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10mm or .357 Sig?

  • 10mm

    Votes: 67 78.8%
  • .357Sig

    Votes: 18 21.2%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
IF you where going to pick one for conceal carry, woods carry while hunting/hiking which one would you choose and why? Out of these 2 calibers the only one i have not shot is the .357sig.
 

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I voted for the Sig, mainly because of reloading.......greater choice of bullets!

I prefer magnum revolvers for anything aside from concealed carry. I don't think I'd like the 10mm much in a CC type weapon
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
.357 Magnum (revolver) is not on the list so I won't respond to this thread.

Revolvers remain an excellent option for woods/hunting/hiking - which is what I carry - but they are not an option so I will not give my opinion on the best all around carry gun for my needs.....

Which is a .357 Magnum revolver.
I hear ya on the .357 Magnum, I just like the idea of a little more capacity. The Glock 29 is 10+1 & now Pearce makes +2 for the Glock 20/29. Glock 32(.357Sig) is 13+1. I'm definitely not a revolver hater, its just a capacity thing. :D::thumb:
 

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357SIG is really nothing more than +P+ 9mm.

Bullet selection is kind of limited too. Most 9mm bullets arent the right shape for the weight. I used to reload for it, and bullet selection was limited and usually more expensive.

357SIG was basically designed to mimic one 357MAG loading, the 125 grain load that was so popular when the revolver was still king. It comes pretty close to that. Beyond that, its pretty limited.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
357SIG is really nothing more than +P+ 9mm.

Bullet selection is kind of limited too. Most 9mm bullets arent the right shape for the weight. I used to reload for it, and bullet selection was limited and usually more expensive.

357SIG was basically designed to mimic one 357MAG loading, the 125 grain load that was so popular when the revolver was still king. It comes pretty close to that. Beyond that, its pretty limited.
I came across this video, would you agree with him about the .357sig?


 

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357 SIG: For woods carry, with a 5.5" barrel in a Glock 33 or 32 or 31 you can get around 1580 FPS and 650 ft lbs energy at the muzzle. Then just switch out to your factory barrel for concealed carry.

10 mm is really good but for cc might be a little bulky and possibly more power than you need.
 

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10 mm. Far more options in guns, heavier bullets available, more power available as well.

Concealing a 10 mm isn't that hard.:rolleyes:
 

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I watched that whole damn thing and dont know what he was saying. Watching him prime that brass was excruciating! LOL. :D:

I spent about 5 years living and breathing 357SIG. Had 6 guns in the caliber, 5 SIG's and a Glock. I dont have a one now.

My Glock 31 was what got me to look harder at it and finally give it up. The 31 was basically beating itself to death. I picked up a spare LWD 9mm conversion barrel for it, and actually shot more 9mm out of it than 357SIG. My SIG's in the caliber seemed to handle the round fine, and showed no excessive wear.

Shooting 357SIG out of the 31 and +P+ 9mm out of the 17, the only noticeable difference was the "bark" of the 357. Other than that, they shot the same. If some one handed you one or the other, without telling you which was which, and I seriously doubt you'd be able to tell shooting them.

The standard 357SIG load is/was 125 bullet at 1350fps. I know some, like Double Tap, load it a little hotter, and with different weight bullets, but they arent the "norm". Not sure how they are getting the extra out of it either, as its a 40,000psi round, and basically already loaded to max. My understanding is, some of them "blend" powders to acchive the extra velocity, without exceeding max pressures. I dont think its something we would likely be doing though.

I loaded quite a bit of 357SIG while I was using it. Its not as hard as some will tell you, basically one extra step. You either lube (no really sure you even have to, I chose not to), or use a .40 carbide sizer first.

The bullets are basically caliber specific, and while some standard 9mm bullets will work, not all will.

I always used 13 grains of AA #9, which is a compressed load. That helps eliminate the bullet set back issue and makes neck tension a little less critical.

I have accidentally loaded and shot .40 brass. Its hard to tell one from the other when youre picking up range brass and just running things through the mill. I only happened to notice it a couple of times while prepping brass and still have no idea as to how many times I loaded and fired them before I found out.

What he was saying in the video about the brass being different is my understanding as well. Its just not necked down .40 S&W. It does still happen, but I wouldn't recommend it. I did notice that the .40 cases Id sized, were a few thousandths shorter in OAL. Didnt seem to affect anything function wise though.

When I was buying factory by the case, 357SIG and .40 S&W were the exact same price ($250/1000) Back just prior to when Obama got it, and things went nuts, everything took off and went out of sight pretty quick. I was getting out of it right about then, and sold a number of unopened cases for over $400. For awhile there, it was selling for close to $600 a case.

.40 seemed to come back down in price pretty quick, for some reason, 357SIG didnt. Not sure where its at now.

Just prior to all of that, I really wasnt reloading the round much, simply because it want worth it. Something like a buck a box different between factory case lot prices, and my reloads. Once things changed, it became a lot more economical to reload. Finding components tended to be a challenge though.


At this point, I really dont see a point in switching to it, unless youre looking for something to play with. 9mm is just a lot more versatile and economical and in all respects.

I carry a 9mm all the time. I dont switch up if I go here, or go there. I just carry what I always carry. If I were going into the woods where I thought I might need something bigger, Im carrying a rifle or 12ga.
 

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My choice would be the 10 mm . it has a nice heavy bullet at Magnum a velocity. I'd say it has a lot more oomph than the 357 Sig. from what I have heard in Western Canada in the North of British Columbia where you can get a licence if required to carry a handgun in the bush the 10 mm is the smallest caliber you are allowed to carry. it's for protection against Brown Bears.
 

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There is wide selecton of 10mm bullets available. I would rather put a bullet designed for the 40S&W in a 10 than a bullet designed for the 9mm in the 357.


I have two 10s and a 357 barrel for my 40. Going into the woods, same one I carried on duty when given the choice, the 1006.
 

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youre not going to get much better out of a 357 sig than you could get from a hotter 9mm and you can get 9mm hotter in the same pistol safely than a 357 or 40, so if you want a significant enough power increase to justify oddball ammo, go with 10mm, or you could get 9x25 dillon which instead of 40S&W necked down to a 9 like the 357 sig, its a 10mm necked down to 9.. those will deliver a 124 grain bullet at 1600-1700fps actually matching 357 mag.. basically 9x25 dillon gives you what 357 sig aficionados think they have
 

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I'd take the 10mm any day. I have a Glock 10 that has a 15 round capacity. It's a big pistol, but the shape of an auto makes it easier to carry than a big revolver. And it's easy to shoot. (My apologies to any revolver aficionados here; I like revolvers too, but this has been my experience.)

Glock also makes a subcompact 10 but I have no experience with it. I carry a subcompact .40 and find it easy to carry and easy to shoot, so I assume the sub 10 wouldn't be much different.

What I don't like about the 10 is that most factory ammo for it is loaded down to the point that it isn't much more powerful than a .40, but the pistol is still a big bulky pistol. You can find more powerful ammo though if you want to look for it and I suppose a handloader would do well with the 10.

I carry a .40 because it's as small as a 9 and has a little more umph and I can hit with it as well as I can hit with the 9. But in the woods where I might have to depend on it to stop a big ugly animal I'd take the 10, loaded with the hottest loads I could get. (And that of course would be just in case I couldn't get to my rifle or shotgun fast enough.)
 
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