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Discussion Starter #1
* Virgin shooter alert *

I've decided that it's time that I buy my own gun and learn how to use it. My dilemma is that I have no idea what kind I should buy...or even how much one would cost. Retarded, I know.:xeye:

So...this is where all of you come in: Can you give advice on what would be a good choice? And one with a reasonable price-point? Give me some "Guns 101"...

There is a shooting range not too far from my house...never been inside. So, any tips on what I should expect when I go there for the first time would be helpful to me too. (I don't want to look like a complete jacka**...although, I'm sure the guys at the gun range would love to show a cute girl the ropes :D:).

I figure: I've got my LT & ST food storage going strong, water purification down, bug out bags, etc. Now it's time to learn defense.

This crap in Israel is making me realize that we really don't have much time.....:eek:

But, I digress. Thanks in advance for all of your advice!

Jennsocutie
 

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Last of the First Line
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* Virgin shooter alert *
.22's... Get a .22 handgun, and a .22 rifle - and learn the basics of handling a gun, and shooting it. When you're ready to move on - don't sell the .22's. They'll be good for pest control, and rounding up dinner.

After you've got the basics down, you should be a bit more familiar with firearms. Then you can decide for yourself what to get. Try out a few different guns/rifles at different calibers. Buy what feels best for you.

There is no easy quick fix answer for guns.
 

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NRA Instructor-Ohio CCW
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If you can afford it, get a AR or AK before they are banned.

Try shooting a few 9mm handguns at the range. They probably have some to rent. If you can handle the 9mm, get a handgun to carry. Decide how you want to carry, and get a gun that will accommodate your chosen method of carrying.

Get your CCW. Michigan is a shall issue state. You will need to take a class and fill out an application. The class is a good idea, it will teach you the basics of pistol shooting.
 

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I just bought a .380 as a first gun. I went into the gun shop when I thought they wouldn't be busy, talked to the guys behind the counter and told them what I was looking for (basically what you said in your post) but sort of knew that was what I wanted since I planned to carry it.

They let me shoot one before I bought it (like I'd know any difference between them), told me about the classes they offer and the different instructors availability, that on Tuesday is Ladies Day (free range time) and sent me on my way.

They were helpful and didn't make me feel like a fool for being a "virgin shooter". But be warned; it's like trying to eat just one potato chip. I'm ready to get another couple!
 

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I would also go with the 22. cheap and easy to handle, good for small game.
my girlfriend picked up a 7.62x54 a few months back. good old heavy rifle, bolt action,and cheap. cost us about $100 and ammo is about 4 bucks for 20 rounds. plus it's big enough to put down any size animal you want to shoot at deer, bear, elk, whatever.
 

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Leave Me Alone
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I taught alot of Womens Gun Courses over the years. Women who were inexperienced usually showed up with everything from 44 magnums with 8" barrels to 22 Derringers. They always fell in love with 2 guns. A Smith and Wesson 38 Special 2" barrel small frame like a Model 36 or 60, even an airweight version, and a Smith and Wesson Model 66 or other 4" Barrelled 357 Mag. You can shoot light target loads like wadcutters in both, that kick a little more than a 22 in most cases and work your way up to hotter loads like +P Hollowpoints and 357 Magnum rounds. They are pretty versatile and easy to load and unload. They liked the way they could easily check to see it the gun was loaded and the total ease of use.
A semi-auto is a good way to go, ONLY if you will train and train well with that gun. When we talk about malfunction drills, working the slide properly to chamber a round, etc, it gets a little more complicated especially if the woman is small in stature and strength. Many men I know that have and actually carry or keep a semi-auto, are very limited in their training and would pee in their pants if they had a malfunction in a stressful situation. Do it for yourself. You're not Rambo or an expert tactical operator. There is NOTHING wrong with a good revolver, and they are just as deadly and useful in survival as most semi autos in the hands of the average Joe. Pay your range a visit. See if they have a loaner or rental gun that you could get a range officer to allow you to shoot. Better still, see if you can find a local handgun course, and many times they will have an extra handgun or two to let you shoot. My advice is don't spend less than about 300 to 350 bucks on each used. New will be closer to 400- 500. I would suggest buying both. You can use one or two types of ammo in both, and have one for around the house and bug-out, and the smaller snubbie for concealed carry. Once you have done your work with these two guns, you can move on to semi-autos and fancier stuff if you wish.
My wife is a competitive shooter and shoots 1911's and glocks, but carries a 38 snubby airweight in the waistband or purse and her home gun of choice is a 357 Revolver. I can't get her to give them up. By the way, I would hate to get in a gun fight with her, when she's armed with a revolver. She's a little bad*ss.:eek:
For a long gun, a good 22 rifle will get you into practice and is cheap to shoot, until you decide to go bigger.
 

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well jennsocutie I think that 1911 head banger as well as prettypaisley both give some good advice. I teach at a local store and I usually tell any one that comes in to rent and try several hand guns I can teach the course regardless of what you own and I would rather the student to find the right fit and purchase that then to buy what ever they like the looks of and then have a bad experience. So find a reputable store and try a bunch of guns then decide.
 

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If at all possible I would strongly suggest that you go to a range where they offer rental weapons. This will give you an oppertunity to rent a couple of different weapons and see what it is that you like and feel comfortable with. A handgun purchase is a pretty pricey purchase for a quality made defensive handgun and is something you kinda want to get right the first time. Additioanlly there will often be someone there at the shop that can take you out and get you started after breifing you on safe operation and how to shoot although this trianing will be informal.

I would start first by renting a 22 rimfire for a number of reasons. Its easy to handle, ammo is dirt cheap and you can shoot it until your silly. This will help you get comfortable behind the trigger and with using and shooting a gun without breaking the bank or developing the dreaded "flinch" from jerking on the trigger due to the recoil and loud muzzle blast of a larger round. I would suggest trying a revover or a auto loader depending on what you think your ultimate gun purchase will be so that you will be accustom to the genral operation of that style a gun.

After you are comfortable shooting a rental 22 then you can go and rent another larger gun, say something in the range of a 38 spl or 9mm. You should at this point be pretty 10-4 on operation and it will be just a question of a little more noise and recoil, but noithing that should prove intimidating to you. There are many revolvers in 38 and lots of pistols in 9mm that you can try until you find a model thats to your liking. If at that point you want something with a little more authority you can then step up to a 40 S&W or 45 ACP. At anrate you can find a gun at this point you like and buy it.

Once you buy a gun you should seriously look into some type of formal trianing. This is needed for a number of reasons. First it will be good for some skill building and safe handling skills. Second it will most likely make you a much better shooter. 3rd if you should get in a shooting, when your on the stand and being questioned you can say that you have had some professional trianing. That alone is reason enough to spend a couple of hundred on training and will be worth its weight in gold should the unfortunate happen! You dont need to get a school like Gunsite costing a couple of grand plus, you just need to egt some formal training. Your local gun shop can probably turn you on to someone who can provide such a service to you.

A new gun will most likely cost you at least 500.00 plus for a quality example irregardless of your choice in a shooting iron. For most money is an issue, but dont skimp here, get a good quality gun from the get go. You most definitely want adjustible sights for sure, preferably night sights as these can cost some money as an after market parts puchrase and the labor for a smith to install them. Doesnt matter if you like Blue Steel, Stainless of one of the new Polymer guns choice is yours. Personally I have a few horror stories about Polymer guns although they can be awful nice and light to carry, so I would suggest looking long and hard at one with a stainless steel finish for ease of cleaning and maintenance. I also like this type of finish becuase the more you use the gun the slicker and smoother its operation becomes as the parts start to break in and wear a little. But again the chioce is yours. Some good grips will often times make a good gun great and a heack of a lot more comfortable to shoot. Being a woman your hands are probably not quiet as meaty as mine and something a little thinner and prehaps soemthing with some cushion might bode well for you. I know I have added soft rubber pachmyer grips to most of my guns and its been a very worth while purchase! Your milage my very. As for caliber...this has been the subject of many a blood bath, but in my opinion defensive calbers start at 38 spl or 9mm. Sure gang bangers kill each other quiet often with 25 ACP, 32 ACP and .380's, I see thier handy work all the time, but these calibers are a little on the anemic side of things. You dont need a 44 mag but you do need something you can count on and those two rounds power level wise ought to be the minimum. Some calibers to check out are 38 spl/357 Mag (357 Mag is considerably more powerful than a 38 spl and must be used in a 357 Mag gun which can also shoot the 38 spl too), 9mm, 40 S&W, 44 spl and 45 ACP. All of these are fairly mild recoil wise but have enough power to see you thru an ugly encounter if you do your part. All are pretty common and I prefer the bigger rounds like the 45 ACP and have a fondness for the 44 spl. Those two just might not be your cup of tea though... For ammo, get something like Hydra Shocks, Gold Dot or Golden Sabre or some other high performance defensive ammo for your gun. You can use ball ammo for practice as its cheap and easy to get. But do how ever shoot some of the ammo you intend to use in your gun for defense. This will keep you familar with your chosen load and you can asertain if your gun will operate reliably with it.

After you have gotten your gun, practice, practic and practice! Dont be the typical Harry Home Owner and buy a gun and one box of ammo shoot half of it at the range the day you buy it and then still have the last 20 rounds in the night stand 3 years later. That wont make you proficient with your new purchase. I suggest busting out a box of ammo once a month preferably a bit more than that to build you skill, confidence in your skill so that should the time come you can preform like a well trained champ.

I am so sure I have left out a few details and I am sure there will be some other opinions some prehaps even better than what I have provided here but with what I have provided you can not go too far wrong. Do some research, some soul searching and choose wisely and enjoy your new purchase and welcome to the wonderful world of being a gun owner!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Troll Comment is Way Off Base

troll detected

No...no troll here. Just new and I've noticed that the only people who get good responses to their threads are ones with catchy titles. I see some posts where 900+ people view it....but then only 6 comment...and the poor person doesn't really get a good answer to their quesiton.

Thank you to all so far who have offered advice on this. I really appreciate you taking the time!

Jennsocutie
 

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Like every one says start with a 22 and learn how to shoot it. When you start getting good. Kinda make a game out of it and see how good you can get, Like being able to hit a smaller target than your friend can. Just be safe no mater what you shoot.
 

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American fearmaker
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First off do some more research on the internet about female shooters. There are a couple of websites for them. Call the NRA in Virginia at: (703) 267-1428. That number is for the Instructor Programs group. Ask and see if they can give you information about a local NRA certified instructor in your area.

Also talk to some of the people at your local gun store to see if they can refer you to a local range that will help a new shooter learn to shoot. That range will also be able to refer you to their in-house NRA instructor if they have one.

As an NRA instructor I would suggest that you think about and research getting a .22 caliber revolver with a 4 inch barrel to help you develop as a basic shooter. Ammo for a .22 is cheap, generally under $15.00 a brick. A brick of .22 Long Rifle ammo is actually 500 rounds in a long box shaped sort of like a small brick. The 4 inch barrel helps you control the firearm better than a shorter snub nosed revolver and it isn't as heavy as the 6 inch revolver. In other words, a revolver with a 4 inch barrel is a good place to start your firearms training.

After you've mastered the .22 you can step up to a .38 special revolver or a .357 magnum revolver with a 4 inch barrel. Keep in mind that .38 caliber ammo WILL work in either a .38 caliber or a .357 magnum revolver. After you've been shooting with .38 caliber ammo for awhile you should then think about trying to learn to master a good 9 millimeter semi-automatic pistol.

Welcome to the world of shooting sports. You're going to have fun.
 

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Wide awake
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Jen, I realize you've recieved quite a bit of advice already, but I'm going to go ahead and throw in my two cents. I agree with everything that was said about the .22. If you go with it, go with a good semi from Savage Arms. They're cheap and of good quality.

Here's where I deviate just a bit. I just went through this with my mom and sister. My first recommendation? A 20ga Shotgun. Here's why:

-They are unduly versatile: They can fire birdshot, buckshot, or slug.
-One pump of a good pump shotgun is the universal symbol for "back the f*** out of my house before I blow a mudhole in your chest". No firing required.
-You may not have to be a very good shot if you're using bird or buckshot.
-20ga. has minimal recoil (although more than a .22)
-Slugs have incredible stopping power

Bottom line? I'd buy a .22 and 20 ga. if I were you. Go with a Mossberg or Remington 870 for the shotgun($400 or so), or you can go Maverick Arms if you want to stay around $200. And don't forget to stock up on ammo. Also, I agree with the excellent advice from Herd Sniper. Invest in some lessons. You may pick up some bad habits at the range from some schmo who is trying to pick up women (if indeed you are a woman). Build safe, solid, effective skills on the fundamentals from the beginning.
 

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Get yourself a boyfreind who knows how to shoot; both problems will be solved!

38 smith airweight 2" snub holds five rounds, no "gadgets", no safety and loud; don't aim, simply point and rip away till empty when the threat is 10 feet away or less, not a "target pistol" OR a 22 magnum rimfire revolver, 7 shot. My wife and mother feel secure with operating these two simple weapons.

My 75 pound 11 year old step daughter has been shooting 9 mm and 1911's for two years; don't let the "big stuff" scare you, these are not magnum loads.

Buy hearing protection and leave the hoop earings at home.

Say hi to the Nuge.
 

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What's perfect for you depends on a lot of things. A gun should be good to handle. The bigger the calibre, the bigger the punch it gives, but also the bigger the recoil. The recoil shouldn't be too big. Also, if the gun is heavier, the recoil is less. So a very heavy gun has relatively little recoil, but then again, a heavy gun is not fun to carry around.

Many people mention .22. It's a good calibre, nasty little bullets and easy to handle. Might be an excelent choice. There is also the 7,65 mm and the 9mm short (9mm short is another name for .380), these are lighter then the 9mm, don't have that much recoil, and have some more knock down power then the .22.

9mm and .40 is what most cops use. It has mucho power but if it's fired from a light gun like a Glock or an H&K or a SIG it does have some recoil, that compromises handling.

To shorten a long story, find out what works for you. Try to shoot as many as you can, see whats available and make your choice. Once you have it, get familiair with it. Go to the range now and then. And remember, any gun beats no gun, big time.

Good luck!
 

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I'll fix it
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Your gender has no bearing on what you are capable of using.
You owe it to yourself to look at a Glock 19. It's 9mm with a 15 round magazine.
(2 included) There is no reason you should not have as many rounds as the BG.
I suggest using this LE Federal or LE Speer Gold Dot 124gr +P or larger.
http://www.ammunitiontogo.com/catal...t-124gr-p-hp-ammo/cName/9mm-hollow-point-ammo
Get as much as you can afford because the rumor is LEO ammo will be shipped direct from the mfg to the agencies in 09 and will not be available to civilians.
With the minimum self defense caliber you should use these hot, well performing loads.
After all you are protecting your life and you should not comprimise.
You may also want to look at a Glock 30SF in 45ACP for extreme stopping power.
Federal ammo of course.
http://www.ammunitiontogo.com/catalog1/product_info.php/cPath/23_76_122/products_id/1394
There should be no doubt you mean business if you ever need to protect yourself.
 

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Iēsous
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Get yourself a boyfreind who knows how to shoot; both problems will be solved!

38 smith airweight 2" snub holds five rounds, no "gadgets", no safety and loud; don't aim, simply point and rip away till empty when the threat is 10 feet away or less, not a "target pistol" OR a 22 magnum rimfire revolver, 7 shot. My wife and mother feel secure with operating these two simple weapons.

My 75 pound 11 year old step daughter has been shooting 9 mm and 1911's for two years; don't let the "big stuff" scare you, these are not magnum loads.

Buy hearing protection and leave the hoop earings at home.

Say hi to the Nuge.
Wow

Im gonna teach my daughter to avoid men with opinions of women like that
 
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