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King of Nido
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Why do people choose the nonfat powdered milk over Whole powdered milk? The non fat seems to be very expensive while the whole can be had at $14 for 3.5 pounds or 53 cups of milk. The shelf life seems to be the same, and the whole tastes a little better, and I am thinking the fat would be wanted in a situation where calories are wanted.
 

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Why do people choose the nonfat powdered milk over Whole powdered milk? The non fat seems to be very expensive while the whole can be had at $14 for 3.5 pounds or 53 cups of milk. The shelf life seems to be the same, and the whole tastes a little better, and I am thinking the fat would be wanted in a situation where calories are wanted.
Interesting question. You are right, additional calories would be preferable to me. I guess we are so used to being fat conscious that we don't often think of the increased caloric burn that some scenarios would bring.
 

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I don't think the whole lasts as long because of the fat content, actually. But it's been years since I researched that. The nonfat variety is more easily available for some of us. I've never seen anything but nonfat in the stores. I don't remember if whole milk was an option or not when I ordered my bulk supplies. If it had been and it lasted as long as nonfat, I think I would have ordered it.

I'd like to taste it some time. But I really don't mind the nonfat. I've found that the instant milk mixes a lot easier, but the powdered milk seems to taste better. Of course these were different brands, so that could make some difference.
 

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King of Nido
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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I don't think the whole lasts as long because of the fat content, actually. But it's been years since I researched that. The nonfat variety is more easily available for some of us. I've never seen anything but nonfat in the stores. I don't remember if whole milk was an option or not when I ordered my bulk supplies. If it had been and it lasted as long as nonfat, I think I would have ordered it.

I'd like to taste it some time. But I really don't mind the nonfat. I've found that the instant milk mixes a lot easier, but the powdered milk seems to taste better. Of course these were different brands, so that could make some difference.
I pick it up in the Mexican food section at WalMart. It's called Nido on the packaging. they have 2 sizes. 12.6 oz and 3.5 lbs. the use by date on the bottom is 01/Jan/2012. I am sure that i can either use it by then, or donate is as i replace it with a later date. It taste just like milk from the jug, and makes cheese just the same.
Each 13.5lbs can makes 3.31 gallons of milk or around 53 cups.
 

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I buy the non-fat powdered milk. I rotate through my milk fairly steadily, and excess fat is not something I indulge in regularly now. I have other fat sources stored for SHTF emergencies. But if you've got a good variety of food stored, you would be getting what you need fat wise anyway. I'm just not convinced yet that in a SHTF emergency everything you eat should be high-calorie, high-fat foods. Especially if you have ample food stores. A post SHTF world is certainly not the time to be looking for a surgeon to do a quadruple bypass on you.

And if I bought a lot of high calorie, high fat food now and started rotating through it, I'd feel like I was just hastening health problems and shortening my life.
 

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I think everyone will be physically working a lot harder after SHTF, so the high calories and fat will be needed. Also, in a situation where heating fuel is low, the fat and calories can both keep you warmer.
We didn't need to watch calories and cholesterol until we started sitting around watching TV after coming home from our sedentary jobs. Didn't much hear of farmers or loggers dropping dead from too much cholesterol.
I do agree that rotating through all the high fat and calories now wouldn't be too cool unless we also became more physically active now, which would actually be a good thing to contemplate doing. It's being couch potatoes that will kill us, not the fat alone.
I've got a theory about cholesterol. In my area we have some beaver dams which are very effective. Debris gets stopped by them and often adds to them, but when the spring rains come, the dams are swept away by the faster water. I think the same thing happens in our bloodstream. You work harder and get the blood pumping, it washes away the cholesterol and prevents clots (logjams) like the beaver dam in faster water.
No, not everything for preps has to be high fat or high calorie. Carbohydrates do the same thing, basically, but you have to eat more in order to get to the same place. Fats are more filling and satisfying of hunger, whereas carbohydrates can lead to low blood sugar if not accompanied by fat or protein. The carbs quickly convert to sugar in the body and, when there is too much sugar, the body will often over-compensate by removing too much of it, leading to low blood sugar and the need to eat again in a couple of hours. Carbs are basically for short term energy while fats are for longer term energy.
Whole grains are better than white rice or pasta in this respect because the whole grains, like wheat, take longer to digest, giving you a slower release of sugar to run on over a longer time, but I'd have a lot of fat sources stocked up too.
I like butter-flavored shortening for preps. Might want to fry more post-SHTF when an oven takes too much energy to run. Other sources of fat, like peanut butter, tuna canned in oil, spam, and dry whole milk, among others, are going to be important.
 

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Sunset Watcher
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Whole or non-fat powdered milk

Why do people choose the nonfat powdered milk over Whole powdered milk? The non fat seems to be very expensive while the whole can be had at $14 for 3.5 pounds or 53 cups of milk. The shelf life seems to be the same, and the whole tastes a little better, and I am thinking the fat would be wanted in a situation where calories are wanted.
Hello Wombat! The different things I've read say that non-fat has a much longer shelf life than whole powdered milk. Rancidness of milk always has to do with the fat content, so the higher the fat content the quicker it's shelf life declines. Whole milk naturally has more nutrients, but when the Schumer hits the fan over a long period, than it's the non-fat powdered milk that will exist longer.

At the local LDS cannery, they have listed that their "Milk, Nonfat Dry" has a storage life of 20 years! This absolutely stunned me because the longest I've read from different sources say about 5 years at the max. For 25 lbs. of dry nonfat milk, you are only charged $35.40 here, which is unheard of where I live. Their prices are incredible online, as well (a little more expensive than going down to the local LDS cannery, but still cheaper than a lot of places out there. You don't have to be LDS either. I'm not. Here's a website: www.ldscatalog.com

They offer a variety of different things. Check them out online and physically, if there's a cannery at a reasonable distance from your home.
 

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I think everyone will be physically working a lot harder after SHTF, so the high calories and fat will be needed. Also, in a situation where heating fuel is low, the fat and calories can both keep you warmer.
We didn't need to watch calories and cholesterol until we started sitting around watching TV after coming home from our sedentary jobs. Didn't much hear of farmers or loggers dropping dead from too much cholesterol.
I do agree that rotating through all the high fat and calories now wouldn't be too cool unless we also became more physically active now. It's being couch potatoes that will kill us, not the fat alone.
Yep, a more sedentary lifestyle now coupled with a high fat diet is lethal. And since I rotate through my stored milk fairly regularly, I keep the fat free variety. I keep my fat storage in shortening(for baking), butter powder, vegetable oil and peanut butter. That's the long term stuff that I can donate when it's close to expiring. Except for the peanut butter. I have a problem with peanut butter......:D:
 

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I pick it up in the Mexican food section at WalMart. It's called Nido on the packaging. they have 2 sizes. 12.6 oz and 3.5 lbs. the use by date on the bottom is 01/Jan/2012. I am sure that i can either use it by then, or donate is as i replace it with a later date. It taste just like milk from the jug, and makes cheese just the same.
Each 13.5lbs can makes 3.31 gallons of milk or around 53 cups.
I'm going to look for that and give it a try. We use powdered milk exclusively. This is a mostly hispanic city so the Walmart here should have it.

So far the best powdered milk I've tried is Pine Ridge Pantry. It came in a 9 lb bucket. It uses 2 2/3 cups per gallon. It doesn't mix as easily as some I've tried, but it also doesn't have that overpowering lactose flavor that some powdered milks have.
 

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Does anyone know how long powered milk would last if you open the packages bags whatever, used mylar bags, vacuumed sealed, O2 absorbers, 5 gal buckets?? 20 yrs? everything I find in a #10 can says only 10yrs. I would love to add this to my food prepps the only one I've found to last 20yrs is from the earlier link on here from Costo and their packed in for specific servings which is cool. Wanted to know if anyone had long term packing experience with this stuff? Thank you ahead
 

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Does anyone know how long powered milk would last if you open the packages bags whatever, used mylar bags, vacuumed sealed, O2 absorbers, 5 gal buckets?? 20 yrs? everything I find in a #10 can says only 10yrs. I would love to add this to my food prepps the only one I've found to last 20yrs is from the earlier link on here from Costo and their packed in for specific servings which is cool. Wanted to know if anyone had long term packing experience with this stuff? Thank you ahead
You can't improve on the packaging of the #10 cans, but packages or bags are better repacking the way you suggest. You are taking the air out of the packaging, which is what will preserve it longer.
 

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So far the best powdered milk I've tried is Pine Ridge Pantry. It came in a 9 lb bucket. It uses 2 2/3 cups per gallon. It doesn't mix as easily as some I've tried, but it also doesn't have that overpowering lactose flavor that some powdered milks have.
Is that something local, or did you order it on the internets. Could you provide a link please. I did a search of Pine Ridge Pantry and came up with bupkis.
 

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Does anyone know how long powered milk would last if you open the packages bags whatever, used mylar bags, vacuumed sealed, O2 absorbers, 5 gal buckets?? 20 yrs? everything I find in a #10 can says only 10yrs. I would love to add this to my food prepps the only one I've found to last 20yrs is from the earlier link on here from Costo and their packed in for specific servings which is cool. Wanted to know if anyone had long term packing experience with this stuff? Thank you ahead
If it's packed with O2 absorbers and kept in a cool place, it'll last a very long time. I'm currently using some that has been stored for more than 10 years in a metal storage shed in the hot Texas heat. It was packed in a bucket with O2 absorbers and no mylar. It's fine. In fact I'm liking it better than the boxes of powdered milk I was buying from Sam's. So far I've tried a #10 can from Walton Feed and this bucket is from Pine Ridge Pantry. I'd say that 20 years isn't pushing things too much. But as always, "store what you eat, and eat what you store". It doesn't make sense to put away strange foods that you would never eat otherwise, then hope you can adapt to it during a crisis.

Is that something local, or did you order it on the internets. Could you provide a link please. I did a search of Pine Ridge Pantry and came up with bupkis.
I don't know who sells it now. Their cannery packages under custom labels for a lot of suppliers. I originally bought this back in the late '90s during the Y2K scare. We used to have a grocery store chain here called Smith's. During the scare they had storage foods from several companies and sold it for below wholesale. Such as #10 cans of freeze dried peas or 5 gallon buckets of dried hashbrowns for $5. I did my best to keep their shelves empty for months. I still have a bunch of them left and I've been rotating through them lately.
 

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End of the Roader
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Why do people drink skim, low fat, non fat, 2 % milk.... some gawdawful stuff... I only drink milk straight. Preferably raw, with several inches of cream on top. Anyone drinking 'near' milk has mental problems. Grownups aren't meant to drink milk in the first place, and if you are going to drink it, drink it the way it's meant to be, not some health nazi's version of 'good'....

We have fresh goat milk available constantly, so rarely buy any kind of milk. Do have a couple of containers of "NIDO" whole dried milk.

If there were a shtf, we'd probably make do with less production (because of lack of replacement grain supplements) of our dairy goats.
 

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texican, I would drink Creamline (unhomogenized with cream on the top) if I could get it anymore, which I can't. Unless I want to pay $8. a gallon, anyway. Straight out of the cow would be ok, too, if I could trust that the bucket didn't have some kind of filth in it from the milker's hands.

I drink 2% because I like the taste. For no other reason. Whole milk (homogenized) is too greasy to me.
 
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