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Hi guys.
These are some of my tried and loved “add water only” favorites.
The yellow rice does call for butter/olive oil.
but just an idea.
the soups are fantastic and make big portions.
342460

just hoping to help someone who may be looking for ideas.
 

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Super Gassy Moderator
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Bear Creek soups are one of my favorites. Not by themselves, because they aren't much more than flavored starch. But they are sure great for adding stuff to. A few simple add ins and they become a real meal. And Idahoan potatoes are about the best of the dry that I've found.

The downside is that neither of those store well long term. Back in the 90s, Bear Creek actually sold their soups in #10 cans with O2 absorbers (the VERY best way to pack long term foods). They listed a 5 year shelf life on the label. I had bought dozens of each flavor. And sure enough, shortly after the 5 years were up, they began to lose quality fast. The tortilla soup didn't even make 5 years before the included tortilla chips were inedibly rancid and the smell permeated the soup so badly that I just tossed them all.
 

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Beer Truck Door Gunner
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Hi guys.
These are some of my tried and loved “add water only” favorites.
The yellow rice does call for butter/olive oil.
but just an idea.
the soups are fantastic and make big portions.
View attachment 342460
just hoping to help someone who may be looking for ideas.
If you read the labels and see fat listed in the ingredients then they do not last for long. Same goes for baking powder, like the Bisquick mix has.

You buy these rice, noodle, gravy, and batter mixes for immediate use, not for storage, because they weren't made to last long.

About the only thing in your picture worth storing for a while is the Vigo yellow rice.
 

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I actually have most of this in the pantry. I don't use them as LTS supplies, I just incorporate them into our meals.

I experimented with the potatoes you show and they hydrate surprisingly well in room temp water. Which if you don't mind eating cold potatoes makes it super easy in a power outage/emergency.
 

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Beer Truck Door Gunner
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I actually have most of this in the pantry. I don't use them as LTS supplies, I just incorporate them into our meals.

I experimented with the potatoes you show and they hydrate surprisingly well in room temp water. Which if you don't mind eating cold potatoes makes it super easy in a power outage/emergency.
It's all factory lab food to me. I'd rather cook stuff like that from whole fresh food or base ingredients. Cooking a real potato isn't exactly hard.

About the only time I make stuff like in the picture is when camping.
 

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CRAP CREEK SURVIVOR
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Hi guys.
These are some of my tried and loved “add water only” favorites.
The yellow rice does call for butter/olive oil.
but just an idea.
the soups are fantastic and make big portions.
View attachment 342460
just hoping to help someone who may be looking for ideas.
I make my own homemade versions of some of these items for camping, weather disasters, or other situations where time/fuel/power is nonexistent or in short supply. Although they don't have a super long shelf life, they sure are handy to have!
 

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Russians say.
only lazy people, young people, students and ... stupid foreigners cook food from semi-finished products, freeze-dried products and everything else.
😄 Sorry..
-----
of course, if you want to have food for survival, but not for everyday food, then you can buy it.
 

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The knorr pasta sides and potatoes arent bad. I like them when backpacking. I usually add pouch or canned chicken. I like to bring a couple eggs and some bacon for the first morning and I try to save a few pieces of bacon to chop up and add to the potatoes for the evening meal.
 

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Super Gassy Moderator
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The knorr pasta sides and potatoes arent bad. I like them when backpacking. I usually add pouch or canned chicken. I like to bring a couple eggs and some bacon for the first morning and I try to save a few pieces of bacon to chop up and add to the potatoes for the evening meal.
Precook that bacon and you can have bacon all throughout your trip. If it's cooked relatively dry and crisp, it's shelf stable. I love to take a big ziplock of it with me.
 

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Someone is always going to complain and say these "dont last long on the shelf and they cook from scratch" fact is life gets in the way of things some times and SHTF dosnt happen every day. Storing what you eat is pretty important and just adding water makes things easy.

I have eaten Knorr sides 5yrs past there expiration as a test.
 

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Off the leash
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We use the Spanish or Mexican rice versions of these with some canned chicken and other spices or seasonings. Really good out over a camp fire. They all make a nice quick, easy meal for when you're not feeling up to cooking a lot or aren't very hungry.

We've used the soups as something quick and easy to fix up for bible study and other events at our church too.
 

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Someone is always going to complain and say these "dont last long on the shelf and they cook from scratch" fact is life gets in the way of things some times and SHTF dosnt happen every day. Storing what you eat is pretty important and just adding water makes things easy.

I have eaten Knorr sides 5yrs past there expiration as a test.
Life for thousands of years did not have these factory made convenience foods. Sure, we had fast snacks but not like these packages. Therefore, these pouches are not a fact of life, but a lifestyle choice instead. You get busy because you let the outside world intrude on your time and take it for other things. People who scratch cook will all tell you that it takes longer and you have to make the time, taking it from some other modern activity that tries to suck you in. Amusements, playing helicopter parent, anything more than about 60 work hours, lost on the internet, all these things are choices. It's just for the first time in human history that actual cooking has become a choice, and so too many people opt to skip the cooking for the other optional choices.
 
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Life for thousands of years did not have these factory made convenience foods. Sure, we had fast snacks but not like these packages. Therefore, these pouches are not a fact of life, but a lifestyle choice instead. You get busy because you let the outside world intrude on your time and take it for other things. People who scratch cook will all tell you that it takes longer and you have to make the time, taking it from some other modern activity that tries to suck you in. Amusements, playing helicopter parent, anything more than about 60 work hours, lost on the internet, all these things are choices. It's just for the first time in human history that actual cooking has become a choice, and so too many people opt to skip the cooking for the other optional choices.
Thank you for the soapbox lecture. Are you constantly have issues with the way people want to prep because there not your way?

I actualy haven't stepped foot in a restaurant in over 11 months.
 

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You get busy because you let the outside world intrude on your time and take it for other things. People who scratch cook will all tell you that it takes longer and you have to make the time, taking it from some other modern activity that tries to suck you in. Amusements, playing helicopter parent, anything more than about 60 work hours, lost on the internet, all these things are choices. It's just for the first time in human history that actual cooking has become a choice, and so too many people opt to skip the cooking for the other optional choices.
Or maybe nobody " taught" them how to cook from scratch AND save time. Double up on cooking, making a menu plan and you can have lots of lovely things in a flash. Many things are cooked at 350o for an hour....so put 4 pans in the oven at once and have 4 dinners for the week ready in 1 hour instead of messing around doing it once a day. I just zipped up 2 roasting pans of stuffed cabbage rolls.....into the freezer they went and for about 1 1/2 work, making and cooking, I have 15 servings ready to go when I want them. 2 homemade pizza doughs are in the frige right now so it will take about 20 mins to have pizza on a plate. One is not required to cook each meal from scratch, one at a time. When I am in the mood for something, I make a big batch and toss more in the freezer so I have a grand selection of " homemade TV dinners". And " making time"...amazing how if you know how, you can easily double up on cooking as many appliances do not require you to watch them work. Just how it works for me.

liebrecht
 

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Or maybe nobody " taught" them how to cook from scratch AND save time. Double up on cooking, making a menu plan and you can have lots of lovely things in a flash. Many things are cooked at 350o for an hour....so put 4 pans in the oven at once and have 4 dinners for the week ready in 1 hour instead of messing around doing it once a day. I just zipped up 2 roasting pans of stuffed cabbage rolls.....into the freezer they went and for about 1 1/2 work, making and cooking, I have 15 servings ready to go when I want them. 2 homemade pizza doughs are in the frige right now so it will take about 20 mins to have pizza on a plate. One is not required to cook each meal from scratch, one at a time. When I am in the mood for something, I make a big batch and toss more in the freezer so I have a grand selection of " homemade TV dinners". And " making time"...amazing how if you know how, you can easily double up on cooking as many appliances do not require you to watch them work. Just how it works for me.

liebrecht
It took you 2 paragraphs to say that us ignoramuses need to learn to cook bigger batches.
 

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Kelley,
You forgot hot cocoa<smile>. Life is always better with chocolate. You can also zip up a bunch of "mixes" for things and store them yourself. I am not an "add water" much kinda gal as I realllly like milk and eggs and butter<smile>. But I do have hens and am looking for a new cow so that is my life, my choices. I do like keeping the Idahoan potatoes around for The Kid as teens eat everything in the house and he can zip up a bag between meals/snacks/just to graze.

liebrecht
 

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Hi guys.
These are some of my tried and loved “add water only” favorites.
The yellow rice does call for butter/olive oil.
but just an idea.
the soups are fantastic and make big portions.
View attachment 342460
just hoping to help someone who may be looking for ideas.
Hi....this being a Prepper site I certainly assume you present these items for survival. What is the estimated shelf life of some of these items. Ifthey need butter I bought powdered butter from Auguson Foods..
 
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