When I dig in to use it I usually find grubs (which my fish love) and a lot of good organic fertilizer.
I try to save that for edibles and use Miracle Grow for my defensive (thorny) plants around perimeters such as Pyracantha, Blackberry, Raspberry, Quince, Barberry, Roses, Cacti, Bougainvillea in a MILD climate, Yucca, Pampas Grass, Chinese Holly, and Mexican Fan Palms (great for height). These are also great for attracting bees & wildlife, too. These plants are good in situations when local restrictions don't allow fences. Treading through some of these is not pleasant, but generally serve as deterrents rather than full scale obstacles.
*As a "Defensive Note"... If you want to "beef" them up, wait until the plants get filled out then run a coil of barbed wire through the bush. It's not obvious, until someone gets tangled in it. You can even add old cow bells on it for an audible warning that "someone's crossed the line.":D:
 

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just got done sealing 10# of miracle grow in mylar ....thoughts? this stuff makes my garden grow so well if shtf I wanna have some for sure
I think you would be better off with a compost bin.

Lowes sales some plastic compost bins that have a door in the bottom. All you do is throw the stuff in the top, and scoop the compost out of the bottom door.

Fertilizer does not go very far to start with. I can use a 50 poind bag of 13-13-13 in just a few rows of squash.
 

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Geronimo!
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I think it all depends on the soil type. Where there is clay, it seems fertilizer absorbs and it takes less. Where there is rock and sand, not so much.

We have nothing but sand so we use a lot of old hay - stuff in the big rolls that rotted, to add some moisture holding ability to the soil but there is usually a lot of grass that grows from it if not properly composted-down first. That's where the chicken manure comes in handy. Nothing like a little dirt, a lot of hay and some chicken manure to make for good compost for sandy soil. The chicken manure is mixed in with wood shavings from the shaving mill around here - they cover the floors of their houses with it before putting the new chickens in every nine weeks. It comes out raunchy but it sure does make good stuff for the gardens.
 
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