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Christian
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Check the YMCA for some Red Cross classes also many community colleges have good first responder classes you can take. These will allow you to network with others who have the same interests and possibly talk to EMT's or medical staff about their recommendations and where to buy certain items.

Just pick up the basics for your first FAK and then build on that as your training allows.

Good luck with your project.
 

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Some employers offer them if your willing to be a first responder for them. Outside of that I would say try the red cross.
 

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Semper Fi
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9,986 Posts
Made my own kits from store bought and surplus military items. The Marines provided my training but the Red Cross has classes and I imagine there is plenty of youtube stuff on it. I believe there are also several websites with medical professionals offering training.
 

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I have issues
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2,507 Posts
Check with your local fire department. Often times they have first responder classes. Or check with any local colleges in the area. Many offer classes on emergency medical/first responder. As well as advanced paramedic level.
 

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There are multiple places that offer training. I have found, as an instructor, that classroom with hands on added in at various times, seems to be the best learning environment. I have taught for AMerican Heart Assn., Red Cross and ASHI. A are similar in AMR, it's a DOT standard.
Most FD's and rescue squads offer the basic AMR for no charge. EMT, Paramedic, and RN generally start low and rise in price with the curriculum.
For the average person, AMR, and what we call the Alphabet classes, will usually suffice. You can audit most Alphabet classes, but not get certified. I highly recommend North American Rescue's PHTLS-TCCC class, or D-Dey Response Groups model. I took the class with the D-Dey guys and they are great.
I am not affiliated with either group, but I do buy from NAR, as they are a local company (Greenville, SC) and offer a metric **** ton of supplies from Molle packs to Tac Med kits. K-9, and human. The sell ballistics and a ton of other stuff, and have field reps worldwide. Many militaries make bulk purchases from them. Most items are great, the chest seals are above average, nothing a rag and duct tape can't make work, 99% of the time(no joke). Duct tape is a tool that everyone should have! We have used it in EMS for a ton of things, especially an MVA in the rain, or to make a chest seal when the patient is wet. Sounds odd, I know, but it works well. Sterility is the least of the patients worries if duct tape or asystole is present. The best rules are as follows - Fick Principal in short - air goes in and out, blood goes round and round, if any one of them is compromised, bad things happen.
Simple things are often missed, because big things are noticed. Someone not breathing is bad, a broken leg is less important.
All bleeding eventually stops and finally, Asystole(flat line) is the most stable heart rhythm.
Google D-Dey and NAR, ASHI and others. Call and ask if you can audit an EMT or AMR class if you don't test. Same info for use, just no title.
In medical, a little is ok, but can get you in deep quick. Don't over think the problem. Start with a big box of problems and narrow it down by tossing what it can't be. Then you treat accordingly.
As for the kit, get the items that you learn and need. Practice often and build muscle memory. Most providers, myself included, fail to remember to practice the small stuff. As my EMT partner told me one day, Paramedics save lives on the streets, EMT's save Paramedics. Then we hand off our patient to the trauma RN's and hopefully give an accurate report. Then the RN's save the Md's butts, it is all progressive.
Start slow, learn and practice. Save your money on items that are bulky and use what's at hand. SAM splints are good, a good windlass Tourniquet is good, ace wrap and bandages are good, and something to irrigate and sterilize is a must. Start small and as you grow, get a bigger kit. Bigger is not always better. It can hinder of there a is a bunch of stuff that's not used.
SC DHEC EMS, and other agencies have lists that may help, and some SWAT protocols for Medics are often online. In a tactical setting, active shooter stuff, stopping the threat saves more lives than anything else. Sounds harsh, but it's true. You are no good to anyone if u r dead. Cover your 6 and if you can safely remove the patient from a hot zone, try it once.
JMHO
Hope it helps.
 

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Semper Fi
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9,986 Posts
Someone suggested to check about CERT training where you live.
I did the CERT thing and while it might have just been my area, the first aid instruction was on the light side.
 

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One with everything...
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1,808 Posts
I'm going back to school (and putting up with some decidedly socialist propaganda, much to my disgust) specifically TO get medical training. I want to go as far as I can because when and if S does HTF its one thing people WILL need... It's a godawful lot of work (hard work at that) and the socialist commie leftist indoctrinationists work hard to make people follow their poisonous drivel, but I figure... it's only time and work and money and it may make a HUGE difference!
 

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Where I am you need a sponsoring agency to get into things like EMT training, whi h is really centered around having an ambulance. Easiest is join the volunteer fire department. They will often kick in money for classes. Some jobs will do the same even giving g paid time for classes.

I just took the CERT class and there were two nights on medical. But it was more triage than treatment. Basic stuff like stop bleeding, check breathing, watch for shock and mentation. Also head to toe assesment and documentation.
 
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