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El Cid, I hate hippies.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently picked up a 150 acre's for BOL, it has two stocked ponds, a marsh area and a crick running through it, a few apple orchards that were planted about 100 years ago and have not been maintain in decades (they're so overgrown they're hard to find) and about 40 acres of fields that I could plant with food plots for deer or whatever. However, I really don't want to farm, so I'm really planting people food, except maybe corn, but that's more to attract deer anyhow. Other than 40 acre's of fields it is all heavily wooded, there are no structures on the land and it is surrounded by farms. I don't really want to build anything big on it for tax reasons, at least right now. It's very near to where I live.

What would you do with it? How would you prepare it? I'm open to ideas. Sorry this is such a vague question, I just haven't got any ideas for it yet. SO I'm trying to think of some reasonable ways to prepare it in the near future. I won't be building any earth homes or anything like that on it for a great deal of time. My goal is to have safe, secure BOL, that will sustain a handful of people for a good length of time. What should I do to attract more game? I need more wild animals along the lines of rabbits, turkey, grouse and things smaller than deer.
 

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Behind Enemy Lines
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776 Posts
I get a few gardens somewhere in the fields.

I would go into the thick woods and clear out an area. Not sure what size but not TOO big. Just enough for a little camp.

Plant carrots for rabits and with turkey, you cna just use a bird feeder with bird seeds.
 

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Last of the First Line
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I've actually thought about this more than a few times, while looking for the right piece of land.

I'd throw up a temporary shelter at first - something like a yurt. It'd probably do for a short/medium term "home" - while building a log cabin. Have to have a full size basement - and a huge root cellar.

Next thing I'd do is put up signs on the property line - every 20 feet or so, so that nobody could say "Oh, I didn't see any signs." The signs would all be something like these - the classic "No Trespassing. Violators will be shot. Survivors will be shot again" and "Poachers Will Be Fed To My Dogs!" and "Squatters Will Be Evicted, Dead or Alive"...

I'd put up a barn - can be used as a garage, workshop, general storage, hangout place when the house seems a little to cramped.

I'd start cutting down trees for firewood, since it takes a while for it to be ready to burn. And trees - I'd plant fast growing trees, suitable for firewood, on any land that was cleared and wasn't going to be used for crops.
 

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Hunter/Farmer
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1,950 Posts
Put that field back into ag production. Contact a local farmer and lease it out.
That income should pay the property taxes at least.
Save the apple orchard if you can.

Got a well,....keep it maintained,....if not drill one.

Deer require both heavy cover and open areas. Leave the heavy cover and plant food plots on the open areas. Oats, rye are some of the easy ones to grow. Better are the ones that supply nuitrition Like LabLab beans and such.
My neighbor to the north cleared most of his thick trees around the lake here because he said it looks better. Now I got all the deer and ducks on my property.:D:

Tractor and bushhog type mower would be the first thing I'd be looking for.
Chainsaw would be next.
A travel trailer would be nice to stay in till the time comes to permanently live there.:thumb:
 

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I was thinking yurt too, Hammerhead. Maybe prepare a site for a yurt, tipi, or good walled tent. Put up a deck in a secluded spot on you land.

As for wildlife, wild animals need food, water, air and space. Their air is pretty much taken care of unless you are looking for improving you creek for fish. A few logs or boulders in the stream can make the water roll over it and add oxygen to the water. Logs near the banks of the creek will give the fish shelter. Food will come when a creek is healthy and water...well, let's hope that's already there.

If you have a great deal of non-native species of plants in the area you may have to remove them. Some of them can be eaten by game animals but many of them can choke off the plants that the animals actually eat. Water is provided by the stream. Most game animals are edge species and live better in a mixed habitat. Swamps where they can hide out, pine, spruce or cedar forests where they can rest if it gets cold, fields where they can eat, next to woods so they feel safe. If the stream has steep bans you may want to create a beach so animals can get down to the water easily. In fact this is a good hunting "funnel", a place where many animals go into a small space to get what they need.

Deer fed on corn and clover do not taste as gamey so an alternating planting of corn and clover can bring them in. You can't plant corn over and over in the same spot because it is so hard on the soil. You can start going to your local grocery store and asking what they do with their out of date food. In this area it is a first come first serve grab and go. I use it mainly for my domestic animals but nothing bring in game animals like out of date Hostess cupcakes. Make yourself a bait pile (if it is legal where you are, if not don't tell me if you are doing it or not) near a hunting blind or stand and set up a game camera to see what all comes it to it.

I'm just thinking off the top of my head and the bell just rang so if something else pops into my brain I'll post it.

If you feel comfortable showing us pictures, please share. I wouldn't mind seeing another BOL.:)

blt
 

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Pursuing freedom.
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296 Posts
You can build your own Tiny House, unless you have the money to buy it outright. They are built on a trailer chassis, so are considered mobile, and non-taxable as a permanent fixture to the property. A shipping container would serve the same purpose, as would a larger "mobile office", that is used on job sites. There are a lot of those available right now. They usually have a sink & toilet in a little bathroom, and the rest is open. You can put in a do-it-yourself corner shower kit from Lowe's or Home Depot, fix yourself a kitchen area, using your coleman stove, etc. They also come with a window unit, built through an end wall, providing enough heating and cooling. I have seen almost a dozen of these lately, for less than $2,500, that need just a little work to be habitable.

What I did on a piece of land, before I had to sell it, is put up a pole barn. It has minimal impact on taxes and depending on where you live, you do not need a permit. They do have kits for those that costs about $2,500, and include the poles, trusses, tin for the roof, etc., if you do not want to build it yourself.

After the barn is built, stage wood for a raised floor system and walls, wood stove, etc. If things get bad, live out of your tent until you get it all setup with the material you already have onsite.
 

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These look great. I was thinking maybe put an army walled tent on a platform similar to the one in the video. Anyone know a source for one?
 

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Pursuing freedom.
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These look great. I was thinking maybe put an army walled tent on a platform similar to the one in the video. Anyone know a source for one?
I agree with you on the platform idea. I have had that idea with a wall tent myself.

As for the GP Mediums and such, you need to go to a larger Army-Navy store. You might also just ask any one of them if they can get them. I am sure they are available online, but I would hate to pay that shipping cost.
 

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Adaptable.
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Congrats! Sounds great. If you really want to leave the land alone for now, I'd say get a chainsaw and some picks n' shovels and clear out an orchard or two. Add a forage seed blend between the trees, and toss down some deerlix or mineral salt. Add a hunting stand.

When clearing a camp, keep in mind that you can build a nice mud and log lean-to with a fire pit using the trees you yank out. Get your dirt from the fire pit excavation. Nothing glamorous, but would keep you warm if you need to get up there in a cold month.

I would survey the ponds and see what you have in terms of fish. If need be, add some fry; trout, catfish, tilapia, etc. If you can get them, crawdads.

A camper is a good idea, but long term storage of campers outdoors, tends to collect more moisture than is good, and you can grow mushrooms in the carpet. Damp-rid dehumidifiers are a good buy for such scenarios.

I would spend as much time there as possible, in both good and bad weather. I made some dumb mistakes in clearing my property that cost me more work once I saw how heavy rains come through the property. My first raised beds are heavily shaded in winter. Little things you'll learn are priceless.

Man, have fun!
 

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Preparing...
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What i don't understand is, isn't it a bit of a waste of money buying all that land only for a BOL. How much would that much land cost. Wouldn't you just live there.
 

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"I would survey the ponds and see what you have in terms of fish. If need be, add some fry; trout, catfish, tilapia, etc. If you can get them, crawdads."


Good idea except crawdads/crawfish. My experience is that they tunnel in to levees and dams causing leaks and soft spots. They also are loved by beaver which will also tunnel into said levee/dam. I have a 4 acre pond that is drained now due to levee damage by beaver. A pond consultant( guy from the dept agriculture) told me that the crawdads from a shallow upper pond made it more attractive to beaver.
Just my experience, no intent to offend.
 

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El Cid, I hate hippies.
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
It will not be just a BOL, eventually I will retire there, but I have another 40 years before that happens. I want to use the land as hunting land as well. RIght now I have a deer stand that I put up, as well as a few older deer stands that were already there. I have a tractor for it, and all the implements and I have been clearing out some of the woods with my Husqvarna Chainsaw, there's a sh*tload of firewood. The ponds need a little clearing so that I can get to them more easiily, and they are stocked with bass.

I will eventually build a large timber frame hunting cabin that is completely off the grid. There are ample natural gas resources and well water which I will be able to use, located on the land. HOwever, I do not have the income for this right now, so I am looking at making some temporary changes that will prepare it for hard times.

I have been cutting and stacking ample firewood, I have a brick type oven/stove/grill up there, and an area cleared out for camping equipment, near one of the ponds.

I think I will try and plant a few gardens this spring when the snow is gone, but right now, we're under a few feet of white stuff. Like I said, in the long run I want to have a self-sustaining, off the grid homestead type of deal going on. Renting out some of acreage to farmers is a great idea, thanks for that, I will look into it right away. That will be a nice, and easy source of income.
 

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El Cid, I hate hippies.
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Will trout survive without flowing water. These ponds are man mad, but very very old, I think they were originally meant to water animals, they are about 3/4 of an acre, I know there are bass, I'd love to have trout, but I didn't think they'd live without moving water.
 

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El Cid, I hate hippies.
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I think when it thaws I'll take the tractor and try to make a pit type structure back in the woods for fun and see how that turns out. Either way it will be a good learning experience for me, and I can use it when I hunt if I get caught in bad weather or want to spend the night.
 

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Silent Bob
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When the time to bug out comes, you need to keep in mind how many other people know about the pond and orchard. I'm willing to bet there are a few who are planning on, or will think of your land when times get bad.
 

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Hunter/Farmer
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I think trout have a maximum water temp tolerance of around 65 degrees.
They stock them in lakes here in the winter, but they do not survive the higher water temps come Spring/Summer. Check with a fish hatchery in your area for advice.
Another advantage to ag rental is the ag exemption you can claim. Saves my butt on property taxes.
 

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Will trout survive without flowing water. These ponds are man mad, but very very old, I think they were originally meant to water animals, they are about 3/4 of an acre, I know there are bass, I'd love to have trout, but I didn't think they'd live without moving water.
they should be able to survive, as long as it doesn't get too warm in the summer as that would kill them off, if its windy there don't worry about anything, they should be good though, definitely talk to a consultatnt if your going to stock your pond.
 

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Trout can be stocked in large ponds and lakes but most do not spawn except in free flowing water, so you would have to constantly restock most trout. The water does need to be deep in some places because trout live in the cool deep part of most stocked lakes. Then a warmer water fish like walleye or bass are stocked for the warmer layer of the lake. This gives a nice two layer fishing area but again, only for so long because most trout will not spawn there. In cold areas like Minnesota the lake trout there do spawn in the cold waters but much further south and that isn't going to happen.

If I had a shallow pond that I was going to stock I might go with a pan fish of some sort. They can live almost any where and will continue unless they are over fished or if the pond freezes to the bottom. You should do a survey of your pond's fish though. Rent a zapper and check to see if you first have to kill off what fish are there. Some of the bigger, more predatory fish will eat anything you put your hard earned money into.

You mentioned you had a crick, I took this as a small stream but maybe I don't know the jargon. I don't know how big it is, but check with your state's natural resource department and see if it is already a fishing stream. Sometimes the most unassuming piece of flowing water is a class A trout stream and you wouldn't know it by looking at it.

blt
 
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