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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have purchased 20 5 gallon food grade buckets, 20 brand new lids with seals, 20 of the 2000cc oxygen absorbers and 25 mylar bags. I have a family of 4 which includes a wife and 2 boys under 4. If you were me what would you put in these buckets for long term food storage. I have been very busy and just haven't made time to do the research so I figured that I would ask the experts. I'm still new but learning as much as I can. My goal is to do everything all at once so I don't waste the oxygen absorbers. I would love to have any input and maybe even spell it out in detail. Thanks!
 

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ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒ&
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rice, beans, sugar, flour, pasta, powdered eggs, powdered milk, powdered butter, oats, cooking oil, lard, lentils and other dried peas.
 

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You should make room in each bucket for a little chocolate, so your wife doesn't kill you when she is having to eat the other stuff you put in the buckets.

Seriously, I have chocolate stashed for my wife. I figure when SHTF and it's just me and her, I will need all the help I can get.
 

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a lot of this hinges on your likes and dislikes as well as the likes and dislikes of your family or anyone else you would be feeding with this food. the motto store what you eat and eat what you store still applies to this even though its more long term.

also, think of whats realistic. dont buy wheat unless you know how to use it or have the tools for it. the same goes for rice, dont buy 10000 pounds of rice unless you have an effective way of being able to cook it (or plan on getting one) eating uncooked rice sucks, thats why the birds die :D:

other than that think about your dry goods. rice, pasta, beans (different kinds store better than others) and also what i call dry "ingredients" type goods like flour, sugar, wheat etc.

best of luck on these decisions and the process. let us know how it goes and if you think about it or have the time, take some pictures and show us how you did it along the way.

Kid_M
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What do you suggest for an effective way of cooking the rice? Do you have any specifics on what kind of pasta stores better? Good idea with the pictures. As soon as I have everything purchased and laid out I will take pictures and post them. Thanks for your help as I really want to get this going.
 

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Rice and beans....you get the most bang for the buck with them. They can last 30 years if sealed properly. Complete meal. I would recommend baqgging some salt too....rice and beans needs a little salt to make the taste better.

Might also try grits, oats, sugar, drink mixes (gatorade), potato flakes
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Can I buy just the grits, oats, sugar and potato flake that I would find at the grocery store? I have purchased a large bag of rice and pinto beans from Costco to get me going but do you recommend any other type of beans?
 

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Canellini or white navy, great northern, etc are the most nutritious of their type, save some of the heirloom types which you won't find at the grocer.

Garbanzos are awesome too, as they can be prepared as beans or flour, and they're very nutritious.

If you like sprouts, then I'd go for some seed too - a lot of very nutritious greens in about a week, and very compact.

But to answer the thread title: Beer!:thumb:
 

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You might also want to consider Baking Powder and Baking Soda so you can bake. Also some form of dried veggies/fruits are good to round out a meal. Flour and corn meal will not store as long as wheat and dried corn. So if you can afford a wheat mill I highly suggest it, I have one and use it to make wheat and corn flour. I only grind what I need, makes a great improvement on long term storage. Also consider some spices and maybe some drink mixes.
 

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Other types of beans: kidney beans for chili; black beans for refried beans and Mexican dishes; split peas for soup [yeah, they're not beans, but they are all legumes]. Get stuff to go with the beans: TVP or some kind of freeze-dried meat, canned tomatoes or whatever else you put in with them, bacon bits [lots of flavor, Costco has in nice large bags], etc.

Don't forget you don't have to fill the buckets with just one kind of thing; you can vacuum pack smaller quantities of things and put them in the bucket and seal it up and keep it safe[r] from rodents and bugs.

BTW, I find that bay leaves help keep bugs away, and I freeze flour, rice, etc. for 48 hours as well after vac-packing it.
 

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I like to toss a bag of salt inside each pale of rice, and such.
 

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Don't buy and seal up flour.
Even with o2 absorbers it doesn't keep long like whole grains.
Couple years max unless you buy it in sealed metal cans cans that are purged with nitrogen.
Honeyville grains has many nice bulk grains and the shipping is cheap.
buy small bags of each type of bean and try them.
If you and yours don't like lentils....don't buy 1000 pounds of lentils the buy what you eat and eat what you buy mantra is a good key to follow.
Now is a good time to change you diet, not AFTER all other choices are gone.
The day after SHTF or you lose you job or whatever is not the time to find out your guts are intolerant to wheat gluten or your kids are in deep hatred of kidney beans and buckwheat pancakes.
There is a good thread going titled how long will my food last in this section....hit that for some nice ideas.
 

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I had heard of amaranth but was floored by the description of its nutritional value.

Nutritive Value of Amaranth Grain

The grain is high in protein (15 - 18%).When the amaranth is used in combination with wheat, corn or brown rice it results in a complete protein as high in food values fish, red meat or poultry.

Contains respectable amounts of lysine and methione ( not found in other grains.

It contains two times more calcium than milk.

The fiber content of amaranth is three times that of wheat and iron content, five times more than wheat.

The grain also contains potassium,phosphorus,vitamin A&C.

Also contains tocotrienols ( a form of vitamin E),which has cholesterol-lowering activity in humans.

Contains 6-10% oil, which is unsaturated and high in linoleic.

Traditionally, A. hybridus was used to treat a variety of ailments. A tea made from the leaves was thought to stop bleeding from ulcers and cure diarrhoea (Anon). The pulp has been reported to cause vomiting and skin cooling. The fruit syrup is reported to relieve chest pains. The seeds are used to treat intestinal worms while the oil extracted from the plant is used externally to relieve headaches.



I am going to seriously look into prepping some of this stuff.
 
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