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Strength and Honor
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290 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone. So after doing a lot of research I decided to take on a duracoat project and see what the hype is all about. I originally wanted to try a Beretta 92 for a military theme, but I found a good deal on a used Taurus PT92, which fit the bill nicely. For magazines I picked up some milsurp M9 varieties, to which I added some Beretta floorplates and modified to work with the Taurus. For a color scheme I chose a two-tone combination of tactical black and tactical dark earth from Duracoat's "tactical ultra flat" line of colors. I found the duracoat easy to work with and would definately recommend it. Here are some lessons learned along the way:

1) Do your research before starting. Look at some examples of what you want to work on and compare colors. Know what you want the final product to look like and plan accordingly.

2) Completely disassemble your weapon as far as you are comfortable with. You will need to go farther than a basic field strip to properly clean and prep the surfaces for the duracoat. When I took out the mainspring and hammer strut it looked like a rats nest in there.

3) Prep the surfaces completely. The duracoat must have a somewhat rough surface to bond with. Many recommend sand blasting, but I did fine with some 320 and 400 grit sandpaper. Carb cleaner worked well to blast out any residual oils from all the little nooks and crannies.

4) Invest in a air compressor. Some people try to get by with the canned air, but I've heard way more bad than good using those to spray with. An air compressor is also a great help during prep and cleanup.

5) Keep your distance. The duracoat will run if you get too close (ask me how I know). For me 6 to 8 inches was the sweet spot for spraying at 40 psi.

6) Let the duracoat cure before messing with your gun. I plan on waiting at least a month before going to the range. This stuff needs sufficient time to fully harden.

7) Mask off the weapon internals completely. I got a little too much on some of the pins and grooves and had to break out the file and sandpaper to make everything go back together smoothly.

8) Don't forget the PPG. Glasses, respirator, and latex gloves should be considered mandatory.

So that's about it, now I have to think of a new project.......:D:

BEFORE


AFTER
 

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Strength and Honor
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290 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the feedback, I enjoyed the project and look forward to another one. For those thinking about it I'd say go for it. You don't have to jump right in with a firearm, a lot of people start small with a knife or something to get their feet wet.

davis- I didn't start with a kit since I wanted to use my own spray gun. I just bought the paint ($30 for an 8oz bottle) and the recommended reducer ($13 for 8oz) for cleanup. The paint already comes with the required hardener, and there is plenty of paint left to use again. Duracoat has other prep and finishing products, but I seemed to do ok without them for this project. It's a pretty small investment compared to what a pro would charge you.
 

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zombie response team
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3,188 Posts
Thanks for the feedback, I enjoyed the project and look forward to another one. For those thinking about it I'd say go for it. You don't have to jump right in with a firearm, a lot of people start small with a knife or something to get their feet wet.

davis- I didn't start with a kit since I wanted to use my own spray gun. I just bought the paint ($30 for an 8oz bottle) and the recommended reducer ($13 for 8oz) for cleanup. The paint already comes with the required hardener, and there is plenty of paint left to use again. Duracoat has other prep and finishing products, but I seemed to do ok without them for this project. It's a pretty small investment compared to what a pro would charge you.
ok another q, hows the seem of the finnish at the muzzle? did u use a peice of wood to put down the barrel to mask it? just been wondering how it comes to gether on the buisness end.
 

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Strength and Honor
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290 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
ok another q, hows the seem of the finnish at the muzzle? did u use a peice of wood to put down the barrel to mask it? just been wondering how it comes to gether on the buisness end.
For the barrel I stuck a piece of playdoh in each end and molded it to seal off the muzzle and chamber. It worked out pretty well, I'll probably use that method the next time.
 

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From my duracoat experiences--get a SMALL airbrush...like a pensized one. The air compressor is a must.

Also, I would wait much longer than a month before doing much handling of the gun. We painted a polymer collapsible stock and the buffer tube immediately showed wear and we had waited 5 weeks. We leaned the gun up against a table and it put a little ding in the forearm of the stock as well....

In retrospect, I would either bake it--or wait longer...like 2 months.

~Norinco
 

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zombie response team
Joined
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3,188 Posts
From my duracoat experiences--get a SMALL airbrush...like a pensized one. The air compressor is a must.

Also, I would wait much longer than a month before doing much handling of the gun. We painted a polymer collapsible stock and the buffer tube immediately showed wear and we had waited 5 weeks. We leaned the gun up against a table and it put a little ding in the forearm of the stock as well....

In retrospect, I would either bake it--or wait longer...like 2 months.

~Norinco
can i use a regular full size compressor like for inflating car tires and just turn it down as far as the psi, or are there even adapters to make this possible?
and what are airbrushes running now days?
thanx for the info
 

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Premium Member
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68,758 Posts
Looks like your finish came out great! Congrats. I bet you start planning to refinish a bunch of your guns with it now! :D:

I've done a lot of Duracoat finishes over the years, and I can't second the air compressor enough! Harbor Freight sells a small airbrush compressor cheap and it works great. You don't have to worry about oil vapor or condensation in the line, which can ruin a finish in a hurry.

I learned to do Duracoat from their videos. I use a hair dryer in one hand and the airbrush in the other. You can get fine mist coats that dry fast that way. This eliminates runs and thin corners and edges which is a common application problem. I suggest the video to anyone starting Duracoating.

I try to do the finish in the hot part of summer. Our summers are very hot and dry here and it helps the finish cure faster. I can assemble a gun in a few days, and it's ready for light shooting in a week or so that way. You can also oven-cure the finish.
 
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