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myheart'sinthehighlands
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In the last 2 months in my travels, I have seen state patrol road blocks twice. Once in Athens, Ga. last month and yesterday in Talking Rock, GA. Each time it was in the evening about dark.

This in itself is not unusual.

What amazed me is that there were at least 20 to 25 patrol cars and as many officers at ONE intersection.

I have been through license checks, insurance, checks, etc. but never, ever in my 50 years have I ever seen THAT MANY officers in ONE LOCATION.

What is going on???? What is the purpose of having that many officers in one location. It was intimidating to say the least, and I wondered how much it would cost the state to have that much man power checking driver's licenses on a friday night. 20 to 25 officers! So is this "SHOW" of man power supposed to desensitize us to a military presence in our future?

I thought they might be looking for a fugitive, but this happened twice in 2 different towns in as many months.

When was it decided to place this much man power at a license check?

No tinfoil, no disrespect, just a realistic question.
 

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ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒ&
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8,248 Posts
Dont you think 20 to 25 officers at one check point is OVERKILL?
Maybe. Maybe not. It depends on how big the road is and how much traffic they expect. They have to have enough officers to control the traffic, conduct multiple stops/searches/sobriety tests as well as officers to hold and/or tranport people arrested. Then there is the supervisory staff and onsite command.
 

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ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒ&
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8,248 Posts
This was more than I have ever seen before. Highlander, Are you a LEO? What do you base your answer on? (Curious).
Not LEO. 20 years of EMS. In EMS management now. Worked closely with many LEOs over the years on many different types of scenes. I also have several long time friend who are in LE throughout TX and other states. One is even a chief in East Texas. I was also a police explored for three years in high school.

If you understand the incident command system and the necessary logistics for the task at hand, it really isn't difficult to understand why so many officers are present.

Keep in mind that each arrest will keep one officer out of circulation for at least and hour--perhaps longer.
 

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Adventurer
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Not LEO. 20 years of EMS. In EMS management now. Worked closely with many LEOs over the years on many different types of scenes. I also have several long time friend who are in LE throughout TX and other states. One is even a chief in East Texas. I was also a police explored for three years in high school.

If you understand the incident command system and the necessary logistics for the task at hand, it really isn't difficult to understand why so many officers are present.

Keep in mind that each arrest will keep one officer out of circulation for at least and hour--perhaps longer.
so its kinda like the military for every soldier conducting combat ops theres 3 support propping him up
 

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ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒ&
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8,248 Posts
This was more than I have ever seen before. Highlander, Are you a LEO? What do you base your answer on? (Curious).
Not LEO. 20 years of EMS. In EMS management now. Worked closely with many LEOs over the years on many different types of scenes. I also have several long time friends who are in LE throughout TX and other states. One is even a chief in East Texas. I was also a police explorer for three years in high school.

If you understand the incident command system and the necessary logistics for the task at hand, it really isn't difficult to understand why so many officers are present.

Keep in mind that each arrest will keep one officer out of circulation for at least an hour--perhaps longer. And that is just for tranportation and processing. If you add in the investigation time on scene, then that extends the time it will take for that officer to clear and be available.
 

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Member
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Maybe. Maybe not. It depends on how big the road is and how much traffic they expect. They have to have enough officers to control the traffic, conduct multiple stops/searches/sobriety tests as well as officers to hold and/or tranport people arrested. Then there is the supervisory staff and onsite command.
Pretty accurate right there.
 

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myheart'sinthehighlands
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726 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Not LEO. 20 years of EMS. In EMS management now. Worked closely with many LEOs over the years on many different types of scenes. I also have several long time friends who are in LE throughout TX and other states. One is even a chief in East Texas. I was also a police explorer for three years in high school.

If you understand the incident command system and the necessary logistics for the task at hand, it really isn't difficult to understand why so many officers are present.

Keep in mind that each arrest will keep one officer out of circulation for at least an hour--perhaps longer. And that is just for tranportation and processing. If you add in the investigation time on scene, then that extends the time it will take for that officer to clear and be available.

Thank you for your response to my query. I have never experienced this before. It looked to me like a ramping up of force.
 

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keep your powder dry
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314 Posts
i went through one of those a few years back when I was returning home one night around 11 or 12. There was probably a good 10-15 officers on site. Then again, they were dealing with 3-4 cars every couple of minutes and doing the DUI checkpoints, so it required more than a couple cops.

Not that I agreed with what they were doing. But it was a quick 1 minute exercise, and if you werent drunk or stoned or had a bloody axe sitting in the back of your Miata, you were sent merrily on your way.

EDIT: publicly mantained roads arent private, and driving isnt a right. Some states have the "car as your home" type deal where youre exempt from prying LEO eyes. But many do not.

I guess I'm sort of caught on the fence on this one. I kinda agree with their validity. But then again I'd always like to err on the side of more civil liberty, not less. Hmmmmm. This is hard.
 
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