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"The Grey Wolf"
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So i ordered a plastic 55 gallon drum to store water in and it said on the instructions that it is rated for 200lbs does that mean i should only put 200lbs of water in it? Cause 55 gallons of water would be about 400lbs.

Any help would be appreciated
 

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Beer Truck Door Gunner
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So i ordered a plastic 55 gallon drum to store water in and it said on the instructions that it is rated for 200lbs does that mean i should only put 200lbs of water in it? Cause 55 gallons of water would be about 400lbs.

Any help would be appreciated
Got a link to where you bought it?

It may help to see what you bought.

But if you bought the fairly generic thick walled food grade blue barrel then it will handle the weight.
 
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That wouldn't mean the amount of weight you could stack on it by chance, would it? It wouldn't make any sense for a 55 gal. water barrel to only hold 200 lbs. inside weight.
 

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Site says UN rated....didn't see a weight?
A UN rating means "United Nations."...but you need more number in the description...so that rating mean nothing.

https://www.newpig.com/expertadvice/cracking-the-code-explaining-un-ratings/

As it is an open to drum...may be intended to hold something other than liquid as you are correct.... most liquid will weight over 200#.

If you are not going to move it...I don't see what difference it would make.
Is water to be potable?,(drinking cooking?)......If so you should have a food grade drum.

Guess it beats a mud puddle....
 

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This is not a food grade barrel. That's why you got a "deal". They make bags to fit inside to make it food grade. (I think I remember seeing them at one time) I got mine from a hydroponics store that is across from a food manufacturer. $30 out the door. Could only carry 7. Stunk like pickles (gherkins on the label) but cleaned up well. Call around locally and see what you can find for a real food grade barrel.
 

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Does not make sense they would sell a container you could only fill half way. Perhaps call the company and ask.
Didn't mention liquid......stuff like absorbent "pig" for oil spill and Hazmat supplies com in barrels....
In this case "55 gal" appears to be a size, rather than liquid volume.

Second the "food grade" drums....mine came from the Neslie's Chocolate factory....
 

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I didnt buy the blue one because its going up in price (was $50 a month ago but is currently at $100 on amazon probably because of election)

I bought this one
https://www.amazon.com/Eagle-1656BL...qid=1478648893&sr=8-1&keywords=55+gallon+drum
As Offrink said, you just wasted your money. In fact you overpayed for a nonfood grade barrel.

Black food grade barrels are as rare as hen's teeth.

Put no drinking water or food directly into it. Try to return it if you can.

In the meantime, buy the blue barrel that Heartlander linked to.
 

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We got our 32/55 gal barrels free, they were filled with dr pepper syrup for sodas.We took them to the carwash and cleaned then 4 at a time. That source ran out in April of this year.We have two places nearby that sell recondition 55 gal drums for $30 each.

One thing I wanted to mention, we only put 50 gallons of water in our 55 gal drums so we can add purification liquids. Also any barrels we have are layed on their sides in a wooden craddle and stacked 3 high. Never stack these 55 gal blue barrels directly on top of each other. Not only is it extremely dangerous but will weaken the barrels outer skin.
 

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If you look on Craigslist, you'll likely find blue food grade barrels for $10-$20. You'll need to clean them out, but they're food grade. The last batch I got used to contain soy sauce.
There is no marking on any barrel that denotes food grade. Blue barrels are typically a common choice for food grade, but there is no guarantee or certification available on the actual plastic of a barrel. Blue nonfood barrels are commonplace for cleaning chemicals.

Only a manufacturer's certification on a new barrel or the obvious proof on a used barrel will guarantee that it is food safe. The obvious proof being both food residue and the food packer's label still attached. It's easy enough to smear dollar store fruit jam on a barrel of unknown provenance. The factory food label is a bit harder. But loose labels exist and glue is cheap enough. I could dummy up one that fits even my harder standards in no time at all and only cost a couple dollars. Buy some nonfood grade ones for $5, photocopy some labels off the internet, drop $3 at the dollar store for cheap grape jelly, and then flip them for $35-40 all day long. A 500% profit. I could do a batch of 20 in a day easy, spend about $120-150 overall, and put them on Craigslist to net $600. Nice work if you are willing to be a scammer.

The used barrel market is packed with scammers. Probably more scammers than legit ones, actually. We've even had them come to SB trying to buy any and all barrels they can find.

A used nonfood grade barrel has a value of between $0 and $5. A used food grade one has a value between $20 and $50. The incentive to lie and cheat is worth twenty or more dollars on something where ignorance is strong, proof is hard to come by, and people are wanting a price break. I've seen a lot of these scammers.

No smart prepper should even ever bother with the used food grade barrel marketplace.

Either buy new or go fetch them yourself from a food packer. If time is tight then go pay full price. If money is tight then go spend the time hunting down food packers locally where you can get them free or almost free. If you have no time and no money then I suggest you have your life too disorganized to worry about prepping. Those with neither time or money need to focus on their current modern life disaster first before worrying about a disaster down the road.
 

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"The Grey Wolf"
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Its made of high grade Polyethylene and according to another website it states that it is food grade

The blue one you posted is made of same material so why would this one not be considered food grade?
 

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"The Grey Wolf"
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I looked on their website and found this as well

All Eagle Drums Feature:

Blow-molded HDPE construction, Chemical and weather resistant, HDPE incinerates completely, United Nations (UN) Certified to HM-81, Operating temperature range (-30ºF to 130ºF), Drop Tested - Max Weight @ 0ºF (48hrs.), Approved for use with Packing Groups I,II and III, UV Protection Package, 3/16" Wall Thickness, UL 94HB Flammability Rating, Nestable for ideal storage (except model 1656), FDA 21 CFR 177.1520 Food Grade Quality, Stack Tested - three high a maximum weight capacity (24hrs.)
 

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Its made of high grade Polyethylene and according to another website it states that it is food grade

The blue one you posted is made of same material so why would this one not be considered food grade?
Anything blown in plastic is blown in a mold.

To keep it from sticking to the mold a release agent is used. Food grade release agents cost a lot more. Someone buying a barrel to put a cleaning chemical in is not going to pay an upcharge for something they don't need.

Plastic isn't like harder materials. Even the name "plastic" was derived from its nature. Even before you could buy things made from plastic the term existed to describe a state of matter that was not completely solid. This means the material is semipermeable. Something that gets on plastic doesn't completely come off as it bonds and starts traveling through the pores to the other side.

So a release agent cannot be completely removed. You must either use a food grade release agent or a nonfood one. Which type you choose becomes the permanent nature of the barrel. Well, not exactly. You can make a food grade one into a nonfood grade by contaminating it, but never the other direction.

There is absolutely no standardized marking for a food grade barrel. Only the recycle code exists and is only for recycling purposes. Only a barrel manufacturer's certification can prove the release agent used was food grade. By default, if you got the barrel from a food factory then you can reliably trust it was also food grade.

You are free to do as you like, but you can be sure that the release agent used in your barrel was not food grade. By definition, any water you put in it now becomes "nonpotable".

I highly suggest trying to stop or return that order. The Walmart link above is your best value choice to absolutely assure you get a new food safe barrel.

Also believe when I say that black is almost never used as food grade due to the nature of most black coloring agents.

As for their website, I'll say this. I've never seen a bulk plastics blower that only produced food grade barrels. The precisely same equipment can be used for both types and the reality is that nonfood grade barrels are the most common type by volume. Food is but a small segment of the marketplace for bulk containers. Lots of nonfood chemicals out there that need packaging. Faced with that fact and the other fact that no commercial buyer that doesn't need food grade release agents is ever going to pay the upcharge, then for them to say every barrel they make is food grade sounds highly suspicious.

Why take all this risk? It's your emergency water supply. Short of air, nothing is more precious for life.


If you had read here in advance you would see just about every thread on barrels discuss this.
 
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Somewhere on a ranch...
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There is no marking on any barrel that denotes food grade. Blue barrels are typically a common choice for food grade, but there is no guarantee or certification available on the actual plastic of a barrel. Blue nonfood barrels are commonplace for cleaning chemicals.

Only a manufacturer's certification on a new barrel or the obvious proof on a used barrel will guarantee that it is food safe. The obvious proof being both food residue and the food packer's label still attached. It's easy enough to smear dollar store fruit jam on a barrel of unknown provenance. The factory food label is a bit harder. But loose labels exist and glue is cheap enough. I could dummy up one that fits even my harder standards in no time at all and only cost a couple dollars. Buy some nonfood grade ones for $5, photocopy some labels off the internet, drop $3 at the dollar store for cheap grape jelly, and then flip them for $35-40 all day long. A 500% profit. I could do a batch of 20 in a day easy, spend about $120-150 overall, and put them on Craigslist to net $600. Nice work if you are willing to be a scammer.

The used barrel market is packed with scammers. Probably more scammers than legit ones, actually. We've even had them come to SB trying to buy any and all barrels they can find.

A used nonfood grade barrel has a value of between $0 and $5. A used food grade one has a value between $20 and $50. The incentive to lie and cheat is worth twenty or more dollars on something where ignorance is strong, proof is hard to come by, and people are wanting a price break. I've seen a lot of these scammers.

No smart prepper should even ever bother with the used food grade barrel marketplace.

Either buy new or go fetch them yourself from a food packer. If time is tight then go pay full price. If money is tight then go spend the time hunting down food packers locally where you can get them free or almost free. If you have no time and no money then I suggest you have your life too disorganized to worry about prepping. Those with neither time or money need to focus on their current modern life disaster first before worrying about a disaster down the road.
In spite of the fact that you say I'm not a "smart prepper", like you obviously are, I buy my barrels from a source my family has known for many years, who owns a local feed store. Extremely reputable.

The Craigslist suggestion is just that, a suggestion. It's up to each person (the ones you say aren't very smart) to decide if seeing a manufacturer's label and food residue is enough for them or not.

Thanks for your condescension.
 

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In spite of the fact that you say I'm not a "smart prepper", like you obviously are, I buy my barrels from a source my family has known for many years, who owns a local feed store. Extremely reputable.

The Craigslist suggestion is just that, a suggestion. It's up to each person (the ones you say aren't very smart) to decide if seeing a manufacturer's label and food residue is enough for them or not.

Thanks for your condescension.
And thanks for the strawman.

First and foremost I was talking about buying them from a source that you have no personal knowledge about. You actually buy them from a first time user, which is precisely what I recommended when I said get them from someone who buys them for the food content, not for the barrel. You basically used my exact advice to try to pose a rebuttal. Telling someone they are wrong and giving essentially the same advice to counter it seems rather foolish.

And for you taking it personally when I used the generic "a smart prepper" is both a strawman and a good dose of insecurity.

Using Craigslist is about the worst idea possible to get a water barrel. Absolutely zero chance of verifying where that barrel has been.
 

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Somewhere on a ranch...
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No insecurity here, I just get tired of reading you bash everyone's head in with your "my way or the highway" attitude every time I venture into the "food and water" section. Some people have suggestions that aren't like yours, and that's OK. People are smart enough to do a risk analysis to determine if it's the right move or not.

Don't be so sensitive when people offer alternatives.
 
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