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I recently got called to set up a job interview. It pays well, but I was surprised to find out about the amount of driving I would have to do around the county doing inspections. The furthest distance w/o knowing the exact addy would be 75 miles away. Imagining the worst case senario... Having to walk home all the way I divided the miles by 5 and got 30 days of walking. What does this mean for me? It means I have to have 30 days of food with me in the cart in the car ready to go at any time. I have also considered what else I would need to make g o o d easier on me.

Yesterday I came up with a combination if convenient foods, drink mixes, etc.... I will post this the next time I have an actual computer and not a hand held device.

Of course that day I just might be carpooling w a non-prepper and have to make sure to have enough for two.
 

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The furthest distance w/o knowing the exact addy would be 75 miles away. Imagining the worst case senario... Having to walk home all the way I divided the miles by 5 and got 30 days of walking.
On an average, a trained man fully loaded, can do around 15 miles a day on foot. It will take you around 3 days to reach home. If you pushed further, maybe 2.5 days or lesser.

Do some training, fully loaded, its definitely not as bad as 30 days on foot;).

With a 'proper' Bike with racking, you can do it in less than a day, also fully loaded.
 

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FWIW, I have seen a lot of claims and estimates about hiking distances. There are a lot of posters here and a lot of websites that give you these estimates. Yet, they very widely. I figured the only way I could truly find out was to do it.

I found that hiking off road, with my BOB, I could hike about 7 miles a day and still allow time for breakdown of camp, finding a suitable new cap location, camp set up, fire making, food prep and clean up, etc...and still allow a suitable amount of time for rest and sleep.

I'm sure many can do more than this. I am 40 and in reasonable shape as I work outside with my hands all day and coach youth sports. A younger person who devotes time to training could probably do 10-12 miles in my opinion.

But I would strongly recommend that if you are unsure of how much ground you can cover in a day and still have daylight to provide for your needs, take a weekend and give yourself the test. It is the only true way to know your limits and set reasonable expectations for yourself should you ever need to actually do it.
 

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great idea --- get up with the sun (cause that is what you will do while sleeping outside) have a meal gatehr your belongings, and then head out, stop for lunch, head out and stop 2 hours before dark -- be willing to bet you get more than 2.5 miles as the author of this thread suggested with a 30 day walk
 

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old hand
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we're anywhere from 3 days (2.5 if you push it) to 30 days to go 75 miles.

It's simple math folks. (I'm thinkin' any guy with nothing else to do could walk fifteen miles a day on a road.)
That's five days, you'll be home before the weekend.
I'll bet I could walk the 75 miles in one or two days if I had to.
 

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Molon Labe, Psalm 109:8
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If you nothing to do all day except walk, you will easily average 2 miles/hour unless you are in VERY rough terrain. assuming 1 hour to prep in the morning and 1 hour to prep at night with a 1 hour rest in the middle of the day, 16 miles per day is no big feat assuming that you have the proper footwear and that evasive tactics are not required.
 

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If you nothing to do all day except walk, you will easily average 2 miles/hour unless you are in VERY rough terrain. assuming 1 hour to prep in the morning and 1 hour to prep at night with a 1 hour rest in the middle of the day, 16 miles per day is no big feat assuming that you have the proper footwear and that evasive tactics are not required.

I agree. Except I can't make camp, build a fire, make food, clean up in an hour. I'm old and move slow. :)
 

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Our first hike of last season turned into a disaster. We were at Mammoth Cave National Park in Kentucky in February. We were planning on doing a simple dayhike to get us prepared for the rest of the season. It was going to be 7 miles or so over varied and moderately hilly terrain.

We set off about 10am with moderate packs (Mine was 25 or so, one of my friends was close to 40 and his wife's was a daypack in at 15 or so). The short version of the story is that we got very lost.

When we finally reached the road again, we were on the wrong side of a river in the park (Mammoth Cave runs 2 ferries over the river), but managed to get cell service and got picked up around Midnight (the driver had to drive all the way around 4 extra towns to come in from the north side of the park!).

In the 10 hours we were hiking, we covered 19 miles. We did 5 miles in the dark with just headlamps. We filtered water as we had run out at around mile 12. We ate 3 times, 2 of them cooked on a hiker's stove. The last 3/4 of a mile was more than a 45-degree incline. I was at least 30 lbs overweight and not in great shape. None of us had done any other heavy physical activity for at least 60 days.

All this to say, I think preparing for a 30-day walk might be excessive. I am close to your age (39) and can regularly hike more than 7-8 miles in a few hours. I could (and I believe most reasonably active people could) probably sustain at least 10 miles a day in almost any condition other than blistering hot or below 0.

Plus, think about the logistics of 30 days of food, water and supplies. You'll be doubling or tripling the weight you'd need to carry. For a 7-day hike prep, you could get away with 60 pounds or so, including everything you'd need in the way of food, water (assuming you have a filter) and shelter. Assuming 12hours of daylight, you could hike 1 mile per hour and still have 2 left for setup and takedown. And actually, you could take down and do morning cooking in the dark and set off at dawn. A more reasonable assumption would be at least 1.5 miles per hour, allowing 5 or more hours for setting up camp, which should be sufficient no matter how old or slow you are!=)
 

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It seems like everybody is looking at this in so many different ways. I believe if he's 75 miles away from home he will be walking on roads on the way back. Also I do not get this 2 hours to set up camp at the end of the day.

I guess it just depends on your equipment. If you have a nice little camp or esbit stove you start boiling some water. While that's boiling you set up your small tent or hammock. Eat, rinse off your cup and you are done. I could do this in much less than an hour.

This is also an example of being familiar with your equipment and actually using it on somewhat of a regular basis.

If I am having to build fires and natural shelters and hunt, trap, and fish for food just on my way home than I've done something very wrong.
 

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It seems like everybody is looking at this in so many different ways. I believe if he's 75 miles away from home he will be walking on roads on the way back. Also I do not get this 2 hours to set up camp at the end of the day.

I guess it just depends on your equipment. If you have a nice little camp or esbit stove you start boiling some water. While that's boiling you set up your small tent or hammock. Eat, rinse off your cup and you are done. I could do this in much less than an hour.

This is also an example of being familiar with your equipment and actually using it on somewhat of a regular basis.

If I am having to build fires and natural shelters and hunt, trap, and fish for food just on my way home than I've done something very wrong.
LOL,

Nobody likes my camp set up and take down time. I guess I just prefer to be a little more thorough and leisurely about it.

Find a good spot. 15 mins.
Recon area around that spot 20 mins.
Clear that spot 10 mins.
Rig tarp and sleeping area 10 mins.
Gather fire wood for the night 10 mins
Start fire and get water on to boil 10 mins
Take care of toilet and hygiene needs 15 mins.
Eat 10 mins.
Clean up 5 mins.

About 2 hours. It's taken me that long no matter how many times I've done it, in what conditions. It just takes that long. Kudos to those who can set up a decent camp and be warm and fed in 30 mins. I can't do it.
 

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Chin I totally understand what you're saying. Now a days when I "camp" it's with a 3/4 ton Chev. Avalalnche dragging around an off road type pop-up with all the bells and whistles. It seems like everytime I add something or get something to make things easier it really adds to set up and take down times.

That is camping. This thread is about getting home asap in a shtf event. I love a good fire and refuse to camp without one but in an event like this I would probably pass. I'd be so tired from walking all day I'd just crash. If I had any energy left I would continue walking until tired.

I think it would be best to not have to cook period. But if I did it would be with some kind of stove. I would not waste energy building natural shelters or fires.
 
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