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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How many of us in North America or Europe would take the jobs South Koreans are now being forced to take in this bad economy?

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/07/world/asia/07pride.html?ref=global

After 9-11 I worked for over a year sorting international packages for UPS. I was a TV producer and writer.

Initially I resented it. Soon, I felt lucky to have the work, enjoyed my comrades and found pride in doing this work. I also discovered how many others working with me were capable of doing so much more.

I also worked in the nursery department at Home Depot, mainly lifting and loading 50-pound bags of manure and topsoil into customer's vehicles. That is humbling.

What kind of manual labour are you willing to do?
 

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How many of us in North America or Europe would take the jobs South Koreans are now being forced to take in this bad economy?

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/07/world/asia/07pride.html?ref=global

After 9-11 I worked for over a year sorting international packages for UPS. I was a TV producer and writer.

Initially I resented it. Soon, I felt lucky to have the work, enjoyed my comrades and found pride in doing this work. I also discovered how many others working with me were capable of doing so much more.

I also worked in the nursery department at Home Depot, mainly lifting and loading 50-pound bags of manure and topsoil into customer's vehicles. That is humbling.

What kind of manual labour are you willing to do?
Whatever it takes!
 

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I'm willing to do it to keep from starving, but I fear I'll be bad at it. I'm not the most graceful person.
 

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Wasn't too long ago I was a mechanic.
I have painted houses.
Driven truck.
Construction.
Machinist.
Auto parts retail.
As a property manager do a lot of menial labor as it is.
 

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At the age of 16 I was working in the field on my Grandparents farm. I would pick then wash and bag the produce. Then when my Grandfather came home from his day job we would drive around peddling (as he called it) the produce for extra money. I also had a part time job as a cashier at Pic-n-Save at that time.

I assembled motherboards and wire harnesses for Nurse Call systems.

I worked in the paint department at Home Depot.
 

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If I can pay my bills with it there's no job I won't do. That doesn't mean I won't be looking for a better one the whole time though.

I've worked on a farm,
shovelled manure
slaughtered animals
telemarketing(ugh..... that may be a job I won't do again)
bussed tables
worked in warehouses
pressure washed construction rental equipment in temps from 35-105
delivery driving
...all before I was 18 :)
 

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I've cleaned toilets in a gym and sewn the instructors ripped clothing to pay for gym classes for my kids, I've shoveled manure to learn farming, I've packed plants for mail order, I've put up with horribly abusive bosses to make ends meet. You do what you have to.:thumb:
 

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As cliche' as it sounds, I would and will do anything to feed, clothe and keep my son safe. I'm not saying that I will enjoy it but my father had a saying that I always remember - a company doesn't promise you happiness, only a paycheck, and that's if you do your job right.
 

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I've cleaned up sawdust at sawmills,bucked haybales and dug graves at cemeteries and loved doing them all.
 

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Frozen Patriot
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I'll do and have done just about any type of manual labor you can think of, been a desk jockey for the past 10 years or so. I do project management for environmental remediation and demolition both hydraulic and hand. Some of the hardest work out there and still on occasion get out into the field with the guys, nothing like swinging a 8# maul all day.

I actually prefer hard labor, make you feel like you have actually done something that day.

Some of the hardest work I've ever done was working in a commercial greenhouse as a young man, definitely separates the rock stars from the groupies if you know what I mean.

I would/will do whatever it takes to feed and cloth my family...:thumb:


DS
 

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6 Boys and 13 Hands
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Worked on our Diary Farm
Baled hay for neighbors for 1-2 cents a bale.
Worked as a carpenter for my neighbor before I even had drivers license
I have remolded houses
Roofed Houses
Built Houses from the foundation up
Worked in a bean warehouse sacking beans 12 hours days at 3.35 an hour
Picked rocks out of fields
Carried irrigation pipe.
Made toilets at a local factory. (don't laugh you could be flushing one of mine)
Drove Semi
Survived 4 years of working at Wal-Mart
Made windows at a window factory.
Set on my butt for four years pushing papers in the Marine Corps.
I've been to junior college twice

I have no qualms with doing any kind of manual labor, however at present it just doesn't exist. Our local unemployment rate is 9.5% and that is a lot of crap. Those figures are from the Illinois Department of Employment Security. Only the ones drawing unemployment are counted.

Being willing to work or do what it takes is nice but the work has to be there.

Sorry if I got a little off topic.
 

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How many of us in North America or Europe would take the jobs South Koreans are now being forced to take in this bad economy?

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/07/world/asia/07pride.html?ref=global

After 9-11 I worked for over a year sorting international packages for UPS. I was a TV producer and writer.

Initially I resented it. Soon, I felt lucky to have the work, enjoyed my comrades and found pride in doing this work. I also discovered how many others working with me were capable of doing so much more.

I also worked in the nursery department at Home Depot, mainly lifting and loading 50-pound bags of manure and topsoil into customer's vehicles. That is humbling.

What kind of manual labour are you willing to do?

been there done that in the last reccesion, worked as a paper boy, worked in a grocerystore stock boy, and loaded 50lb bags of feed off a conveyor and stacked them onto a pallet for shipping,mud hauler for brick masons. i think the most humiliating job was the stock boy job because i would run into ppl i knew,and was imbarressed for working a low wage job but i was glad i had a job. i was alot younger then i dont think i could do that feed job as easy as i did then.
 

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The DoomsDay Key
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I'm a software engineer now.
I can also work a shovel like a mad man!
My dad taught me how to dig a ditch when I was 10. I worked in construction as hod tender for masons, done tile work by the mile, framing. I can do plumbing and electrical, though not code trained. I'm out of shape for those jobs, and 41 years old. Might need to "ease" into it.
 

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I was laid off from an office job in December. I was there 5 years and my boss was bi-polar with no meds.........cant say I miss it!

Aside from taking care of the kids full time now I have been mucking stalls at a friends farm 5 mornings a week and I strangely love it(plus I get to ride whenever I want)

Ive waitressed and bartended in the past and loved that. Loved the people. Much better than being behind a desk!

Ill do what I have to when I have to.........
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I just want to thank all of you so far for your wonderful and candid replies to my original post about what jobs you are willing to do, and what you have done in the past when necessary.

Reading all of your comments just makes me proud to be an American and gives me great hope that we like-minded folks here supporting freedom, etc. CAN work together and get this country back on track and survive what is here and is surely to come.
 

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The DoomsDay Key
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I work in high tech and have seen a lot of "recent college grads" with this as there first job (real or otherwise). I'm greatfull everyday for the other skills I have. Thanks Dad!

That said, my most common piece of advice to new married men is this:
The first time a "honey do" project comes up, be sure to TOTAL BOTCH it, make sure you do such a LOUSY, expensive, job that the wife NEVER asks you to do anything like that again.. JK.
Wheatgrinder
 
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