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Wild Edibles Expert
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Good site but I think some of his advice is off a bit.... there are two ways to process acorns, with or without high heat. That influences the final base product. Cold leaching does not cook the starch in the acorn so it can be used as a thickener in soups, stews, or as a binder in meatloaf and breads. Hot water leaching cooks the starch eliminating the binding capacity. Also, if the temperature is not kept constantly hot, finish to end, the starch will bind with the tannins and the mash will be forever bitter.
 

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Krazy Kitty
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Discussion Starter #3
Well this first batch I poured boiling water over it. It's been setting for about an hour. I think the next one I will add some sea salt and do it with cold water. This is my first try so we'll see how it comes out. After they're dried I'm thinking of making a coating for baked chicken breasts. Just need to figure out which spices to use. Maybe also have some kind of honey sauce too.
 

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Scarred for life...
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How many gallons does it take to make 6 pounds of nutmeat?

A friend of mine got his grand kids out in the yard to pick them up and he has something like 42 gallons...
 

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I have tried processing acorns before and found the full of mealy worms. On a yahoo wild edible list I asked if anyone else had this problem and everyone said yes. I was hoping to find someone who was gathering them without this problem so I could see what I was doing wrong.

What kind of oak trees do you gather from? Do you gather them from the forest floor, shake them loose from the tree, or are you brave enough to climb up and get them? I haven't been brave enough to try that yet.:eek::

I'm thinking in a survival situation I would process them mealy worms and all and just consider them extra protein, but right now I'd love to learn how to NOT have worms in them.

Thanks for any advice.

Tury
 

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Wild Edibles Expert
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10,167 Posts
Well this first batch I poured boiling water over it. It's been setting for about an hour. I think the next one I will add some sea salt and do it with cold water. This is my first try so we'll see how it comes out. After they're dried I'm thinking of making a coating for baked chicken breasts. Just need to figure out which spices to use. Maybe also have some kind of honey sauce too.
A one time application of boiling water is not the way to go... it is either cold all the way, or boiling all the way....
 

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Wild Edibles Expert
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10,167 Posts
I have tried processing acorns before and found the full of mealy worms. On a yahoo wild edible list I asked if anyone else had this problem and everyone said yes. I was hoping to find someone who was gathering them without this problem so I could see what I was doing wrong.

What kind of oak trees do you gather from? Do you gather them from the forest floor, shake them loose from the tree, or are you brave enough to climb up and get them? I haven't been brave enough to try that yet.:eek::

I'm thinking in a survival situation I would process them mealy worms and all and just consider them extra protein, but right now I'd love to learn how to NOT have worms in them.

Thanks for any advice.

Tury
They always have worms. That is a fact of acorns. You throw all the acorns in water and toss those that flat then go from there. You will lose about half of those you gather. Visit my website to learn more. Click on my bog above then put acorns in the search window.
 

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Krazy Kitty
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Discussion Starter #9
They always have worms. That is a fact of acorns. You throw all the acorns in water and toss those that flat then go from there. You will lose about half of those you gather. Visit my website to learn more. Click on my bog above then put acorns in the search window.
I don't know what type of oak we have. We waited till they stopped pinging off the roof and every metal surface around. I guess they're done dropping. We got four rotted ones. The rest were all nice, firm and a light beige color. Guess we lucked out. I hope I didn't ruin them by soaking in boiling water. Next time I'll do it with cold water. They're drying now. We'll see how they come out.
 

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Krazy Kitty
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Discussion Starter #10
They always have worms. That is a fact of acorns. You throw all the acorns in water and toss those that flat then go from there. You will lose about half of those you gather. Visit my website to learn more. Click on my bog above then put acorns in the search window.
My computer is really slow for some reason. I checked out your website but couldn't find acorns. I liked the one about ground nuts. I'm not sure if I would recognize the leaves though. I also liked the one on sassafrass. I have read that pine nuts are really nutritional too. We have loads of pine trees here. I'm assuming the nuts are in the pinecones.
 

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Corporate Stooge
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Acorn soup was a staple in my grandmammy's house. Every summer we'd walk through the neighbourhoods picking them up. She even had a section of the sun-room dedicated to drying them out. As stated above the ones that float get tossed. Or you could grind them down and use them as filler for sandbags or rifle rest bags, or anything else you can think of.
 

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Wild Edibles Expert
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My computer is really slow for some reason. I checked out your website but couldn't find acorns. I liked the one about ground nuts. I'm not sure if I would recognize the leaves though. I also liked the one on sassafrass. I have read that pine nuts are really nutritional too. We have loads of pine trees here. I'm assuming the nuts are in the pinecones.
Thanks. Type acorn in the search window in the middle of the home page. The problem with pine nuts is you usually expend far more energy getting them than you get from them.
 

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Wild Edibles Expert
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But it's a great task that young kids can do. Can also keep your hands busy during the hard winter months when you've got no outdoor tasks that can be completed.
Not really... if they expend more energy getting the cones than the cones give in energy they slip a little. The seed cones have to be gotten off the trees. It's no good once the cones are on the ground. To make the cones open put them next to a fire.
 

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Thanks. Type acorn in the search window in the middle of the home page. The problem with pine nuts is you usually expend far more energy getting them than you get from them.
That sounds like the description for black walnuts as well
 

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Krazy Kitty
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Discussion Starter #16
Well I got about 8 cups of what looks like light coffee grounds from the acorns. After leeching and drying, it's pretty tasteless though. I'm going to put it in the coffee mill and see if I can get it fine enough to make flour. Maybe try it in pancakes or something. There aren't too many recipes out there for acorn flour. But better than nothing if you run out of flour and no place to buy it.
 

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I might try sending the grandkids to collect pine nuts now so there'd be a good supply to have on hand if you ever had to run for it. Gathering it on the way seems impractical after hearing about the calorie expenditure.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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Good site but I think some of his advice is off a bit.... there are two ways to process acorns, with or without high heat. That influences the final base product. Cold leaching does not cook the starch in the acorn so it can be used as a thickener in soups, stews, or as a binder in meatloaf and breads. Hot water leaching cooks the starch eliminating the binding capacity. Also, if the temperature is not kept constantly hot, finish to end, the starch will bind with the tannins and the mash will be forever bitter.
I'm glad to know that about leaching. I had only tried it once and it never did lose the bitterness. Acorns don't grow in my area so I didn't get to try it again.
 
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