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Hi....this being a Prepper site I certainly assume you present these items for survival. What is the estimated shelf life of some of these items. Ifthey need butter I bought powdered butter from Auguson Foods..
Good morning.
I would consider these to be short term, a couple of years per say.
Only the yellow rice calls for butter or olive oil.
I posted them for those just looking for ideas to get their pantry going.
The ease of just adding water was the attraction. The taste was the recommendation.
To note- I cant stand the little diced potatoes that come inmost soup cans. The potato soups are fantastic, especially the Idahoan brand.

Hope this helps.
 

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Good for you, I couldn't care less about your opinion.
If you thought I posted because I wanted you to appreciate my post then you don't know me at all. I post for all the others who read this board.

My post was to encourage others take the time to learn a "Top 3" survival skill. Namely real cooking.

If pets had hands even they could boil water. Boiling water isn't cooking. Real cooking the the preliminary training to brew, pickle, ferment, pressure can, smoke, dehydrate, freeze dry, cure, and garden.

If you wish to ignore quality survival information, then be my guest. But I'm not posting for your benefit.
 
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If you thought I posted because I wanted you to appreciate my post then you don't know me at all. I post for all the others who read this board.

My post was to encourage others take the time to learn a "Top 3" survival skill. Namely real cooking.

If pets had hands even they could boil water. Boiling water isn't cooking. Real cooking the the preliminary training to brew, pickle, ferment, pressure can, smoke, dehydrate, freeze dry, cure, and garden.

If you wish to ignore quality survival information, then be my guest. But I'm not posting for your benefit.
When it comes to actual facts on most subjects, you are one of the best and I appreciate your knowledge and know how. However when you start making assumptions and rattling on about how other people don't meet your measuring sticks, it rubs everyone the wrong way. Which is pretty apparent from the number of negative comments you get when you start interjecting your personal judgement.

When you have been prepping forever, you forget that a lot of people (even "preppers")are doing good to have 2 to 3 months of food on hand. So having a 5 to 20 year shelf life is really irrelevant if they will just use what is in their pantry. I'm pretty sure that the OP was referring to that audience.
 

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......it rubs everyone the wrong way.
1) got a mouse in your pocket or do you assume you can speak for everyone else?

2) I suppose I'll have to repeat myself.

If you thought I posted because I wanted you to appreciate my post then you don't know me at all.
 

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Bass,
I am so sorry I offended you. When your 2-3 mos of pantry food runs out, I should have assumed you have the hens and cows/goats to keep refilling your supplies. I should have assumed you have the preps and skills to cook if the power goes out and stays out. I should have assumed you have the 18th C skills to live well if everything goes to crap. I should have assumed you have the equipment and skills to make everything you need/want if stores do not have them. I should have assumed you can train a horse to plow a field, train a cow to not kick you in the head, train your dogs to hunt and guard and herd. I should have assumed you have spinning wheels, looms and sewing equipment to refresh your clothing for years. I should have assumed you can do it all. Not everybody knows the basics of meal planning or cooking. Not everyone knows how to bake bread on a hot rock.

liebrecht
 

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Geesh, several posts on this thread needs a bit of this remedy. Please apply this first-aid cream where needed, and let's carry on with the fine topic of fast emergency foods that can be tossed into a bug out bag.

Or else I will have to start editing posts to get this thread back on track.
 

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Hi guys.
These are some of my tried and loved “add water only” favorites.


I agree, they definitely have a place in my pantry. I just added a year supply of the Pioneer Beef Gravy. For quick hamburger/salisbury steak with gravy its the best mix I’ve found. Its a little thin so I add a teaspoon of corn starch. Going to try the Au Jus with pot roast and pressure cooked round steak.

I make homemade gravy’s but the instant beef is just so convenient. If you’re out camping its an easy way to improve a meal.
342854
 

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I fixed your post so the quote was separate from your post.
 

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Kelley,
You forgot hot cocoa<smile>. Life is always better with chocolate. You can also zip up a bunch of "mixes" for things and store them yourself. I am not an "add water" much kinda gal as I realllly like milk and eggs and butter<smile>. But I do have hens and am looking for a new cow so that is my life, my choices. I do like keeping the Idahoan potatoes around for The Kid as teens eat everything in the house and he can zip up a bag between meals/snacks/just to graze.

liebrecht
You know, it's kinda funny. I'm not normally big into sweet foods. But alas, the current situation has put us back into eating quite a bit out of our storage. I had always discounted how important cocoa powder was. I mean I stored it, but I didn't really have any major plans for it....Until now.

I find we're using quite a bit of it with oats, grits and cream of wheat to make breakfasts.

It's cheap. Even if you don't have actial plans for it, store it anyway. Trust me, it will come in handy in a pinch.
 

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You know, it's kinda funny. I'm not normally big into sweet foods. But alas, the current situation has put us back into eating quite a bit out of our storage. I had always discounted how important cocoa powder was. I mean I stored it, but I didn't really have any major plans for it....Until now.

I find we:re using quite a bit of it with oats, grits and cream of wheat to make breakfasts.

It's cheap. Even if you don't have actial plans for it, store it anyway. Trust me, it will come in handy in a pinch.
I don't think I've ever seen plain cocoa powder go bad, even without LTS packaging. I'm sure it has some kind of limit, but unsweetened cocoa powder seems very durable on its own. A bit of sugar and something milk-ish and you change the flavor of food completely. It has its own weird phyto-nutrition benefits too. It does seem to interfere with calcium absorption and is a stimulant you may not want, but otherwise seems relatively nutritious.

All in all, with its robust shelf life, it's likely a net nutritional positive on the LTS storage shelf. It's more than just flavoring.

As for sweets, it doesn't have to be. As with mole, it adds a depth to dark meaty sauces. It was the Euros who added sweet to cocoa. It went untold centuries as a savory food flavoring before Euros showed up.
 

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Yep.....cocoa powder has a lot of uses. I make a mix so Kid can add water and have a mug. Tho.....it has been a PITA to find. I shopped online for years before it was cool as we have limited stores here and I do not like to tote all the heavy stuff I need. As normal, went to WM.com and cocoa was pick up only. I asked a pal who goes weekly if he would snag it for me and......he ended up at 10 different WMs and NONE. It does seem to be back in stock but I have my stash now so haven't looked lately. I admit I store premade mixes of some things, usually stuff that is cheaper on sale than to make from scratch. But I am also a fan of INGREDIENTS so no limits on what I can make when I feel like it. I have cocoa powder that is years old ( pal got me special ones for Christmas one year) that are just stored in mason jars and are fine. When you make choc chip choco marshmallows and dust them with black cocoa and confectioners sugar.....sinful<smile>. Added to a cuppa hot cocoa at the end of a long cold day.....you will need some alone time<smile>.

liebrecht
 

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Not exactly Add Water but....I had a recipe for a whole wheat bread using brown sugar and beer as leavening. I used to make it in a cast iron spider when I was doing reenactments but have forgotten the proportions. No baking powder or soda.....it made a heavy bread that you could add apples/nuts/ stuff to and was quite good with meat or cheese. Every recipe I am finding has added leavening. Any ideas? I am going to mess with this in the next few days but if I can save some time and trouble.... Thanks.

liebrecht
 

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Not exactly Add Water but....I had a recipe for a whole wheat bread using brown sugar and beer as leavening. I used to make it in a cast iron spider when I was doing reenactments but have forgotten the proportions. No baking powder or soda.....it made a heavy bread that you could add apples/nuts/ stuff to and was quite good with meat or cheese. Every recipe I am finding has added leavening. Any ideas? I am going to mess with this in the next few days but if I can save some time and trouble.... Thanks.

liebrecht
Leavening options? It is quite a list to choose from.

Food based:
Yeast
Sourdough
Buttermilk
Kefir whey
Yogurt
Unpasteurized beer
Unpasteurized ginger beer
Egg whites (whipped to hold air)
Club soda
Triggers: vinegar, lemon juice, molasses, sour cream
Creaming (vigorously mixing sugar crystals with a solid fat to hold air)
Steam trapping (puff pastry for example)

Chemical:
Sodium bicarbonate + acid trigger
Potassium carbonate + acid trigger
Baker's ammonia (hartshorn) (restricted to low rise crisp baked goods)
Chemical triggers: cream of tartar, monocalcium phosphate, sodium aluminum pyrophosphate, sodium aluminium sulfate, dimagnesium phosphate, or disodium pyrophosphate.
(The last 4 are not instant triggers, but react at different times due to heating for a controlled gas release)

My apologies for actually making your question even harder with all the detail. Perhaps molasses would be key to triggering the yeast in your unpasteurized beer.
 
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Or maybe nobody " taught" them how to cook from scratch AND save time. Double up on cooking, ....
ON THE OTHER HAND - I was brought up that serving leftovers was low class and a sign of a lazy/poorly organized cook. Cook each meal and eat it ALL.

Proper qty prepared by the cook means that nothing is left after the meal and no fatties from overfeeding.
 

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ON THE OTHER HAND - I was brought up that serving leftovers was low class and a sign of a lazy/poorly organized cook. Cook each meal and eat it ALL.

Proper qty prepared by the cook means that nothing is left after the meal and no fatties from overfeeding.
Yet one of the very best time savers is to cook large batches and freeze leftovers in individual servings. Pretty soon you have a bunch of homemade "tv dinners" ready to go when you want them. Once you've been at it a while and have a good variety put away, you can get by with cooking once a week, other than salads or something like that.
 

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ON THE OTHER HAND - I was brought up that serving leftovers was low class and a sign of a lazy/poorly organized cook. Cook each meal and eat it ALL.

Proper qty prepared by the cook means that nothing is left after the meal and no fatties from overfeeding.
What national culture is that one?

Certainly not Asian, which typically uses dinner leftovers for breakfast. Certainly not northern European, which relied heavily on the perpetual soup concept. Certainly not the Italian or Spanish, who revel in the way most tomato based dishes taste even better the second time they are served. Certainly not American, where Thanksgiving leftovers are a national pastime. Certainly not Mexico, where dinner leftovers are commonly rolled into tacos for a man's work lunch the next day and the whole concept of refried beans was originally from the leftover dinner bean pot. Certainly not the Caribbean, where the whole idea of their spicy food was to cover up the taint of spoiled and leftover food. Chili, pizza, fried rice, paella, shepherd's pie.....meals where the idea of leftovers is part and parcel. It may be what you did at home, but it has little to do with any well established concept of culture, nationality, or etiquette.
 
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It also eliminates a great many foods such as roast beef, or even casseroles unless one has a large family to feed. Who makes a 2-4 serving pot of beans? It puts an end to barbecue, ham, etc. About the only kinds of cooking it seems like it would work with are things done in a skillet or on a grill, like many restaurants do.
 

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It also eliminates a great many foods such as roast beef, or even casseroles unless one has a large family to feed. Who makes a 2-4 serving pot of beans? It puts an end to barbecue, ham, etc. About the only kinds of cooking it seems like it would work with are things done in a skillet or on a grill, like many restaurants do.


Gonna be a few leftovers after this meal....
 
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