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Okay, I've got this 275 gallon water tote (previously held corn syrup) that I've got to clean out, but then what? I don't want to rotate 275 gallons every 6 months. :eek: What do I do to keep it clean and algae free for a longer period of time? Do I need to buy that (expensive) special water treatment stuff, or can I use bleach or something? Thanks!
 

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Bleach works. I've seen one oz. per 200 gal. if you regularly rotate it.

For SHTF use you might want to get some dry pool shock calcium hypochlorite. It doesn't break down like liquid bleach does in storage.
 

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http://www.learnaboutpools.com/poolshocks.html

You can use granular calcium hypochlorite to disinfect water.
Add and dissolve one heaping teaspoon of high-test granular calcium hypochlorite (approximately ¼ ounce) for each two gallons of water, or 5 milliliters (approximately 7 grams) per 7.5 liters of water. The mixture will produce a stock chlorine solution of approximately 500 milligrams per liter, since the calcium hypochlorite has available chlorine equal to 70 percent of its weight. To disinfect water, add the chlorine solution in the ratio of one part of chlorine solution to each 100 parts of water to be treated. This is roughly equal to adding 1 pint (16 ounces) of stock chlorine to each 12.5 gallons of water or (approximately ½ liter to 50 liters of water) to be disinfected. To remove any objectionable chlorine odor, aerate the disinfected water by pouring it back and forth from one clean container to another.
 

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keep it in a shady part of the yard and make sure its where you will end up using as it will end up weighing about a ton when filled
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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I used to use bleach, but bleach has a short shelf life. Check the thread on calcium hypochlorite. I was rotating my water into the garden and lawn, so that part was easy. But by adding chlorine and keeping light out, you won't have any problems. You can easily keep light out by attaching cheapo tarps to the frame.

BTW, congrats on finding the tank. They can be a challenge sometimes. Cleaning them out can be a challenge too. Mine held soy oil, so it was a chore. I flipped it upside down onto saw horses and used a pressure washer with a dishsoap solution to spray up inside it until I got it clean.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I used to use bleach, but bleach has a short shelf life. Check the thread on calcium hypochlorite. I was rotating my water into the garden and lawn, so that part was easy. But by adding chlorine and keeping light out, you won't have any problems. You can easily keep light out by attaching cheapo tarps to the frame.
So for storage of the water (not treating it before drinking it) I can use bleach or calcium hypochlorite to prevent algae growth. Do you know for how long? Should I use the same amount per gallon that I use in my 1-gallon containers that I rotate every 6 months or more? What willl be enough to keep me from rotating again in 6 months? I'd like to get at least a year before needing to rotate the tank.
 

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So for storage of the water (not treating it before drinking it) I can use bleach or calcium hypochlorite to prevent algae growth. Do you know for how long? Should I use the same amount per gallon that I use in my 1-gallon containers that I rotate every 6 months or more? What willl be enough to keep me from rotating again in 6 months? I'd like to get at least a year before needing to rotate the tank.
I don't know how long the calcium hypochlorite lasts. I believe it stays in the water longer than bleach. But the time varies according to temperature. I always used my nose. As long as I could smell a slight whiff of chlorine, it was good. If I didn't, I re-treated. I don't know if chlorine is effective against algae, but keeping the sunlight out will not allow it to grow in the first place.

You may need to re-treat it twice a year or so, with treatements being closer together in warm weather and farther apart in winter. Same amount per gallon as your 1 gallon containers. That works out to about 1/2 cup per tank for treating at the 8 drops per gallon rate, or a cup for treating suspect water. I use 1/2 cup and it's pretty strong because the water I fill with already had chlorine in it. But it airs out some. If you're using calcium hypochlorite, make a 5% stock solution to use it at these same rates. If you use a different strength solution, recalculate accordingly.
 

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My Temperature is Right
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I would just keep the container clean and sheltered, and not fill it unless the need seemed eminent. Only takes a couple of hours. The main thing is that you've got the capacity in place and ready to go.
 

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I would just keep the container clean and sheltered, and not fill it unless the need seemed eminent. Only takes a couple of hours. The main thing is that you've got the capacity in place and ready to go.
Trying to fill at the last minute is risky. There are a lot of possible situations where your first warning that something has happened is that the water stops flowing. There was a thread not too long ago where that happened to a guy here. Also, think about the number of surprise boil orders that have been issued.

Like all other preps, they really should be in place ahead of time. You never know what might happen and it's better to have it on hand, just in case.
 

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My Temperature is Right
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Trying to fill at the last minute is risky. There are a lot of possible situations where your first warning that something has happened is that the water stops flowing. There was a thread not too long ago where that happened to a guy here. Also, think about the number of surprise boil orders that have been issued.

Like all other preps, they really should be in place ahead of time. You never know what might happen and it's better to have it on hand, just in case.[/QUOTE

To me it's a matter of degree. What I would need a 175 gal tank of water to handle will be noticeable on the horizion. Localized things like power outages and boil water notices can easily be handled by my short term water storage and the hot water heater. It's all a matter of perceived threat and ability to meet that threat. I'd rather not have to babysit a water tank if I don't have to, and when it's full you do have to pay attention to it from time to time, if only to make sure it won't kill you when the time of need arrives.
 

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Gun Luvin Hippie
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Hook the tank up in-line with your house water system. They easiest way of doing this is in your yard. Simply connect a short section of water hose from you backyard spigot to the tank inlet. Then connect your regular full length hose to the tank outlet. Every time you turn on your spigot to water the lawn or wash the car you're cycling fresh water from house through the tank before it exits reg. length garden hose.

I helped a freind install this system under his backyard deck. His house was on a slope so if city water quit, the last remaining water in the house system would gravitate down into his tank.

PM me if you have any plumbing questions about this set up.

Hemp
 

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This may be a dumb question but why would you add chlorine to tap water if it's already chlorinated?

I read that water has an indefinite shelf life. If that's so, then why rotate it at all? Can't you just run it through a Berkey or some other purification process before you drink it?
Thanks
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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To me it's a matter of degree. What I would need a 175 gal tank of water to handle will be noticeable on the horizion. Localized things like power outages and boil water notices can easily be handled by my short term water storage and the hot water heater. It's all a matter of perceived threat and ability to meet that threat. I'd rather not have to babysit a water tank if I don't have to, and when it's full you do have to pay attention to it from time to time, if only to make sure it won't kill you when the time of need arrives.
A lot of it also has to do with where someone lives. If they're in an area where water is pumped electrically, then it's wise to keep it filled. If they're in a place where it is pumped into water towers and distributed by gravity, then they're in a safer situation to fill at the last minute. Otherwise a SHTF situation starting off with a blackout makes filling impossible from the start.

Another fear I've always had is a terrorist act against the water. I used to dirt bike a lot and have found several access points to the main water line coming into town. This has always made me uneasy.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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This may be a dumb question but why would you add chlorine to tap water if it's already chlorinated?

I read that water has an indefinite shelf life. If that's so, then why rotate it at all? Can't you just run it through a Berkey or some other purification process before you drink it?
Thanks
Technically you don't have to. I did it because the residual chlorine is a lot less at the user level than when it was first chlorinated. It helps keep the levels high enough to protect the water in storage.

I started rotating the water because the garden was just behind it and a yard was right in front. It just made sense to do so. Plus I didn't have to worry about chlorine levels that way. Everyone's ideal solution will be different. Rotation isn't easy at this house, so it's chlorination for me.

You could let it gunk up then filter it and it would be fine. But I figure why go to the trouble, when it's easier to just make sure it always has a trace of chlorine in it. I guess that falls under my lifelong habit of "better an ounce of prevention than a pound of cure".
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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Hook the tank up in-line with your house water system. They easiest way of doing this is in your yard. Simply connect a short section of water hose from you backyard spigot to the tank inlet. Then connect your regular full length hose to the tank outlet. Every time you turn on your spigot to water the lawn or wash the car you're cycling fresh water from house through the tank before it exits reg. length garden hose.

I helped a freind install this system under his backyard deck. His house was on a slope so if city water quit, the last remaining water in the house system would gravitate down into his tank.

PM me if you have any plumbing questions about this set up.

Hemp
If her tank is like mine, they're not set up for pressure. So you can't effectively plumb them inline.
 

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If the tank is to be place outside, I would recommend placement in an area without direct sunlight. The sunlight will increase the growth of algae. Also, consider winter conditions. Not sure of the weather in Northern Mississippi, but I would think that freezing temps may be a problem.
 

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I don't know how long the calcium hypochlorite lasts. I believe it stays in the water longer than bleach. But the time varies according to temperature. I always used my nose. As long as I could smell a slight whiff of chlorine, it was good. If I didn't, I re-treated. I don't know if chlorine is effective against algae, but keeping the sunlight out will not allow it to grow in the first place.

You may need to re-treat it twice a year or so, with treatements being closer together in warm weather and farther apart in winter. Same amount per gallon as your 1 gallon containers. That works out to about 1/2 cup per tank for treating at the 8 drops per gallon rate, or a cup for treating suspect water. I use 1/2 cup and it's pretty strong because the water I fill with already had chlorine in it. But it airs out some. If you're using calcium hypochlorite, make a 5% stock solution to use it at these same rates. If you use a different strength solution, recalculate accordingly.

so do you keep the same water and not rotate but just retreat the water?

i think i would 1/2-3/4 way burry the tank it will not only reduce sunlight contact but it will help keep it coolier in the summer and may keep it from freezing in the winter
 
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