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Dutch oven fried chicken is some of the best yard bird I've ever eaten.........
They also make a mean cobbler as well. plus you can just treat them like a crock pot and they will make the same meal for you. We use ours all the time when camping and will again this weekend.
 

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I think there is a chart on the lodge site that will tell you how many charcoal lumps to put on top and below your oven. Like 6 below and 12 on top gives you 300 deg. heat for a 10" oven. If I remember right it has a chart that covers 8, 10, 12, & 14 " ovens.
 

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lil vid on what can be done,simple really. IMHO on some meals D/O's work great for cook and forget stuff like stews,soups,and some meats. baking gets a lil dicey , but isnt to hard once you do it enough times.
enjoy.
 

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Been wanting to get a 12 inch oven.I see they come in either regular or deep. any pros or cons for either one? Seems like the deep might be more versatile, but maybe I'm missing something here. Any suggestions?
 

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I used to make cobblers in Dutch Ovens all the time in Boy Scouts. Only problem I ever had was using salt instead of sugar once...blecch :eek:
 

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Ain't nothin' like Dutch Oven cookin' been doing it every weekend this year on a keyhole fire pit. Lady friend doesn't care to much for cleaning them, too heavy. Worth their weight in gold to me.
 

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Yep, I have been using Dutch Ovens for years, and as a matter of fact, I will be ordering 2 dutch oven pie pans this week from the sportsmansguide. For some reason food comes out tasting so much better when cooked in a D oven.

James
 

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Anyone can cook with a dutch oven if they do a particle of study on the topic and then get some ovens and go to work. You'll only be limited by your own imagination. D.O. cooking is THE way to go.

BTW, don't buy an aluminum oven - Okar! Just don't do it.

(snip) Secret 1: Choosing wisely

When deciding on a Dutch oven, there are a few important guidelines to keep in mind. A common question is, “Should I buy cast iron or aluminum?” Both have some advantages. Aluminum Dutch ovens weigh about one-third less than their cast iron counterparts. They require no curing, and, like the cast iron pots, can be used over open fires, buried underground, or used with coals or briquettes. However, aluminum Dutch ovens do not retain heat as well nor distribute it as evenly as cast iron. The flavoring of foods produced will also be different. Aluminum ovens sometimes give a chalky flavor to foods, whereas iron ovens give a smoked flavor to foods. Most Dutch oven aficionados use only cast iron ovens.

When buying a cast iron Dutch oven, whether new or used, look carefully at these five important areas:

1. Only buy Dutch ovens with legs. Some are manufactured with flat bottoms and are far more difficult to use. The three legs should be cleanly attached to the bottom of the oven, never cracked, bent, or broken off.

2. Check the fit of the lid. It should lie flush with the lip of the oven all the way around, with no significant gaps.

3. Check the casting, or thickness, of the metal, especially around the rim. There will be some inconsistencies. However, areas that are 15% (or more) thicker or thinner than the remaining areas will produce hot or cold spots during cooking and cooling. This variance in thickness will also make the oven much more likely to crack or warp.

4. Make sure the lid has a loop handle, cleanly attached to its center.

5. Check the bail (the wire handle) attached to the oven itself. It should be easily movable and strong enough to use for carrying or hanging a heavy pot full of stew without difficulty.

If these five areas pass inspection, you’ve got a good Dutch oven.

Another purchase consideration is the size of the oven. Dutch ovens range in size from 8 to 22 inches in diameter. The most commonly used are 10-inch, 12-inch, and 14-inch ovens. The larger ovens hold more if you’re cooking for large groups, but they are huge, heavy, and hard to handle If you only buy one oven to get started, pick a 12-inch. Later you can add a 10-, 14- or additional 12-inch ovens.

http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles/beattie47.html (/snip)
 

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I think there is a chart on the lodge site that will tell you how many charcoal lumps to put on top and below your oven. Like 6 below and 12 on top gives you 300 deg. heat for a 10" oven. If I remember right it has a chart that covers 8, 10, 12, & 14 " ovens.
the ratio I've come to use is that 1 briquette imparts 5-10 degrees, (usually for me i say 10) so 12 below and 24 above roughly 360 degrees. usually my minimum is 8 below 16 on top. don't forget to rotate the lid 1/4 turn every 10-15 min and the pot 1/4 turn in the opposite direction every 10-15 min. to evenly distribute the charcoals heat.

the following is a link to a thread i did awhile back enjoy;
http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=263997

and good link to the original recipe; "peach stuffed french toast"
http://arkdos.org/dnn/Forums/tabid/55/forumid/2/threadid/148/scope/posts/Default.aspx
 

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The basic concept of the potjie is pretty easy. You got a potjie.
1. Get a fire going
2. Put potjie on Fire
3. Add some oil. Cooking or olive oil.
4. Heat up the oil
5. Add the meat and onions
6. Spice that up with spice like curry, pepper, cloves, garlic, sauces, lemon juice, soup blocks.
7. Brown the meat and onions.
8. Add water, juice or wine
9. Add starch food potatoes, butternut, pumpkin, beans
10. Add vegies like broccoli, cabbage
11. Add mushrooms

Keep on fire for two or three hours. Control the heat. I think lower heat may be better.
 
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