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Founder
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Ok, are yall ready for this one??


Map Reading...

Get your GPS out and that'll tell you where you are... Why do you need a compass?
What a load of **** this is.
Bravo!!!!!!!! :thumb:

My reply:
You have never done any serious (where you could get lost) hiking have you? You always have a backup, and there is no excuse for basic navigation skills. I am going to take what you said and post it on the website. Everyone there will get a good laugh.
That comment was posted on this video

 

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You done lost me. You better be able to figure out where you're at with that compass, or you won't be able to figure out where to go from there. Declination is right on the bottom of the map, not so hard to get that right.
 

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Backpacker I Adventurer
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Bah why do you need a compass? The map shows you where North is. See just look at that little arrow thing in the corner that shows North. Now how can you get lost so long as you have a map with that arrow.
 

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Here is a good example of how I had to learn the hard way.

Went flying...forgot my maps for some reason. Thought to myself...I've got a GPS int he plane...no worries.

Halfway through the flight, GPS craps out. Granted, I had a compass, but I didn't have a map. A sense of panic hit me for a brief moment until I realized I had other methods of navigating without either the GPS or map. (also electronic mind you, but they didn't fail. - Loran & ADF) I got lucky. Planes tend to run out of gas eventually and being lost with no where to land can be bad.

What is this guy goign to do when the batteries give out on that GPS? Opps...Breaking News...hiker found dead due to exposure, dehydration etc. etc.
 

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Wanderer
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GPS receivers are nice, but they don't always work, and without WAAS enabling are not very accurate. Batteries are one problem for GPS, but so are deep narrow canyons, tall dense tree canopy, heavy rain or snow, etc. A map and compass, with the knowledge of their proper use, will always work. And be careful of the declination chart on the topo maps. If the map is very old, it has probably changed. Contact USGS on line, or phone a local surveyor for up to date declination info. A map and compass will tell you where you are, where you want to go, and help you plan a good route to get there. That's called orienteering, it's an olympic sport. The U.S. fields a team, as do most other countries, but it's not well publicised here.
 

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AKA The Dragon
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I have a GPS, but is not my primary navigation tool. I have spoken to many people on their choice of GPS only.
If the GPS system fails or the personal GPS fails for what ever reason, then you are blind as a bat.
From my military days - maps, compass, protractor and roma and, a nice sharp pencil.
Of course skill on how to use them.
Other aids to use in the bush is where the sun rises and sets to give a general direction of the four points of the compass.
Star constellations at night will also help. Surprising how many people don't know this in these times.
 
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About three years ago,I was on Lake Huron,using marine GPS.The military evidently was playing around with the signals,as the unit would aquire,run a couple minutes,then lose,all in a clear sky,with a reliable unit,not junk.Same unit functioned fine previous and subsequent weekends. It would be a logical thing to switch on/off if they expected some kind of GPS guided munition might be lauched.
 

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American fearmaker
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Keep in mind that you have 3 kinds of north. You have grid north, magnetic north and true north. Grid north are those lines that you see on your map. Those lines are there to help you determine distance on the map and on the ground. Magnetic north is the magnetic north pole which is actually somewhere in Canada, not at the North Pole. Magnetic north is what moves your compass needle all around and gives you a magnetic reference to use for when you're moving across land and sea. True north is the North Pole. True north is a way to describe the top of our planet, which is actually underwater when you take away all the ice up there. The reason you have to allow for deviation in compasses is because of where the magnetic north pole is situated as compared to where you are. In the USA magnetic deviation is only about 1 to 4 degrees off because we are so close to the magnetic north pole by comparison to the rest of the world. If I remember right, in Viet Nam, near the equator, the magnetic deviation was 12 or more degrees which very quickly can add up to missing your location when moving by compass. A 10 degree error at 1,000 yards is a 100 yard mistake. Now try making that sort of move with a compass for a number of miles and you can end up really lost.
 

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Technology is great and we should use it whenever we can to make our lives easier but that doesn't mean you forget or don't learn how to use the basics. When my Wife and I go hiking we take two GPS's and we each carry two compasses, I know that's a bit of overkill. I'd rather have to many compasses than be caught one short.
 

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i do a lot of geocaching and my gps is pretty basic, often youll get a clue like 200 feet west of such and such, and it takes my gps a long time to orient and doesent show any compass references, so i always carry a compass with me
 

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I'm sure the gentleman responding to Kev's video has never left the safety of his 1980 Chevy Chevette and wouldn't need anything other than a GPS to navigate to the local Dollar Tree.

GPSs are great, and I love using one. I'm just not going to go into an unfamiliar area, rural or urban, without having a compass in case of an emergency.
 
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