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I have never thought airlines were a good investment. They all put expansion over profitability as far back as the 60s.
airlines are one of the worst for sure. Huge capital, bad unions, lots of regulation, and total commoditization by customers. They are lucky to make any money at all. Growth pretty much comes at the expense of your competitors. They are closer to a utility without the stability.
 

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Not bad, but I doubled my money flipping cruise line stocks back in the spring.

Look at the chart for gold, or silver. People say it "holds its value", but that's not precisely true. Its value has a floor, but if you buy at $2000 today, or $2100 tomorrow, in a year it could easily be back down to $1800, or $1500. It's a commodity, and all commodities have value floors (being real goods).

Nothing is a guaranteed store of wealth that cannot lose. Some things may be more stable than others, and with silver and gold, that's generally true. As with all other things, you still need to buy low and sell high, and not the other way around!

And at the end of the day, no investment will ever beat assets that allow you to produce wealth. BB's posts prove that: the gold placer deposit thing he has going works because of the equipment he put on it, which has probably paid for itself ten times over. Now that's a return on investment. But it takes work.
 
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Not bad, but I doubled my money flipping cruise line stocks back in the spring.

Look at the chart for gold, or silver. People say it "holds its value", but that's not precisely true. Its value has a floor, but if you buy at $2000 today, or $2100 tomorrow, in a year it could easily be back down to $1800, or $1500. It's a commodity, and all commodities have value floors (being real goods).

Nothing is a guaranteed store of wealth that cannot lose. Some things may be more stable than others, and with silver and gold, that's generally true. As with all other things, you still need to buy low and sell high, and not the other way around!

And at the end of the day, no investment will ever beat assets that allow you to produce wealth. BB's posts prove that: the gold placer deposit thing he has going works because of the equipment he put on it, which has probably paid for itself ten times over. Now that's a return on investment. But it takes work.
i doubled my money buying silver Kennedy halves, in less than a year. Wish I would have bought thousands!
I will admit tho, I like BB’s method but it’s a lot of work. Interesting work!
 

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airlines are one of the worst for sure. Huge capital, bad unions, lots of regulation, and total commoditization by customers. They are lucky to make any money at all. Growth pretty much comes at the expense of your competitors. They are closer to a utility without the stability.
As far as growth they increased revenue 90% in 15 years, despite the 5 year slump in passengers after the 2008/9 recession.

I think safety regulation helps, it reduces the ability for new entrants to cut corners on maintenance and operations and undercut established provider. OTOH, some of the marketing restrictions Hurt them, as well as the fact they subsidize the entire aerospace system for all users. It is boom and bust.

I’m not allowed to own airline stock due to some of the work I do, I’m not the least bit bothered by that.
 

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i doubled my money buying silver Kennedy halves, in less than a year. Wish I would have bought thousands!
I will admit tho, I like BB’s method but it’s a lot of work. Interesting work!
I had a college professor that was fond of pointing out that one had not gained anything until the asset was actually sold.

None-the-less we all think in terms of the current market value.
 

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I had a college professor that was fond of pointing out that one had not gained anything until the asset was actually sold.

None-the-less we all think in terms of the current market value.
this is true, neither a gain OR loss is realized until the asset is sold (or ceases to exist)

we have seen this with both gold and silver several times before. price doubles, even triples from baseline, if you sold at the top you realized a big gain. if you held it all the way through, after it fell again, you ended up around where you started. it's happened so many times its almost like clockwork. but having the discipline to buy "when times are good" and fear is not in the air is something preppers have to work on, isn't it
 

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Gold is now hovering around $1,900 an ounce, up about 28% for the last 12 months.

My view is, besides the now obvious tyranny of the fake pandemic Democrat lock down power grab, people are waking up to the massive money printing going on world wide and buying physical PM's as a hedge. It's coinciding with the gun run and the openly Marxist agenda of the Democrats, who do not believe in an honest election, law & order or the Constitution. People are nervous, and should be. I hear war drums in the distance.

There is a written 2,000 year history about money being destroyed by governments. You can find these books on Amazon & Ebay for sale, but the number of books available is very thin since the book was never reprinted. "Penniless Billionaires" on Ebay, the cheapest price I could find in good condition. - https://www.ebay.com/itm/154144825648?ssPageName=STRK:MESELX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1555.l2649

:thumb:
 

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Bad Moon Rising
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"... people are waking up to the massive money printing going on world wide and buying physical PM's as a hedge."
Smart people are, perhaps, because one day that bill will become due.

But I'd also throw out there that -

  • stocks are overpriced (and were overpriced before COVID-19 became a pandemic)
  • the return on bonds is severely impacted by central banks lowering interest rates to essentially zero
  • market anxiety has spiked as a result of both the pandemic and it's outcomes (i.e. shutting down most production/manufacturing and where that wasn't shut down, cratering markets as employers laid off or furloughed tens of thousands of workers), and
  • ancillary unpredictable variables such as an election year, natural disasters, and civil unrest in many major cities.
So many investors are looking around for places to sustain their investments, and PMs have historically been a shelter when the rest of the world looks bleak.

That's no doubt driving up the cost of PMs as well.
 

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this is true, neither a gain OR loss is realized until the asset is sold (or ceases to exist)

we have seen this with both gold and silver several times before. price doubles, even triples from baseline, if you sold at the top you realized a big gain. if you held it all the way through, after it fell again, you ended up around where you started. it's happened so many times its almost like clockwork. but having the discipline to buy "when times are good" and fear is not in the air is something preppers have to work on, isn't it
That is like saying people that purchased GE stock when it was above $51 have not lost money.

At any given point in them an asset is only worth its current market price. Each time you do not sell you are betting the price will increase faster than other investment options or at least faster than a bank savings account.

This is why money is a valuation of account.
 

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Look at purchasing power of your fiat currency per unit over time. https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/hyperinflation-here
I have learned not to waste my time on zerohedge.

Everyone knows the purchasing power of a USD has changed over time. That is not the point except for people that hoard USD.

I have repeated the definition of money so often Everyone posting here knows it. Money is the anything that is generally accepted as the mode of exchange of goods and services.

The point is how has the purchasing power of an hour's work changed. That has changed for the positive. A limited money supply stagnates economic growth and limits producers ability to sell goods and services. A money supply that grows with economic demand results in technological growth which both increase the output of an hour's work but also increases what the worth of that hour of work will buy.
 

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With all the fraud in metals going on trust is thin at best.
Cans of food, tools, fuel, and other necessities of life are likely to be the better bartering tool. Can you prove the gold in your hand is not lead covered in gold with out melting it down? and once you do that, then what do you have? not gold mixed with brass/copper.
 

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With all the fraud in metals going on trust is thin at best.
Cans of food, tools, fuel, and other necessities of life are likely to be the better bartering tool. Can you prove the gold in your hand is not lead covered in gold with out melting it down? and once you do that, then what do you have? not gold mixed with brass/copper.
Gold is a store of value, for large buys, not for purchasing a chicken. That’s what silver is for. You can prove gold with appropriate test devices.
 

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Rom 14:1, 13; Jam 4:11-12
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I have repeated the definition of money so often Everyone posting here knows it.
And have been wrong EVERY single time.

Money is the anything that is generally accepted as the mode of exchange of goods and services.
+ a store of value.

Minus this property, "money" is a medium of robbery. 90% of the buying power of the "money" my father earned in the 1960's has been robbed.

Hence the ongoing interest in commodities. Due to technology, they should be decreasing - relative to inflationary FRN - in value over time but are increasing. That's how little Federal Reserve Notes represent real money.
 

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And have been wrong EVERY single time.



+ a store of value.

Minus this property, "money" is a medium of robbery. 90% of the buying power of the "money" my father earned in the 1960's has been robbed.

Hence the ongoing interest in commodities. Due to technology, they should be decreasing - relative to inflationary FRN - in value over time but are increasing. That's how little Federal Reserve Notes represent real money.
The only store of value important to money (assuming abject hyper-inflation caused by socialism) is its relative value. A five dollar bill must be worth five ones and half a ten, etc. That was the cause of much of the problems of our money in our early history.

Every time gold and silver got out of the fiat established value our money would begin to disappear. Less money made for less trade.

Prove me wrong go use something you think is a store of value as money at the Walmart.

No one uses or money as a store of value. They use it to buy goods and services; they save a little bit to cover annual taxes and insurance; or they invest in something that believe will appreciate.

Let me see if I can find some of my old hard money research.
 
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