Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 20 of 62 Posts
Joined
·
1,813 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings all.

I think everyone knows I’m a fan of one-off calibers. Specifically the old ones that still live on, just with limited factory support. Things like 280Rem, 32 Winchester and the sort. Sure they don’t do anything better than any other caliber, but they’re just something different. And that’s where my interest in 41 Remington Magnum comes from.

The 41mag isn’t anything particularly special: it’s just in the middle between 357 and 44mag, though closer to the 44 side of the spectrum. Factory loads neuter all three (I have a box of 357 158gr fmjs that advertise 1100fps. That’s just a stout 38+p in my book).

Anywho, I don’t have anywhere I was going with this. I don’t really plan on getting another magnum handgun in the next 5 years (if I do, it would probably be another 357), but plans change sometimes. I just wanted to share that I like the sound of this cartridge, especially as a reloader.

Feel free to chime in with solid reasons not to get a 41mag, so my wife doesn’t kill me with a rolling pin.
 

·
reluctant sinner
Joined
·
21,860 Posts
I think Elmer considered it a better long range pistol cartridge than the 44 mag. If I'm putting up with the muzzle blast then I'm taking the 44 over the 41 and 357. 41 stuff has always been harder to find. I have shot them but I have nothing to feed them, except perhaps a bullet swedge die but no cups for it.
 

·
*********
Joined
·
2,089 Posts
Greetings all.

I think everyone knows I’m a fan of one-off calibers. Specifically the old ones that still live on, just with limited factory support. Things like 280Rem, 32 Winchester and the sort. Sure they don’t do anything better than any other caliber, but they’re just something different. And that’s where my interest in 41 Remington Magnum comes from.

The 41mag isn’t anything particularly special: it’s just in the middle between 357 and 44mag, though closer to the 44 side of the spectrum. Factory loads neuter all three (I have a box of 357 158gr fmjs that advertise 1100fps. That’s just a stout 38+p in my book).

Anywho, I don’t have anywhere I was going with this. I don’t really plan on getting another magnum handgun in the next 5 years (if I do, it would probably be another 357), but plans change sometimes. I just wanted to share that I like the sound of this cartridge, especially as a reloader.

Feel free to chime in with solid reasons not to get a 41mag, so my wife doesn’t kill me with a rolling pin.
Considering the 44 mag is technically .429. It’s a half millimeter difference between it and the .41 mag. The .357 is a full 1.4 mm below .41. For comparison, there is 1.3 mm when going from a .17 to a .22, Almost triple the difference between a .41 and a “.44”

it’s just not enough to warrant a new gun for it imo. But to each their own. I would accept and keep it if anyone ever gave me one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,982 Posts
Bought my first .41 Mag back in 1978. Blued 6" Model 57 S&W in a factory presentation case.

The very first function check shot I took with it was dead on (without adjusting the sights). A cantaloupe sized small river boulder at ~125 yards on the other side of our gravel pit range. It was partly good aim, but mostly dumb luck. That shot made with (then) very hot factory Remington JSP hunting load. Much Boom and So Fun. Brought an instant smile to my face. I never looked back and have loved that amazing cartridge ever since. A versatile, powerful, and accurate handgun caliber.

Over the years, I've owned a number of .41 handguns. Dan Wesson, Ruger, & S&W. My very favorite is still the fixed sight bull-barreled S&W Model 58. Something sleekly practical for defensive carry.

.41 kinda cured me of my earlier .44 Mag itch. It also left me bored with large frame .357s. As with .357 or .44, you can fire loads that range from powder puff to fire belching hand cannon. For my purposes, .41 delivers everything that .44 does. Stoked hot, .41 was one of the few handgun calibers that early Kevlar vests were not guaranteed against. Because it could deliver velocities that handily exceeded vest ratings. Also very effective against multiple car body layers and auto glass. Good caliber for a glove compartment car gun.

Obviously, the cartridge never remotely approached the entrenched volume sales of .357 or .44. Mainly because of the limited factory load options offered back in the early days. It never enjoyed the vast selection of bullets & subsequent bullet design improvements that the other two calibers did. Not to mention that fewer gun brands/models in .41 Mag were ever offered.

Nevertheless, IMHO, it's a lot more versatile cartridge than either (in terms of loading velocities up or down). The most "common" factory defensive load is Winchester Silvertip 175 grain @ 1250 fps. Essentially identical (ballistics & bullet) to the load offered for 10mm semi-autos & revolvers. It's an effective and mild shooting load (out of an N-Frame, DW, Redhawk, or Blackhawk), but that expanding Silvertip bullet design was sorta frozen in stasis decades ago.

If you could buy more modern HST, PDX, or Gold Dot configurations in .41 Remington Magnum today... they'd be amazing defensive bullets. Sadly, few manufacturers offer factory loads for other than hunting... and optimizing .41 self defense bullet performance is something mainly left to reloaders.

To my mind, a stainless Ruger Redhawk in .41 magnum is a nearly ideal back country or survival handgun. Good for medium to large North American game and still pretty damn effective as a practical open carry self defense revolver.

I've meant to acquire a .41 lever action to accompany my revolvers, but never have.

Still my very favorite handgun cartridge. It's my Goldilocks Zone revolver cartridge choice.
 
Joined
·
1,813 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If I ever get one it will be a trail gun/hunting revolver. I’m happy enough with 9mm and 38/357 for two-leg threats. But a 41 loaded “spicy” with a 265gr JSP or heavy Kieth bullet out of a 6” M57 Smith would just make a dandy little deer/black bear ventilator.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
716 Posts
Bought my first .41 Mag back in 1978. Blued 6" Model 57 S&W in a factory presentation case.

The very first function check shot I took with it was dead on (without adjusting the sights). A cantaloupe sized small river boulder at ~125 yards on the other side of our gravel pit range. That shot made with (then) very hot factory Remington JSP hunting load. Much Boom and So Fun. Brought an instant smile to my face. I never looked back and have loved that amazing cartridge ever since. A versatile, powerful, and accurate handgun caliber.

Over the years, I've owned a number of .41 handguns. Dan Wesson, Ruger, & S&W. My very favorite is still the fixed sight bull-barreled S&W Model 58. Something sleekly practical for defensive carry.

.41 kinda cured me of my earlier .44 Mag itch. It also left me bored with large frame .357s. As with .357 or .44, you can fire loads that range from powder puff to fire belching hand cannon. For my purposes, .41 delivers everything that .44 does. Stoked hot, .41 was one of the few handgun calibers that early Kevlar vests were not guaranteed against. Because it could deliver velocities that handily exceeded vest ratings. Also very effective against multiple car body layers and auto glass. Good caliber for a glove compartment car gun.

Obviously, the cartridge never remotely approached the entrenched volume sales of .357 or .44. Mainly because of the limited factory load options offered back in the early days. It never enjoyed the vast selection of bullets & subsequent bullet design improvements that the other two calibers did. Not too mention that fewer gun brands/models in .41 Mag were ever offered.

Nevertheless, IMHO, it's a lot more versatile cartridge than either (in terms of loading velocities up or down). The most "common" factory defensive load is Winchester Silvertip 175 grain @ 1250 fps. Essentially identical to the load offered for 10mm semi-autos & revolvers. It's an effective and mild shooting load (out of an N-Frame, DW, Redhawk, or Blackhawk), but that expanding Silvertip bullet design was sorta frozen in stasis decades ago.

If you could buy more modern HST, PDX, or Gold Dot configurations in .41 Remington Magnum today... they'd be amazing defensive bullets. Sadly, few manufacturers offer factory loads for other than hunting... and optimizing .41 self defense bullet performance is something mainly left to reloaders.

To my mind, a stainless Ruger Redhawk in .41 magnum is a nearly ideal back country or survival handgun. Good for medium to large North American game and still pretty damn effective as a practical open carry self defense revolver.

I've meant to acquire a .41 lever action to accompany my revolvers, but never have.

Still my very favorite handgun cartridge. It's my Goldilocks Zone revolver cartridge choice.
I greatly dislike most revolvers and I recently sold my last one, but I think you just convinced me to buy a .41 mag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,982 Posts
I live among black bears. They come right up to the house. Occasionally we have surprise mutual encounters. They almost always haul ass (or at least amble off nonchalantly). Thus, my walking around daytime gun is a 4" Model 58. It's enough gun and cartridge for that purpose.

At night, I switch to a .40 semi-auto with a railed light.
 
  • Like
Reactions: HappyinID
Joined
·
1,813 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I live in Grizzly/moose country, and when I’m traipsing through their backyard it’s typically with a 12 gauge and 3” 1.25oz slugs. But I live in town (right now), and when I’m at the farm where my wife and I work, I can’t really lug the shotgun around. I had been carrying my Beretta out there, but now that I have the 357, I feel a little better.

I had a bear encounter out there on Friday actually. Nothing came of it other than a a very surprised bear and a few choice words from me. It was in the neighbor’s trash, and when he scared it off with a frying pan it ran under the fence to the field where I was dumping a load of manure. He got about 15 feet away before either of us realized.
 

·
*********
Joined
·
2,089 Posts
I’ve flirted with the idea of a 41 mag since I was a kid. Just something about that load that appeals to me. Once I found a nice older S&W chambered for it and seriously considered buying it. Then I priced the ammo. I was instantly cured.
That’s how I feel about getting a 454
 
Joined
·
1,813 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I’ve flirted with the idea of a 41 mag since I was a kid. Just something about that load that appeals to me. Once I found a nice older S&W chambered for it and seriously considered buying it. Then I priced the ammo. I was instantly cured.
That’s been my issue with magnums for a while. I found a nice S&W Model 27-2 for a steal a few years ago, but I didn’t have my reloading setup with me at the time and couldn’t afford the ammo.

Now that I once again am able to “roll my own,” weird ammo has become less of a deterrent.
 
Joined
·
1,813 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The stupidest thing I ever did at a gun show was trade my nickel plated like new 6 1/2 model 57 with recessed chambers because it wasn't a 44.

Replacing that gun today will cost me well over a grand.
That’s…unfortunate.

I did similarly with a truck. I couldn’t get the thing to stay running, and didn’t have the time or money to keep working at it, so I sold it for $200. The guy who bought it eventually traced the issue to a wire shorting on the frame. A penny in electrical tape and he has a running truck.

I bought a WWII Enfield with the money though, so there’s that I guess.
 
Joined
·
1,813 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Great round, had half a dozen over the years but have consolidated calibers, should have kept one or two. I too like odd ball calibers, 22 mag, 38-55, 280 Rem., 35 Whelen
I have a 22mag (convertible revolver, I use shorts and lr for squirrels, mag cylinder for fall Turkey), 280 is my deer/elk/bear rifle. I want a 38-55, since I have a Model 94 Winchester in 30-30, and need to complete the entire cartridge gamut of original loadings. 35 Whelen was a contender for the 280s spot.

You’re speaking my language.
 
Joined
·
1,813 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Talk to me when you get a savage 99 in 300 savage.
Better yet, I know where one is right now, almost like new condition, takedown model made in the 30's, but chambered in 250-3000 savage.

The O.G. speed king varmint cartridge.
I had a friend that was big into the old Savage rifles. He had multiple Model 99s of different flavors. His favorite was a 308 with Weaver K4 on it (anecdote: while visiting his house he saw a coyote in the front pasture near the cows. He then opened the window, rested that rifle on the frame, and proceeded to kill said coyote at 400 yards without getting out of his easy chair).

He offered me a 250-3000 once, but the price was too steep at the time. After his death his son took that rifle and kills varmints and and deer with it.
 
1 - 20 of 62 Posts
Top